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Full text of "Annual reports, Town of Acton, Massachusetts"

ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 



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TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



TOWN OF ACTON, 

FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR 1861-62. 



ALSO, THE 



REPORT OF THE TOWN CLERK, 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT, 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY 26, 1862 



BOSTON: 
S. CHISM, — FRANKLIN PRINTING HOUSE, 

No. 112 Congress Street. 

1862. 

r% *-t A A A 



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REPORT. 



In obedience to State law, and in accordance with 
established usage, the School Committee present their 
Annual Report. 

Our school year opened with very favorable cir- 
cumstances. A Teachers' Institute, commencing Mon- 
day, April 8th, and continuing through the week, 
was an event to us of unusual interest, and highly 
enjoyed by a large and intelligent company of teach- 
ers, as well as the citizens generally of this town and 
vicinity. The town showed their appreciation of the 
object of the gathering, by offering, in a unanimous 
vote, the use of their fine Hall, warmed and lighted, 
for the sittings of the Institute. 

A motion was made to appropriate a sum of money 
to defray necessary expenses, but this was objected 
to by the friends of education, who pledged them- 
selves to furnish all the bodily comforts of board, lodg- 
ing and transportation, which might be needed by 
the members of the Institute. Proverbially generous 
and hospitable as are the people of Acton, we never 
felt more sensibly their liberality than in the present 
instance ; it was so cheerfully, so gladly rendered, 
that their kindness was made doubly acceptable and 
doubly valuable. The Institute was a great success. 



With the great-hearted and generous Joseph White 
for presiding officer, aided by Professors Russell, Ten- 
ney, and Slocum, Rev. Mr. Northrop, Dr. Sharpe, Mr. 
Philbrick, Rev. Dr. Hamlin, Hon. Henry K. Oliver, 
and finally by a highly intelligent and apprehensive 
audience, it could not well be otherwise. 

The lectures of Prof. Russell, on elocution and 
training the voice, were practical and valuable. 
Those of Professors Tenney and Slocum were spirited 
and scientific. Mr. Northrop is always earnest and 
interesting. Dr. Hamlin gave us a full and graphic 
account of the government and educational system 
of Turkey, speaking incidentally of the great improve- 
ments introduced by the missionaries ; these being 
matters which he had seen, and heard, and felt, his 
facts and descriptions were highly relished by the 
great company which gathered there to hear him. 

Nothing, however, seemed to wake up the heart of 
the whole assembly, more than the patriotic and 
liberty-loving sentiments casually introduced, and 
especially by Hon. H. K. Oliver, in the closing ad- 
dress. 

Is it not a little remarkable, that, at that very 
moment, the great rebellion was breaking out in the 
bombardment and burning of Fort Sumpter ? Nor 
was it a less interesting fact, to this town at least, 
that in this same hall, where so peacefully we had 
been, day after day, listening to words of wisdom from 
the lips of men whom we love and delight to honor — 
there should be, on Monday, April 15th, a hasty 
assembling of our brave Co. E, with their strong 
hearts and ready arms, in answer to the call of the 
President for men to defend the capital. Their part- 



ing words, their passage through Baltimore, their 
reception at Washington, their occupation of the 
Senate Chamber, and all their doings in the three 
months' service, are they not all written in our hearts 
as well as in the chronicles of the day ! 

This we may safely say; they assembled with 
alacrity, marched bravely, even through bloody Bal- 
timore, to the defence of the capital and the govern- 
ment, performed faithfully every duty, returned in 
safety, and were received with joy by a great assem- 
blage of people from all the country. 

We write these facts here not merely to make 
record of them, but to note their influence and signi- 
ficance. 

We are certain the Institute had a very good effect 
on all our teachers, enlarging their store of knowledge, 
giving them new ideas, new or improved methods of 
teaching, and more just and correct impressions of 
the important work they are called on to perform. 

The people generally, too, were interested, and 
their minds and hearts more thoroughly enlisted in 
the cause of common school education than ever. 
Nor was the call made on their liberality without its 
good influence. We all found it simple truth that it 
is more blessed to give than to receive. The only 
complaint we heard was that there were no more to 
entertain and the time so short. 

Then what are we to learn from this loud call our 
country makes to us for defenders in this day of her 
sore trial ? Surely this : That the young men from 
our common schools must mainly supply this great 
demand ; that they not only make the best soldiers 
the country ever saw, but can do anything else 



they set themselves about. We learn, too, that while 
we live on the same continent with barbarians and 
barbarian institutions, we must be prepared to defend 
the cause of liberty, not with argument merely, but 
with strong arms, clear heads, and brave hearts. It 
was a remark frequently made by Mr. Woodbury, 
that * a good school had a great deal of the military 
about it." So we think ; and that our military, from 
the 15th of April to the present hour, is the grand 
result of the common school. We fully believe the 
world never saw an army rising so suddenly from the 
common business of life, in which promptness of 
action, quick apprehension, and ready obedience and 
an ability to do anything and everything, were more 
notably displayed than in the great army of young 
men who have left our homes and our schools to fight 
the battles of liberty. 

The first public work of the committee after organ- 
ization and attending the daily sittings of the Insti- 
tute, was the permission given to our nine young 
lady teachers to commence their schools without the 
formalities of another examination. We had a life- 
long acquaintance with them all, save one; knew 
well of all their former success in teaching ; had seen 
them constant in their attendance at the Institute, 
and deeply interested in all the exercises ; for these 
reasons we had great faith in their willingness and 
ability to perform successfully the great work com- 
mitted to them. 

We considered it very fortunate that every one of 
them could teach music so far as required to render 
the exercises of the school-room cheerful, orderly, and 



lively. We are happy to say, that in our frequent 
visits to the various schools, we found our best hopes 
and highest wishes fully realized. 

The teachers were earnest, devoted and faithful ; 
scholars generally attentive, diligent and obedient. 
With such a state success is certain. 

During the winter term three of our nine teachers 
were new men. Two of them were [from Tufts Col- 
lege and one a graduate of Dartmouth. The remain- 
ing six were the same as last year. The schools were 
all visited by the committee at least every two weeks 
in the spring and fall terms ; in the winter term some 
of them still more frequently. In all our visits we en- 
deavored to serve the best interests of the school by 
encouraging and supporting the teachers in all their 
arduous labors as well as by exciting the scholars to 
make a great effort to do well their part, both in their 
studies and their behavior. 

We will present as bjrierly as may be our view of 
the several schools. 



i 



WftST SCHOOLS. 

Alden Fuller, Esq., Local Committee)^^ \ 

The primary department was taught by Miss. C. E. 
Mayhew, spring, fall and winter terms. She is well 
known to you as a faithful and successful teacher ; 
constantly improving in her methods of teaching and 
power of governing her school. At the close of the 
fall term she was made the recipient of a very pretty 
present, showing the mutual good will existing in the 
school. Her winter term exceeded in order and im- 



8 

provement any former effort. During the final exami- 
nation we began to note the various classes a "good, 
etc.," but finally found that we must write them all 
"good" or "very good," which we were right glad 
to do. 

The higher department in the spring and fall terms 
was in the care of Miss Sophia S. Harris. In view 
of the cause of the failure of that excellent teacher, 
the gentle Miss Hersey, last year, we were fully de- 
termined, that so far as in us lay, there should be a 
teacher in this school who would not easily be broken 
down in her government or her health. 

Miss Harris, while she is an excellent teacher, is able 
to govern any school we have. Her success in this 
effort was very good. During the spring term the 
old spirit of disobedience appeared very often ; was 
met by gentle words and kind admonitions ; these 
failing, more earnest means were resorted to with 
very positive good effect. The fall term was a per- 
fect success. The order, interest and improvement 
of the whole school was very satisfactory. The last 
day showed the work of the term in a very pleasant 
manner. Among the exercises deserving particular 
notice were those of the first grammar class, physi- 
ology and the various compositions, especially the 
valedictory. The whole affair finally closed with the 
presentation to the teacher of some valuable and ap- 
propriate presents by the scholars, tokens of their 
kind regards and warm good wishes. 

The higher school in winter was taught by Mr. A. 
C. Fish, of "Wisconsin. He came here with the best 
recommendations, and proved by his success that he 
well deserved them. His government was efficient, 
his motto being, " Do right," thus appealing at once 



to the better feelings of the entire school. He had, 
too, a motto for daily work and universal application, 
"I paddle my own canoe;" thus teaching by the re- 
frain of the old song, self-reliance, the necessity of a 
continual effort with every one to do his own work 
in order to strengthen his own hands, and to make 
vigorous, clear, and capable, his own mind. The full 
success of this manner of teaching was seen in every 
day's work by those visiting the school during term 
time, and some of the best results were shown to the 
great company assembled in Robinson's Hall, at the 
close of school. These exercises were all good, and 
the large audience were well pleased with the school, 
and with the teacher especially. Where every effort 
is successful, it is a delicate matter to specify. 

Among the declamations, we were most pleased 
with that of young Holman. The singing showed 
good taste, both in selection and execution. The In- 
dependent, read by Miss Huggins and Miss Whitney, 
containing the compositions of the school, displayed 
earnest thinking and good writing. 

An interesting performance was the public notice 
of those who had not been absent or tardy, or who were 
for other reasons scholars of merit, by the giving to 
each a beautiful book, presented by the teacher. The 
exercises were pleasantly closed by some eloquent 
and appropriate remarks by the teacher, and a part- 
ing song by the school. 



10 

SOUTH SCHOOLS. 

Emerson F. Fuller, Local Committee. 

The Primary School for the year was taught by 
Miss L. C. Faulkner. She is one of our very best 
teachers. Those who wish to know her real worth 
must see her, as we have, moving around in her school, 
a guardian angel; ever faithful and always correct in 
all her teachings, giving her heart and soul for the 
good of the school, and so becoming life and soul to 
them all. Her effort has been a daily success in each 
of the three terms. It was always pleasant, when 
wearied or discouraged, to drop into this school ; it 
makes life look all fresh again. 

The examination at the close of the fall term was 
a great day with the school and the crowd of inter- 
ested visitors who filled the school-room. The lessons 
in arithmetic and geography, and the reading and 
spelling, were excellent ; the speaking and singing 
select and well done. 

The winter term, however, was the crowning effort. 
The order, progress, and general character of the 
school, was all that we could ask. 

At the examination every effort was successful. 
The reading, recitations in geography, arithmetic, 
and grammar, would have been called good any- 
where ; while the speaking and singing showed good 
taste, correct teaching, and long and patient practice. 

The higher school was placed in care of Miss M. 
C. Harris. She is well known in town as a teacher, 
having had charge of five of our schools, and has 
made teaching a business for some years. It is no 
mean praise to say that Miss H. was able to keep the 



11 

school up to the high rank at which it has stood un- 
der former teachers. 

The school is large, and numbers among its mem- 
bers many excellent scholars, who are striving to fit 
themselves for stations of usefulness in future life. 
Such scholars have a happy influence on their associ- 
ates, giving tone and character to all around them. 
This school, like every other in town, partook largely 
of the spirit of the times. Marching and running, 
military exercise and martial music banished entirely 
the bat and ball and every other boyish play. We 
were glad to see more training of muscle, strengthen- 
ing of bone, connected with our schools ; for on health 
and strength, and good development of body, depend 
in a great degree all our mental power and usefulness. 
When the true and proper use of bodily exercise is 
better understood and practised, then we may confi- 
dently look for the perfection of health and vigor, 
both of body and mind. 

The examination was a pleasant affair. The read- 
ing, exercises in arithmetic and grammar, and the 
recitation in history, were all very good. Speaking 
of select pieces, and the singing, showed skill, taste, 
and tenderness, especially in allusion to those " not 
lost, but gone before." 

The higher department, in winter, was placed in 
charge of Mr. F. C. Nash, of Tufts College. We were 
well pleased with this young man, and were always 
happy to witness his energy, spirit, and kindness, in 
school, as well as the loving, obedient, and respectful 
manner of all the larger portion of the scholars. This 
teacher labored faithfully and perseveringly, not mere- 
ly during school hours, but at all times where he could 



12 

aid in the progress and increase the interest of his 
pupils in the business before them; holding weekly 
meetings for spelling, speaking, reading, and correct- 
ing compositions, etc. 

The examination was an honest display of the exact 
state of the school. While there was an abundance 
of blundering among the smaller scholars, the larger 
divisions appeared remarkably well. Classes in read- 
ing, grammar, and philosophy, merit distinct and ap- 
proving notice. Some of the declamations were good. 
The compositions read by the writers were short and 
pithy, full of good thoughts, well expressed and evi- 
dently original, speaking clearly and earnestly on sub- 
jects in which the writers were personally interested. 

The closing performance was the presentation to 
the teacher of a heavy gold pencil, by Miss Minerva 
Shattuck, in behalf of the school. It was a tasteful 
and significant gift, speaking clearly of the thought- 
ful love of the school for a kind and faithful teacher. 



NORTH SCHOOL. 

James Keyes, Jr., Local Committee. 

Mr. Keyes placed Miss M. J. Harris in this school 
for the spring and fall terms. She is a teacher of 
good experience, has always been successful in her 
schools, both in her government and instruction. 
This is a small school, and one in which it is difficult 
to maintain that life and spirit so absolutely neces- 
sary to great success. There were some very prom- 
ising scholars in school, and for the comfort of the 
teacher and the good of the school, we were very glad 



13 

there were. The teacher's work is sufficiently diffi- 
cult and trying with good material ; without it, no 
one can know a teacher's discouragement and anxiety 
but by making the experiment. Miss H. labored 
constantly, faithfully, and with good success ; for, as 
we have often had occasion to say, success in school 
is the result of labor, persistent and well-directed 
labor. Our great regret in connection with this 
school was, that there were no more partakers of its 
benefits. 

The winter school was taught by Mr. Peck, the 
teacher of last year. He is everything in school 
but just master ; pleasant and polite in his manner ; 
clear, methodical, and correct in all his teachings, his 
success would have been great and certain but for this 
one defect. We believe it was not because he did not 
possess the power of government, but that he did not 
fully realize the necessity for using it. There are 
many good scholars in this district, and while they 
must have been annoyed by the easy state of things 
aroundUhem, performed their parts exceedingly well. 
The class in the higher arithmetic and in grammar 
made good progress. The compositions were well 
written and well read. 



SOUTH-EAST SCHOOL.' 

William A. Wilde, Committee. 

Miss Nellie J. Fletcher, of this district, was em- 
ployed to teach this school. Her success in her efforts 
last year gave promise of a good school this season. 



14 

The school always appeared well when visited ; was 
quiet, orderly, and studious. Under the gentle but 
effective rule of this teacher, everything seemed to 
move on day by day smoothly and happily. There 
was no dash or display, but a steady and regular 
effort to accomplish the true mission of the school. 
The order, improvement, and general character of the 
school were very commendable. The examination 
was well attended by parents and others, and gave, 
at a glance, the pleasant result of a happy school. 
We noticed especially the reading and grammar, the 
singing and compositions. In both these last exer- 
cises, one who had suddenly left them, with the dew 
of his childhood yet fresh upon him, was tenderly 
remembered. 

The winter term was commenced by Mr. Wiggin, 
a graduate of Dartmouth. We were well pleased 
with his manner of managing a school, with the thor- 
oughness and precision of his instructions, and we 
think it is equally true that the school all hold him 
in high esteem for his efforts among them. We had 
the most pleasant anticipations of his entire success. 
Indeed we expected this school would stand far higher 
than ever, and equal if not exceed the best in town. 

But in week the teacher vanished, and the 

school came to a sudden and untimely end. 

CENTRE SCHOOLS. 

The higher department of the spring and fall terms 
was placed in care of Miss S. A. Dole. She is well 
and favorably known as a teacher in this district. 
She entered the school with spirit and hope; pursued 



15 

her course earnestly and faithfully; and though she 
did not give perfect satisfaction to every one, deserves 
much praise for her long-continued labor and well- 
directed efforts in her school. 

The final examination was very pleasant, showing 
good improvement in all the various studies pursued 
during the term; satisfying the large company of 
visitors that this had been a happy and prosperous 
school. 

The Primary School was taught by Miss Clara 
Wetherbee during the year. 

She has the very desirable power of maintaining 
order among her little folks, and at the same time 
keeping wide awake their interest in the real business 
before them. This faculty of pleasant government 
and its good results were the most notable features 
of the school. 

The examination at the close of the fall term was 
largely attended by parents and friends, who wit- 
nessed the performances of the school with great in- 
terest and hearty approval. 

The winter term was a happy repetition of her 
former efforts. The same cheerful energy, patient 
labor, and constant effort, which gave character to 
the summer terms, were here seen every day. Good 
order and general improvement were quite commend- 
able. We notice in particular the grammar class, the 
recitations and the singing. The greatest satisfaction 
was felt and expressed by visitors most deeply inter- 
ested in the school. 

The higher department of the winter school was 
placed in care of L. Conant, Jr., the efficient teacher 
of last year. We have had occasion to say many 



16 

good things of this teacher, and could say still more, 
were any words of ours needful to inform the town 
of the manifold labors and abundant success of this 
our highly favored citizen. His history is written in 
something better and more enduring than a school 
report — in the minds and hearts of grateful pupils 
and thankful parents. 

For these many years he has done in our schools 
important and enduring labor. The government and 
instruction in this school were of the most correct, 
energetic, and efficient character. No error or mis- 
take, however slight, was suffered to pass without due 
notice by the teacher. He went on the great fact, 
that all scholars, the moment they enter the school 
expect to be governed, and if need be, punished; they 
expect, too, to be required to do their whole duty in 
regard to study as well as behavior. Even good 
scholars need looking after. Franklin says, " The eye 
of the master doth more work than both his hands." 
This is a general fact, and as applicable to the school- 
room as to the workshop or the farm. The teacher 
who fails to understand the demands of the times in 
regard to the maintenance of vigorous discipline, will 
find that he is rapidly losing the love and respect of 
his school and community, while all he will gain will 
be their pity or their contempt. 

We introduce here, for the benefit of those who do 
not visit the schools, the work of a single day and of 
every day in Mr. Conant's school. 

DAILY ORDER OF EXERCISES IN THE CENTRE SCHOOL, 

Winter Term. 

Reading in Testament, two verses read by each scholar. 
Second Class in Written Arithmetic. 



17 

Second Class in Reading and Spelling. 
Third Class in Reading and Spelling. 

RECESS. 

Fourth Class in Reading and Spelling. 

Class in History of United States. 

Class in Elements of Grammar and Analysis. 

First Class in Grammar. 

Second Class in Analysis and Parsing. 

AFTERNOON. 

First Class in Analysis. 

First Class in Reading and Spelling. 

Second Class in Primary Geography. 

First Class in Primary Geography. 

Class in Grammar School Geography. 

RECESS. 

Class in Algebra. 

Class in Primary Arithmetic. 

Second Class in Mental Arithmetic. 

First Class in Mental Arithmetic. 

Third Class in Written Arithmetic. 

First Class in Written Arithmetic. 

(This recitation was usually heard after school hours.) 

It will be seen in a moment that here is work to 
be done which could be accomplished only by the 
most systematic and persistent application. Every- 
thing from morning till night went on like clock- 
work. No sooner was one class retiring from recita- 
tions, than the next would be seen advancing lightly 
and actively to take their places. There was no aim- 
less talk, but every word of the teacher went straight 
to the point. In reading, errors of pronunciation, 
accent, or inflection, were instantly and sharply cor- 
rected. Errors in grammar were not overlooked; 
double negatives, disagreement of the verb with its 
nominative, and the use of "done" for did, received 
especial attention. 



18 

The examination, though it happened on a most 
inclement day, called out as many visitors as the 
house would hold. The whole company were highly 
gratified by the thoroughness with which everything 
was done. Every class and every scholar appeared 
before us, all striving in real earnest to do their best ; 
and we are glad to say they all did well and most of 
them very well. Good progress was made in all the 
studies pursued ; in reading, spelling, and grammar, 
the improvement was most marked and satisfactory. 
The school, take it altogether, was one of unusual 
excellence, and teacher and scholars merited and 
received the highest commendation. 

The scholars themselves got up some pretty songs 
and some very appropriate declamations, which gave 
a pleasant variety to the examination ; but the main 
labor of the teacher — and it was very great — was 
spent on the common and useful branches of an every 
day education. 



EAST SCHOOL. 
James E. Billings, Local Committee. 

Miss Susan A. Davis has had the charge of this 
school for some years. She has established a character 
for faithfulness, energy, and enduring patience, of the 
most desirable order. Few teachers are so generally 
loved and trusted both by parents and scholars. 

When a teacher is seen every day performing her 
important duties with an abiding feeling of responsi- 
bility, not to her employers merely, but to the higher 



19 

powers as well, every one bestows on her their respect 
and confidence. A teacher having this manifest ap- 
proval of the people and of her own heart, is in a 
condition which enables her to do great service in 
her school, both to mind and body, morals and man- 
ners of her pupils. 

This work was done, and well done, by this teacher. 
The whole course of the schoo], and especially the fall 
examination, showed excellent progress in study and 
development of mind, which were very pleasing to a 
large company of visitors. 

The winter term opened with this teacher at her 
post of duty, as ready and fresh for her work as if 
this were her first effort. She managed her large 
school with care and prudence, and at the time with 
a decision and energy which never faltered. The 
results, as we saw them every few days, were of the 
most pleasant character. 

The school was respectful, orderly, and studious, 
deserving the approbation of the committee and the 
thanks of the district. 

The examination was very fully attended. Parents 
and other visitors were much pleased with the exer- 
cises, the order and good appearance of the pupils. 
Indeed they might well be proud of their school. 

Thoroughly interested parents cooperating with an 
efficient and devoted teacher will make a good school, 
even in a small, old, and inconvenient house. This 
school was never in a better state than at the present 
moment, which, considering its uniform good standing 
for many years, we consider high praise of this young 
lady teacher, and yet no more than she richly deserves. 

We have thus endeavored to give the town a very 
brief account of the several schools. 



20 

Of our own doings we shall say but little. They 
are already recorded. Our aim has ever been to sup- 
port and encourage the teachers ; to give all proper 
and needful aid in government and in all their efforts 
to keep the school in good working order, leaving 
details and execution entirely in the hands of the 
person in charge. We have always ventured earnest- 
ly to suggest the great propriety of teaching the use- 
ful rather than ornamental, the common rather than 
the higher studies, and of these we have more partic- 
ularly insisted on the most systematic and thorough 
training in reading, spelling, and practical grammar. 
A perfect acquaintance with these is absolutely nec- 
essary, even to a decent education. 

The proposition to have a new school-house in the 
West District has been warmly advocated. There are 
some objections. If we build a new house there, we 
must do the same thing at the South and in the Centre, 
for the accomodations are about the same at each 
place ; and more than this, if a change of house is 
really needed in any district, it is in the East. Their 
house is more worn, smaller and more inconvenient 
in proportion to the number of scholars than any 
other in town ; and finally, with our resources very 
much diminished and our expenses heavily increased 
by this grievous war, it seems to us very desirable no 
outlays of money, except those which are called for 
by absolute necessity, should be made at least for the 
present. 

The school-houses should be kept in good repair, 
and made as comfortable as possible. This is good 
economy and good policy. The better the condition 



21 

of our houses are the less will they be abused and 
defaced. The more comfortable and healthful they 
are, so much the more can be done in study and vig- 
orous thinking; for earnest and profitable study can 
well be done only when the laws of health are per- 
fectly obeyed. 

If it is not thought too great an outlay in these 
hard times we would earnestly suggest the propriety 
of discarding at once the old " box stoves " and sub- 
stituting Chilson's cast iron ventilating stove. We 
advocate this all the more readily because we have 
had for some years on most of our houses half a ven- 
tilator; the upper and more expensive half, but no 
provision for admitting pure vital air from the abun- 
dant supply in the outer world. It will be seen at 
once that our ventilators have been about as useful as 
an old bachelor or half a pair of scissors ; we hope the 
town will think best to add the other half, making the 
whole affair healthful and perfect. 

In view of the possibility that State aid may fail 
us in these war times, we hope the town will do their 
best in providing the means of carrying on our 
schools the coming year ; for although it is a time of 
trial and suffering, it is no time to abate our interest 
in the cause of universal education. It is no time to 
cripple the energies and diminish the usefulness of 
the schools for the whole people. If they ever need- 
ed it, they especially need fostering now, while the 
attention and the heart of the people are absorbed 
in other matters. 

Present welfare and the future honor of our town 
depend in great measure on the success of our efforts 
in the diffusion of knowledge. 



22 

Inasmuch as the present rebellion, which shakes 
the country to its deep foundations, is the offspring 
of ignorance and wickedness, it must be met and 
overcome by intelligence and virtue. 

We feel certain the town will forgive our frequent 
allusions to the war now raging, when they remem- 
ber that all we see, or hear, or read, speaks to us of 
its sad work ; warning us with an earnest voice to be 
ready for any and every emergency ; especially when 
we miss so many familiar faces from almost every 
school, and feel that even now they may be engaged 
in the deadly strife of battle. We could never be 
reconciled to this state of things were it not for 
the bright hope that universal freedom is to be the 
grand and final result. 

HARRIS COWDREY, 

For the Committee. 



23 

EXPENSES OF THE SOUTH SCHOOL. 

South Acton, Feb. 21, 1862. 

Amount received from Town Treasurer, $370 84 
Balance on hand from last year, 6 18 



$377 02 

SPRING TERM. 

Miss Martha Harris, 10 wks., at $4 75 per wk., $47 50 
" Charlotte C. Faulkner 9 weeks, at $4 00, 36 00 

FALL TERM. 

" Martha Harris, 10 weeks, $4 75, 47 50 

" Charlotte C. Faulkner, 10 weeks, $4 00, 40 00 

WINTER TERM. 

Mr. F. C. Nash, 11 weeks, at $10 00 per week, 110 00 
Miss Charlotte C. Faulkner, 11 weeks, $4 75, 52 25 









$333 25 


id for wood, 






28 13 


" building fires and sweeping '. 
u washing house, 
" 2 chairs, 2 brooms, 
" lock, pails, and chalk, 


house, 


3 00 
135 
1 50 
115 


a team to town, 


$377 02 
368 88 


50 




$368 88 


Balance due the District, 


$8 


14 








E. 


FULLEK. 



24 



CENTRE SCHOOL. 

Appropriation, $370 85 

Received of J. Blodget, 90 

■ $37175 
Paid for wood, 23 00 

" Clara Wetherbee, teaching 20 weeks, 75 00 
S, A. Dole, « 20 « 92 50 

? L. Conant, Jr., 12 weeks, winter term, 120 00 
" Clara Wetherbee, winter term, 48 00 

" care of the house, building fires, etc., 6 78 

$365 28 
Balance in my hands, $6 47 

Harris Cowdrey. 

SOUTH EAST SCHOOL. 

March 15, 1862. 
Length of School, Summer and Fall, each 12 weeks. 
" a " Winter, 11 weeks and 4 days. 

Money left over last year, $20 96 

Received from Town, 220 00 



$240 96 



Paid Teachers' Salary, 226 19 

" for wood, 8 50 

Making fires, 3 00 

Cleaning house, 1 12 

Repairs on house, chalk, dipper, and broom, 1 55 

$240 36 
Leaving a balance of 60 cents over. 

W. A. Wilde. 



25 

EAST SCHOOL. 

Paid Miss S. A. Davis, Spring Term, 10 wks., 

$4 75, $47 50 

li Miss S. A. Davis, Fall Term, 13 weeks, 

$4 75, 6175 

a Miss S. A. Davis, Winter Term, 16 wks,, 

§6 50, 104 00 

« For wood, 23 05 

" building fire, 2 00 

" washing house, 125 

" window curtains, 1 11 

" broom, 30 

" paH, 20 

« chalk, 20 

« 2 dippers, 10 

a glass and setting, 60 

u repairing lock and key, 50 

$242 56 

Eeceived of the Town, $220 00 

Balance in Committee's hands last year, 29 94 

249 94 
242 56 



Balance in Committee's hands, 7 38 

James E. Billings. 

WEST SCHOOL. 

July 13, 1862. 
Appropriation, $370 85 



26 



SPRING TERM. 

Paid Miss Sophia Harris, for 10 weeks, at 



iC 


$5 00, 
Miss Mayhew, for 10 weeks, at $4 00, 

FALL TERM. 


$50 00 
40 00 


66 


Miss Harris, for 10 weeks, at $5 00, 
Miss Mayhew, for 10 weeks, at $4 00, 

WINTER TERM. 


$50 00 
40 00 


a 
66 


A. C. Fish, for 11 weeks at $10 00, 
Miss Mayhew, for 11 weeks at $4 50, 
Isaac Reed, for wood, 
for making fires, 


$110 00 

49 50 

16 75 

4 00 


a 


for chalk, 


25 


66 
66 
66 


for washing floors, 
for 3 tin dippers, 
for 5 brooms, 

Leaving in my hands, 

Alden ] 


1 50 

36 

125 




$363 61 
7 24 
Fuller. 




NORTH DISTRICT. 




App 


ropriation, $220 03 


Paid for 2 1-2 cords wood, 


1125 


66 
66 
66 
66 


for sawing " 
Jennie M. Harris, for 18 weeks, 
L. V. N. Peck, for 3 months, 
for building fires, 


2 81 

8100 

120 00 

2 00 



217 06 $217 06 



Balance, $2 97 

James Keyes, Committee. 



27 



STATISTICAL TABLE FOE 1861-62. 







.2 






H 


2 


£ 




a 








g 


00 


1 


45 


IH 






s 


Districts. 


NAMES OF TEACHERS. 


o 
o 

U2-B 

u_ a 

1% 

a 
a 

>-) 


o 

a 
s 

A 
■a 

1 


i 

o 

"S 

3 
o 

a 
< 


.g 

cg 

O 

d 

'o 


A 

o 

W2 
«w 

o 

i 

i 

g 

> 
< 


O 

E 
| 

«o 

u 

> 
O 

6 


u 

P 

6 


Si 

2 a 

o 

6 
8 


u 
1 

o 

"3 

3 

m 




SPRING. 




















Centre, 


( S. Augusta Dole, 
) Clara Wetherbee, 


24 


$19.00 


$47.50 


.36 


31 


1 





00 


11 


2i 


15.00 


37.50 


37 


35 





3 


00 


12 


West, 


( Sophia Harris, 

{ Carrie E. Mayhew, 


24 


20.00 


50.00 


36 


31 


1 





00 


4 


24 


16.00 


40.00 


46 


35 





5 


00 


1 


South, 


( Martha C. Harris, 
| Lottie C. Faulkner, 


24 


19.00 


47.50 


49 


40 


1 





00 


9 


n 


16.00 


36.00 


46 


34 





9 


00 


9 


East, 


S. Augusta Davis, 


n 


19.00 


61.75 


34 


29 





1 


00 


1 


S. East, 


Nellie J. Fletcher, 


3 


18.00 


54.00 


39 


32 


1 





00 


11 


North, 


Jennie M. Harris, 


24 


19.00 


47.50 


32 


26 


1 


2 


00 


7 




234 


$161.00 


$421.75 


335 


293 


5 


20 








FALL. 




















Centre, 


( S. Augusta Dole, 
I Clara Wetherbee, 


24 


$18.00 


$45.00 


33 


28 


3 





40 


9 


24 


15.00 


37-50 


38 


35 








50 


8 


West, 


( Sophia Harris, 

{ Carrie E. Mayhew, 


24 


20.00 


50.00 


38 


31 


1 







4 


24 


16.00 


40.00 


53 


47 





6 


50 


5 


South 


( Martha C. Harris, 
( Lottie C. Faulkner, 


24 


19.00 


47.50 


47 


39 


2 





40 


6 


24 


16.00 


40.00 


47 


37 





4 


50 


12 


East, 


S. Augusta Davis, 


24 


19.00 


47.50 


38 


32 


1 


3 


25 


1 


S. East, 


Nellie J. Fletcher, 


3 


18.00 


54.00 


40 


36 


1 





20 


6 


North, 


Jennie M. Harris, 


2 


19.00 


38.00 


31 


25 


1 


3 




6 




224 


$160.00 


$399.50 


366 


310 


9 


16 








WINTER. 




















Centre, 


Luther Conant, 


U 


$40.00 


$120.00 


54 


50 


21 





30 


12 


West, 
South, 


A. Crosby Fish, 


21 


40.00 


110.00 


57 


55 


15 





200 


7 


Fred. C. Nash, 


2| 


40.00 


110.00 


52 


46 






25 


1 


East, 


S.. Augusta Davis, 


4 


26.00 


104.00 


37 


32 


4 


1 


60 


2 


S. East, 


Geo. T. Wiggin, 


3 


40.00 


120.00 


39 












North, 


L. V. N. Peck, 


3 


40.00 


120.00 


45 


40 


18 


2 


40 






184 


$226.00 


$684.00 


284 


223 


53 


3 








WINTER PRIMARY. 




















Centre, 


Clara Wetherbee, 


3 


16.00 


$48.00 


41 


36 







20 


5 


South, 


Lottie E. Faulkner, 


2| 


18.00 


49.50 


52 


44 






60 


7 


West, 


Carrie E. Mayhew, 


2| 


18.00 


49,50 


49 


40 






80 


9 




84 


$52.00 


$147.10 


142120 







TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



In obedience to a vote of the town, the following 
report is subjoined. It will be seen that all the 
details which by law are required to be collected and 
recorded by the Town Clerk, have not been given. 
Perhaps it would be improper to do so. 

Such items as are of general interest, it is believed, 
will be found embodied therein. In this connection, 
the attention of those upon whom the responsibility 
rests, is called to the importance of having as full and 
perfect returns of all Births, Deaths, and Marriages, 
that occur in town, as possible, that our records may 
be reliable and complete. 

Persons noticing any errors or omissions, will con- 
fer a favor by giving notice thereof to the Clerk. 

BIRTHS IN ACTON IN 1861. 

Jan'y 7, — A son to Orra and Catherine Boncey. 
" 9, Carrie Etta, daughter of Aaron C. and Harriet 

Handley. 
" 11, Carrie Evelyn, daughter of Edwin and Mary 

Fletcher. 
« id, Sarah Elizabeth, daughter of John and Eliza A. 

Phillips. 
" 21, Daniel, son of Dennis and Betsey Shehan. 
" 31, Cora, daughter of Frederick and Sarah Bouil- 

lard. 



29 

Feb. 16, Albert L. Brooks, son of Henry and Harriet E. 
Brooks. 
" 18, Charles Ellis, son of Charles and Percis P. Rob- 
inson. 
Albert F., son of Simon and Nancy D. Robbins. 
A son to Andrew and Eliza Hapgood. 
Mar. 16, Lottie Evelina, daughter of Reuben and Caro- 
line M. Handley. 
Harry V., son of Yarnum and Sarah L. Tuttle. 
In Townsend, Geo. P., son of Yarnum B. and 

D. Elizabeth Mead. 

Edgar Henry, son of Enoch and Emeline Hall. 

Milton Lewis, son of Thomas and Martha Tay- 
lor. 

Usher Jones, son of Francis and Charlotte L. 

Brown. 
A son to Reuben and Lydia Green. 
May 4, Loretta Tuttle, daughter of John E. and Emma 

E. Hosmer. 
Fred Augustus, son of Augustus and Carrie A. 

Hosmer. 

Charles Eddy, son of George W. and Caroline 
B. Bradford. 

James William, son of James and Joanna Ogle. 

David Thomas, son of Richard and Eliza Kins- 
ley. 
June 15, John, son of Daniel and Elizabeth Jane Mur- 

pky- 

" 17, Pierce, son of John and Eliza Powers. 
July 17, Mary, daughter of Michael and Ellen Phalen. 
" 25, George Leonard, son of David W. and Harriet 

Hosmer. 
" 26, Cordelia Elizabeth, daughter of Joel F. and 
Sarah E. Haywood. 
Aug. 7, Michael, son of John and Julia McCarthy. 
" 13, Mary Helen, daughter of James and Margaret 
Todd. 



a 


25, 


a 


26, 


Mar. 


16, 


a 


W. 


a 


18, 


a 


25, 


April 


2, 


a 


12, 


a 


29, 


May 


4, 


a 


5, 


a 


5, 


a 


16, 


a 


22, 



30 

Aug. 25, Frank Ellsworth, son of George M. and Char- 
lotte Maria Pike. 
Sept. 17, Ellen Elizabeth, daughter of Martin B. and Hen- 
rietta Moore. 
" 17, A son to Henry and Adeline Haynes. 
" 17, Mary Spaulding, daughter of Elisha H. and 
Mary E. Cutler. 
Oct. 8, A son to Gilbert T. and Sarah A. Webber. 
" 26, Albert, son of Thomas and Maria Russell. 
Nov. 1, Margaret, daughter of Thomas and Mary Ann 
Dane. 
" 9, Harriet Eliza, daughter of John and Laura A. 

Johnston. 
" 16, Rosanna, daughter of Marian and Rosa Miner. 
Dec. 4, Bernard, son of Michael and Margaret Harring- 
ton. 
25 males, and 14 females. 
Total 39. 



MARRIAGES RECORDED IN 1861. 

Date of Marriage Names of the Parties. 

1. Jan. 20 — William F. Newton of Marlborough, and 

Nellie A. Wheeler of Acton. 

2. Feb. 13 — Elias E. Haynes and Abby E. Wright, both 

of Concord. 

3. Feb. 21 — Asaph Parlin, Jr., and Candace M. Pike, both 

of Acton. 

4. Feb. 24 — Joseph F. Carr of Acton, and Emerline M. 

Pierce of Jaffrey, N. H. 

5. April 7 — T. Frederick Noyes and Sarah C. Livermore, 

both of Acton. 

6. May 2 — William E. Stearns and Carrie E. Lothrop, 

both of Acton. 

7. May 8 — James Miller of Sutton, C. E., and Ann 

Maria Craven of Sudbury. 



31 

8. May 24 — "Winthrop E. "Wood and Lydia Ann Bruce, 

both of Acton. 

9. June 19 — James L. Parker of Acton, and Frances Em- 

eline Goding of Sudbury. 

10. July 3 — Calvin Cummings and Eliza A. Brown, both 

of Acton. 

11. Aug. 2 — Gustavus D. Pike of Topsfield, and Sarah 

Jane Tuttle of Acton. 

12. Aug, 22 — George A. Faxon and Minnie C. Ingalls,both 

of Boston. 

13. Sept. 1 — Samuel Patch, Jr., of "Weston, and Elizabeth 

Jane Noyes of Concord. 

14. Oct. 11 — David W. Hapgood of Boston, and Ann M. 

Stockwell of Acton. 

15. Oct. 13 — Albert T. Edmonds and Sarah A. Sawyer, 

both of Acton. 

16. Oct. 20 — Daniel F. Tarbell of Acton, and Georgiana 

Saunders of Sudbury. 

17. Nov. 7 — Levi Wetherbee and Mrs. Abigail Chaffin, 

both of Acton. 

18. Dec. 3 — Solomon Fletcher of Groton, and Mary Sophia 

Phillips of Acton. 

19. Dec. 8 — Charles H. Tuttle of Boston, and Loretta 

Tuttle of Acton. 



DEATHS IN 1861. 

Date of Death. 

Jan'y 2 — Mrs. Eunice Conant, wife of Abraham Conant, 

Esq., aged 67 years. 
Feb'y 16 — Hattie Skinner, daughter of Benjamin and Sarah 
Skinner, aged 5 years. 
" 17 — Aaron, son of Charles and Ann Wheeler, aged 

2 years 2 months. 
« 22 — Dolly Smith, widow of Ebenezer Smith, aged 90 
years. 



32 

March 1 — Caroline F. Wheeler, daughter of Jona and Mary 
A. Wheeler, aged 20 years. 
" 10 — Mrs. Betsy Brown, widow of Nath'l G. Brown, 

aged 77 years. * 

" 16 — Charles A. Faulkner, son of Winthrop E. and 

Martha A. Faulkner, aged 18 years. 
" 18 — Lucy Oliver, widow of Abijah Oliver, aged 83 
years. 
April 11 — Calvin F. Piper, son of Calvin W. and Dolly M. 
Piper, aged 6 years. 
" 23 — Captain Silas Jones, son of Aaron Jones, aged 74 

years. 
" 14 — Lena, daughter of Christine and Louisa Her- 
mann, aged 2 years. 
May 6 — Mr. Edward Wetherbee, senior, aged 79 years. 
" 22 — Mr. Jedediah Tuttle, aged 76 years. 
" 24 — John W. Schouler, son of William and Elizabeth 

Schouler, aged 2 years. 
" 30 — William A Schouler, son of William and Susan 
Schouler, aged 10 years. 
June 4 — Edson H., son of Henry and Louisa Barker, 
aged 1 year. 
" 12 — Mrs. Louisa W. Adams, wife of Nathaniel S. 

Adams, aged 48 years. 
" 12 — Mrs. Clarinda B. Pickens, wife of Bradford 

Pickens, aged 31 years. 
" 16 — Margaret Conolly, daughter of Patrick and Kate 

Conolly, aged 3 years. 
« 24 — Kate Conolly, daughter of Patrick and Kate 
Conolly, aged 17 years 6 months. 
July 23 — Ann Conolly, daughter of Patrick and Kate Con- 
olly, aged 5 years. 
Aug't 20 — Abraham Conant, Esq., aged 77 years 10 mos. 
« 21 — Mr. Joel Wright, aged 68 years 1 month. 
« 24 — Eoscoe P. Walker, son of Samuel and Harriet 
Walker, aged 10 years. 



33 

Aug. 28 — Francis T. Robbins, son of Francis and Nancy 

Bobbins, aged 9 years 
Sept'r 9 — Harry V., son of Varnum and Sarah L. Tuttle, 
aged 5 months. 
" 12 — Mrs. Abby K. Farnum, daughter of Jonas K. and 

Phebe Putney, aged 29 years. 
" 13 — Mr. Emery P. Smith, aged 29 years 6 months. 
" 17 — Miss Jennie M. Keith, aged 19 years 1 month. 
" 19 — Sargent "W. Adams, son of Nathaniel S. and 

Lucy W. Adams, aged 22 years. 
" 19 — E. Lucian Bobbins, son of Silly and Joanna Rob- 
bins, aged 22 years. 
Oct'r 1 — Mr. Lemuel Hildreth, (a native of "Westford), 
aged 80 years. 
" 26 — Albert F., son of Simon and Nancy D. Robbins, 

aged 8 months. 
u 27 — John Hannon, son of Michael and Mary Hannon, 
aged 7 years. 
Nov'r 1 — Atwood Mortimer, son of Alonzo L. and Eleanor 
Tuttle, aged 3 years 9 months. 
« 30 — Augustus Hosmer, son of Samuel Hosmer of 
Harvard, aged 28 years. 
Total, - - - - - 36 

WM. D. TUTTLE, Town Cleric. 



:4 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT, 

FROM 

FEBRUARY 26, 1861, TO FEBRUARY 26, 1862. 



RECEIPTS. $7321 49 



EXPENDITURES. 

SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 
Paid James Keyes for N. East School, $220 00 
James E. Billings, for East School, 220 00 
W. A. Wilde, for. S. East School, 220 00 
Dr. H. Cowdrey, for Centre School, 370 85 
A. Fuller, for West School, 370 85 

E. F. Fuller, for South School, 370 84 

f 1772 54 



REPAIRS ON SCHOOL HOUSES. 
Paid Jas. Keyes, Jr., for repairs on North 

school house, $2 00 

G. T. Webber, for stove pipe for the 

South school house in 1860, 3 06 

Do., for stove and pipe for the South 

East school house, 18 74 

Eben Davis, for repairs on East school 

house, 2 00 

A. Fuller, for repairs on West school 

house, 3 15 

F. Dwight, for labor and material for 

South school house, in April, 1861, 5 28 
Do., do., in Sept. and Dec, 9 38 



$43 61 



35 

SCHOOL BOOKS, PRINTING, Etc. 

Paid for printing report of school commit- 
tee for '60, '61, $28 00 
Dr. H. Cowdrey, for school books for 

the year '60, 30 00 

W. D. Tuttle, for printing and re- 
cording by-laws, 4 00 
J. Tuttle & Co., for order book, 1 87 
B. Tolman, for printing town warrants, 8 50 
" " selectmen's rep't, '61, 7 50 
" " overseer's do., '61, 4 00 
Dr. Cowdrey, for examining teachers, 
superintending schools, and writing 
report for '60, '61, 
D. Wetherbee, for tax book, 
W. D. Tuttle, express and postage on 

books, 
B. Tolman, printing notices, 

" <{ warrant for town 

meeting, 



60 00 


4 00 


L 

2 91 


1 25 


L 

1 50 



$153 53 



REPAIRS ON TOWN BUILDINGS, Etc. 

Paid J. M. Wright, 4 1-2 days' labor re- 
pairing buildings on town farm, $6 75 
Windows and lumber for same, 1 80 

J. M. Wright, new hearse house, 125 00 
Windows and blinds for same, 6 00 

T. G. F. Jones, painting flag-staff and 

railing around the monument, 6 08 

A. & O. W. Mead, 7 M. shingles for 

the town farm buildings, 21 00 

Geo. H. Harris, oiling railing in town hall, 25 

$166 88 



36 



ABATEMENT AND DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 
Paid W. E. Conant, abatement on taxes/60, $18 90 
" " discount on taxes, 248 14 



$267 04 



ROADS AND ^BRIDGES. 



Paid J. W. Livermore, breaking roads, '61, $3 00 
Nathan Brooks, 52 hours, " " 
Daniel Fletcher, 342 " « « 
Samuel Hosmer, 59 " « « 
L. W. Piper, 61 « 
A. L. Tuttle, 198 « 
Moses Hayward, 135 " " " 
Geo. C. Wright, 264 " « " 
A. A. Tuttle, 108 " 
J. W. Teel, 157 « « 
Charles Wheeler, 44 « « " 
E. C. Parker, 32 hours' breaking roads, 
Henry Brooks, 106 " 
Chas. Tuttle, 201 « 
Thomas Taylor, 18 « 
W. H. Reed, 10 « 
A. S. Fletcher, " 
J. W. Wheeler, 22 " 
Francis Kinsley, sluice in road near 

D. Wetherbee's, '56, 
Francis Kinsley, interest on same, 

" " building road in S. 

Acton, 111 00 

Henry Haynes, repairs on roads, 1859, 

'60, 3 50 

Martin Pike, repairs on road near 

Robbins' mill, 14 75 

D. Harris, repairs and railing bridge 

near do., 8 00 
Amount carried forward, $375 03 



6 50 


42 75 


7 37 


7 62 


24 75 


16 86 


33 00 


13 50 


19 62 


5 50 


4 00 


13 25 


25 12 


2 25 


1 25 


80 


2 75 


6 00 


1 89 



37 

Amount brought forward, $375 03 

H. Brooks, repairs on road near J. 

Whitney's, 8 00 

Carles Tuttle, repairs on road near 

town farm, 12 12 

Daniel Fletcher, stone and work on 

bridge near the powder mill, 73 82 

Do., repairs on bridge near Dwight's 

factory, 2 00 

G. W. Gates, lumber for powder mill 

bridge, 29 39 

Cyrus Fletcher, lumber and work on 

do., 52 41 

Geo. L. Prescott, lumber, do., 21 21 

1858, 1 89 
A. A. Tuttle, repairs on road near E. 

C. Brown's, 7 62 

E. Davis, railing bridge near L. Davis', 5 00 

" repairs on bridge near A. 

Chaffin's, 5 00 

M. Hannon, grading S. Acton and 

Assabet road, 61 00 

George Conant, gravel for same, 18 00 

Town of "Westford, running line and 

setting stone post between West- 
ford and Acton, 63 
Do., between Carlisle and Acton, 2 40 
Setting stone posts between Littleton 

and Acton, 1 28 

A. S. Fletcher, stone posts for new r'd, 1 60 

" " « " town line, 3 00 

railing on Dwight bridge, 75 

$682 15 



(( • u 



38 

APPROPRIATION FOR SOLDIERS AND FAMILIES. 

Paid W. E. Faulkner, for Acton Davis 

Guards, $203 70 

W. E. Faulkner, for families of do., 220 15 
A. Fuller, reception of do., 334 15 

Z. Taylor, for soldier's families, 1039 86 
Horace Tuttle,for carrying 23 soldiers 

to Lowell on the 16th April, '61, 11 50 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 

Paid Daniel Tuttle, for support of poor, 

'60, '61, $171 00 

W. F. Conant, balance as per over- 
seers' report, '61, 39 37 



TOWN OFFICERS. 



$210 37 



PaidD.W. Tuttle, services as town clerk, $15 00 
" " collecting and record'g 

41 births, 8 20 

" " recording 42 deaths, 6 20 

" " " 19 marrriages, 1 90 

" " issuing 4 dog licenses, 40 

Zoheth Taylor, services as selectman, 20 00 
" " running lines and es- 
tablishing bounds between West- 
ford, Carlisle, Littleton, Boxboro', 
Concord, Acton, 7 00 

Zoheth Taylor, receiving and paying 

out aid to soldiers' families, 10 00 
Alden Fuller, services as selectman, 17 00 
Jonas K. Putney, do., do., 15 00 
" " running and estab- 
Amount carried forward, $100 70 



39 



Amount brought forward, $100 70 

lishing town lines between West- 
ford, Carlisle, Littleton, 3 00 

Dan'l Wetherbee, services as assessor, 
4 days, 

James Tuttle, do., do., 7 days, 

W. D. Tuttle, do., do., 7 1-2 days, 
" " copying taxes, 

" " assessor's returns, 

W. F. Conant, collector, 
u " constable, 



6 00 


10 50 


1125 


2 00 


1 50 


75 00 


4 00 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 



6 30 


5 85 


6 00 


1 17 


42 



$213 95 



Paid Eben. Conant, interest on note, $106 83 
~W. F. Conant, journey to pay interest, 1 00 
George W. Sawyer, tolling bell for 17 

deaths in '60, '61, 3 40 

Geo. W. Sawyer, tolling bell for 10 

deaths in '61, '62, 2 00 

Eri Huggins, do., 9 do., '60, '61, 1 80 

A. T. Edmonds, do.. 6 do., '61, '62, 1 20 
J. E. Harris, do., 16 do., '61, '62, 3 20 

P. Tenny, for insuring town house, 38 50 
W. D. Tuttle, running line between 

Acton and Boxboro', 2 00 

Do., surveying and making sketch of 

burying ground, 5 00 

Sawyer & Edmonds, 10 1-2 gallons 

fluid for town hall, 
Do., opening town hall 13 times, 
Do., teachers' institute, 
Do., opening town hall 7 times, 
Do., broom, 
Amount carried forward, $184 67 



40 



Amount brought forward, $184 67 

Horace Tuttle, opening town hall, 

teaming safe, ringing bell, etc., 6 00 
C. Twitchell, repairs on hearse, 2 85 
Daniel Tuttle, digging graves and at- 
tending funerals for 27 persons, 43 74 
Do., returning 28 deaths, 2 80 
Edwin Sawyer, hearse runners, 30 00 
" " fitting same to body, 1 00 



$271 06 



CONDITION OF THE TREASURY, Feb. 26, 1862. 
RECEIPTS. 

Balance in the treasury Feb. 26, 1861, 

State Military Bounty, 1860, 

State, for armory rent, 1860, 

State tax, 1861, 

County tax, 1861, 

Town grant, 1861, 

Highway deficiencies, 

Overlay on taxes, 

State School Fund, 

Use of town hall, 

Dog tax, 

Town of Boxboro', 

Grass on town common, 

$7321 49 



$1259 25 


367 00 


50 00 


303 00 


880 24 


4200 00 


10 57 


164 57 


72 54 


6 32 


4 00 


2 50 


150 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for support of schools, 

repairs on school houses, 
school books and printing, 
repairs on town buildings, etc., 

Amount carried forward, 


1772 54 

43 61 

153 53 

166 88 



$2136 56 



41 



Amount brought forward, $2136 56 

abatement and discount on taxes, 267 04 
roads and bridges, 682 15 

appropriations for soldiers and aid 



of soldiers' families, 


1809 36 




support of poor, '60, '61, 


210 37 




town officers, 


213 95 




miscellaneous expenses, 


271 06 




State Tax, 


303 00 




County Tax, 


880 24 


$6773 73 


in the treasury Feb. 26, 1862, 


$547 76 



FINANCIAL CONDITION OF THE TOWN, 

Fef, 26, 1862. Dr. 

To balance, as per report, Feb. 26, '62, $547 76 

Amount due from the State for aid fur- 
nished families of soldiers, under Act 
Chap. 222 of 1861, and payable about 
July, '62, 1194 21 

Am't due from State for armory rent, '61, 50 00 

$1791 97 

Cr. 

Amount due Eben Conant, on note, $1000 00 
Interest on the note, 40 00 

$1040 00 



Balance in favor of the town, Feb. 26, 1862, $751 97 

Without including the balance due as per overseer's report 

for 1862. 

ZOHETH TAYLOR, ) Selectmen 
ALDEN FULLER, i of 
JONAS K. PUTNEY, ) Acton. 



ANNUAL 

EEPORT OF THE SELECTMEN 

OF THE 

TOWN OF ACTON, 

FEOM FEB. 26, 1862, TO FEB. 26, 1863: 

A3iT> THB 

REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



ALSO, THB 



REPORT OF TOWN CLERK, 



A>1> THE 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 



FOR THE YEAR 1862-3, 



CONCORD: 

PRINTED BY BENJAMIN TOLMAN , 
1863. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



RECEIPTS. 



Amount received, $21,264 34 



EXPENDITURES. 



SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 
Paid. 

George C. Wright, for West School, $336 93 

Emerson F. Fuller, for South School, 336 93 

Jonas Blodgett, for Centre School, 336 93 

Daniel F. Tarbell, for South East School, 200 33 

James Keyes, for North School, 200 33 

James E. Billings, for East School, 200 33 

Town of Littleton, for tuition, 5 50 











REPAIRS ON SCHOOL HOUSES. 


Paid. 






For repairs 


on the North School House, 


$8 83 


«< <( 


11 Centre School House, 


30 91 


(< <( 


11 West School House, 


22 25 


«< << 


" South School House, 


30 40 


<< it 


South East School House, 


7 21 



$1,617 28 



$99 60 



SCHOOL BOOKS, PRINTING, &c. 
Paid. 

For Printing Reports of Selectmen, Town Clerk, 

and School Committee, $42 00 

For Printing Reports of Selectmen and Over- 
seers of Poor, 

For Printing Town Warrants, 
" " Notices of war meetings, &c, 

Voting List, 

William D. Tuttle, for Tax Book, 

James Tuttle & Co., for Order Book, 

Dr. Harris Cowdrey, for examining teachers, 
superintending schools, and writing report 
for 1861-2, 

Express, postage, &c, 



11 50 


10 50 


8 50 


5 00 


2 17 


3 50 


60 00 


6 23 



$149 40 



ABATEMENT AND DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 
Paid. 
W. F. Conant, abatement on Taxes, $44 55 

J. E. Cutter, discount on Taxes, 296 57 



$341 12 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

Paid. 
Daniel Fletcher, for repairs on Powder Mill 

Bridge, $53 00 

Nathan L. Pratt, for stone and teaming for 

Powder Mill Bridge, 
Elisha H. Cutler, for repairing sluice, 

" land damage for new road, 

Simon Hosmer, 
Barker & Noyes, " 

Elisha H. Cutler, for breaking roads 21 hours, 
James W. Wheeler, do., 8 hours, 
Joseph Estabrook, do., 54 hours, 
Martin Pike, do., 38 hours, 
Luther Conant, Jr., do., 73 hours, 
Albert A. Tuttle, do., 28 1-2 hours, 
A. L. Tuttle, do., Ill hours, 
Henry Brooks, do., 38 hours, 
James E. Billings, do., 16 hours, 
Winthrop F. Conant, for building 95 rods wall, 

at $1,20 per rod, 
Do., for stone for railing, 



12 87 


2 00 


75 00 


105 00 


10 00 


2 62 


1 00 


6 75 


4 75 


9 12 


3 56 


13 87 


4 75 


2 00 


114 00 


3 50 



$423 79 



5 



APPROPRIATION FOR SOLDIERS AND FAMILIES. 

Paid. 
For State aid to families, $2,576 25 

Bounties to 23 three years' volunteers, 2,875 00 
Bounties to 38 nine months' volunteers, 3,800 00 



$9,251 25 



APPROPRIATION FOR TOWN BUILDINGS. 

Paid the Town Hall Building Committee, $1,500 00 



» 

SUPPORT OF POOR. 




Paid. 




Winthrop F. Conant, support of Widow Lewis 




Chaffin, for 1861, 


$10 75 


" clothing for Geo. Bullard, 




for 1861, 


8 20 


for Philips family for 1861, 


22 21 


for Alfred Brown, for 1861 


, 4 00 


for Mary A. Law, for 1861 


., 1 75 


" for aid granted foreigners 




for 1861, 


2 00 


for Noah A. Gray, 


1 81 


Jas. E. Billings, for Elmira Johnson, for 1861, 


7 14 


" for Sarah Childs and Adaline 




Bobbins, for 1861, 


12 00 


for John Whitney, for 1862, 


4 53 


J. K. W. Wetherbee, for Alfred Brown, for 




1862, 


3 00 


for Mary N. Smith, for 




1861-2, 


41 81 


" for Charles Puffer for 




1862, 


61 81 


0. J. Davis, for services on Town Farm, 


95 97 


" for wardrobe, 


6 00 


J. K. Putney, for 2 cows for Town Farm, 


62 00 


J. Tuttle, & Co., merchandise for Town Farm, 


179 63 


Daniel Jones, for merchandise for Town Farm, 


19 67 







TOWN OFFICERS. 
Paid. 

William D. Tuttle, services as Town Clerk, $15 00 

• " col. and recording 43 births, 8 60 



$544 28 



William D. Tuttle, recording 33 deaths, 

" recording 17 marriages, 

James E. Billings, services as Selectman, 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, do., 
Jonas K. Putney, do., 

Wm. D. Tuttle, services as Assessor, 9 1-2 days, 
James W. Wheeler, do., 7 1-2 days, 
Eben Davis, do., 

Wm. D. Tuttle, making Assessors' returns, 
Winthrop F. Conant, collecting Taxes, 

" services as Overseer of Poor 

Daniel Tuttle, do., 

' ' journey to C ambridge and Harvard, 

Simon Hosmer, do., 
For making report of Overseers for 1861, 



$5 30 


1 70 


35 00 


25 00 


8 00 


14 25 


10 75 


9 00 


1 00 


75 00 


•, 4 00 


a5 00 


, 4 50 


5 00 


5 00 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 
Paid. 

Eben Conant, Interest on Note, 
Concord Bank, Note and Interest, 
Prescott Bank, Note and Interest, 
Albert T. Edmonds, for opening Town Hall, 
11 times, 
" for opening Vestry 3 times, 

" for sawing and splitting 

9 feet wood, 
Henry Hartwell, opening Town Hall 12 times, 
11 6 gallons fluid, 

" tolling bell for 10 deaths, 

A. T. Edmonds, tolling bell for 5 deaths, 
James Harris, for wood for Town Hall, 
John Grimes, for wood for Town Hall, 
H. J. Hapgood, tolling bell for 5 deaths, 
J. Blodgett, for stakes for lotting out burying 

ground, 
Thomas Moore, for 21 1-2 days' work on burying 

ground, 
T. G. F. Jones, for damage caused by dog, 
Isaiah B. Perkins, damage caused by dog, 
George M. Brooks, for advice respecting Dog 

Law, &c, 7 00 

Joseph Haynes, for damage, caused by snow on 

highway, 8 00 



$60 00 


2,915 95 


507 75 


3 40 


, 1 50 


1 60 


3 40 


5 04 


2 00 


1 00 


2 15 


2 31 


1 00 


2 00 


26 87 


37 03 


20. 57 



$242 10 



Charles D. Francis, for damage caused from 

upsetting carriage by the causway near the 

Powder Mills, 
Winthrop F. Conant, for summoning 37 persons 

to take oath of office, 
Zoheth Taylor, for expense in the Robert Chaf- 

fin dog case, 
John Tenney, for digging graves and attending 

funerals with hearse. 
George E. Johnson, for repairs on hearse, 
Elbridge Robbins, for land for burying ground 

and interest, 
Recruiting expenses, 
Francis Dwight, expenses on hearse, 

" digging graves and attending 

funerals for 28 persons, 
Francis Dwight, for returning 32 deaths, 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, for 2 ballot boxes, 
Wm. D. Tuttle, notifying Highway Surveyors 

to pass over books to their successors, 



$188 25 

4 50 

17 00 

9 90 
6 50 



305 34 

'46 32 

75 


45 36 
3 20 
1 50 


s 

50 



?4 



f-C 



$4,237 69 



CONDITION OF THE TREASURY, FEB. 26, 1863. 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance in the Treasury, Feb. 26, 1862, $547 77 

State Tax, 1862, 1,818 00 

County Tax, 1862, 747 03 

Town Grant, 1862, 2,000 00 

Town Grant for Schools, 1,500 00 

State School Fund, 79 78 

Highway Deficiencies, 16 21 

Overlay on Taxes, 148 62 

Dog Tax, 53 10 

For use of Town Hall, 3 90 

For Monument Books, 1 80 

For old Hearse House, 4 00 

City of Boston, for Paupers, 50 62 

Grass on Town Common, 1 62 

Town of Sudbury, for Tuition, 15 00 

Town of Concord, 22 50 
Town of Sudbury, for support of'Chas. Puffer, 61 81 

Insurance of Town Hall, 1,500 00 



From Town Farm, 


$32 19 


From State, for Armory rent, 1861, 


50 00 


State aid to Jan. 1, 1862, 


731 05 


Borrowed money, 


11,879 34 




<t01 OC/| o\ 




' spi£±,.£U'± OHt 


EXPENDITURES 




For Support of Schools, 


$1,617 28 


Repairs on School Houses, 


99 60 


School Books, Printing, &c, 


149 40 


Abatement and Discount on Taxes, 


341 12 


Roads and Bridges, 


423 79 


Appropriations for soldiers and Aid for 


soldiers' families, 


9,251 25 


Appropriations for Town Buildings, 


1,500 00 


Support of Poor, 


544 28 


Town Officers, 


242 10 


Miscellaneous expenses, 


4,237 69 


State Tax, 


1,818 00 


County Tax, 


747. 03 




<tOA f)71 P.A 






Balance in Treasury Feb. 26, 1863, 


$292 80 



FINANCIAL CONDITION OF THE TOWN, FEB. 26, 1863. 

Dr. 

To balance, as per report, Feb. 26, 1863, $292 80 

Amount due from the State for aid furnished 

families of soldiers, 2,952 35 

Amount due from State, Armory rent, 1862, 50 00 

$3,295 15 



Cr. 

Amount due on Notes, $9,479 34 

Interest on Notes, 286 25 

$9,765 59 



Balance against the Town Feb. 26, 1863, $6,470 44 

without including the balance due as per Overseers' report for 1863. 

JAMES E. BILLINGS, ) 

JONAS K. PUTNE7, [ Selectmen of Acton. 

J. K. W. WETHERBEE, ) 



REPORT 



OF THE 
I 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES, 

AT THE 

ALMSHOUSE, IN ACTON, 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING APRIL 1, 1863. 



Articles on Hand, April 1st, 1863. 

1 pair oxen, $125; 1 horse, 70,00 ; 10 cows, 275,00, 

3 shotes, 35,00 j 20 fowls, 7,50 ; 7 tons hay, 105,00, 

35 bushels corn, 35,00; 75 bushels potatoes; 33,75, 

10 bush, oats, 7,00; 6 bush, barley, 6,00; 2 bush, beans 5,00, 

1 bush, peas, 1,50 ; 75 lbs. beef, 5,25 ; 375 lbs. pork, 37,50, 

110 lbs. ham, 11,00; 72 lbs. lard, 8,64; 40 lbs. candles, 6,00, 

61 lbs. dried apples, 3,66; 5 bbls. apples, 5.00, 

1 bbl. soap, 4,00; 1 bbl. vinegar, 4,00; soap grease, 1,25, 

6 lbs. tallow, .60 ; 69 M skewers, 24,15 ; 10 bush, ashes, 1/25 

Wood for skewers, 



$470 00 


147 50 


68 75 


18 00 


, 44 25 


25 64 


8 66 


9 25 


, 26 00 


4 00 



$822 05 



RECEIPTS. 

For oxen, $236,68 ; cows, $30,00 ; calves, 33,68, 
Apples, 162,09; peaches, 11,50; potatoes, 36,93, 
Poultry, 18,89; hay, 42,42; straw, 6,08; grapes, .50, 
Eggs, 8,74; oats, 11,50; corn, .68; old iron, 1,58, 
1 shote, 4.00 ; hide, 4,41 ; use of oxen, .40, 
Skewers, 59,62; milk, 257,91, 



Amount of articles on hand, 



$300 


36 


210 


52 


67 


89 


22 


50 


8 


81 


317 


53 


$927 


61 


822 


05 


$1,749 66 



10 



EXPENDITURES. 

Meat, $61,75; butter, 48,41; molasses, 21,25, $131 41 

Farming tools, 23,87 ; flour, 37,05; cheese, 16,03, 76 95 

Sugar, 9,96; tea, 4,88; coffee, 7,88; fish, 8,28, 31 00 

Fluid, 2,68; kerosene oil, .38; tobacco, 7,03, 10 09 

Bread, 3,22; blacksmith's bill, 17,60; barrels, 18,37, 39 19 

Expense of going to market, 23,£1 ; earthenware, 6,49, 30 10 

Peas, .57; beans, 2,74; brooms, .75; nails, 1,03, 5 09 

Sour milk, 2,26; cloth and clothing, 54,84, 57 10 

Rope, 1,40; grass seed, 2,56; garden seeds, 1,17, 5 13 

Salt, 4,29; apples, 4,00; raisins, .56; lime, 1,00, 9 85 

Whitewash brush, .83; trees, 2,40; use of bull, 2,25, 5 48 

Matches, .40; cash to paupers, 1,27; spirits, 1,04, 2 71 

Spices, 2,03; stove polish, .8; solder, .17; yeast, .50, 2 78 

Essences, 34; oil, 1,13; potash, 2,92; chalk, .12, 4 51 

Washboard and bucket, .50 ; weighing oxen, .12, 62 

Scraps and powder, 1,23; ox work, 2,00; ox balls, .12, 3 35 

Rice, .44; coffee mill, .50; wheel grease, .30, 1 24 

Saleratus, .34; pills, .25; camphor, .38; soap, 2,47, 3 44 

Mustard, .16; glass and putty, .46; sulphur, .40, 1 02 

Starch, .20; lemons, .17; cream tartar, .53, 90 

Vinegar and barrel, 2,60; clothes-pins, .16, 2 76 

Harness, 25,00; doctor's bill, 2,91, 27 91 

Pasturing cattle, 20,00 ; oxen, 216,00, 236 00 

Heifers, 30,00; shotes, 14,71 ; tar, .30; stone posts, 3,00, 48 01 

Lumber, 3,34; wood for skewers, 6,75; eggs, .16, 10 25 

Pump, 10,00 ; mending shoes, 4,32, 14 32 

Rye meal, 7,20 ; corn meal, 9.31, 16 51 

Shorts and oil meal, 13,44; plaster, .91, 14 35 

Newspaper, 2,00 ; use of wagon, 7,33, 9 33 

Services of Mr. and Mrs. D. H. Wetherbee, 225 00 

James E. Billings, services, 5 00 

Jonas K. Putney, " 5 00 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, services, 5 00 

$1,041 40 
Amount of Inventory, April 1st, 1862, $805 17 

Interest on Farm, 239 40 



$1,044 57 

$2,085 97 



RECAPITULATION. 

Amount of Expenditures, , $1,04140 

Amount of Receipts, 927 61 

Cash from town treasury to balance account, 113 79 

$1,041 40 



11 



•Total amount of Expenditures, 
Amount of inventory, April 1st, 1862, 
Interest on Farm, 

Total amount of Receipts, 

Amount of Inventory, April 1st, 1863, 



$1,041 40 




805 17 




239 40 






$2,085 97 




$927 61 




822 05 






$1,749 66 



$336 31 

7 00 


$329 31 
15 00 



Cr. — By work on the road, 

Expense of victualing foreigners, 

Total amount of supporting Poor in Almshouse, $314 31 

Whole number of persons (exclusive of foreigners) supported in 
the Almshouse, 6 ; average, 6 ; present number, 6 ; cost per week, 
$1,01. 



James E. Billings, ) Overseers 
Jonas K. Putney, >■ of 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, ) Poor. 
Acton, April 1, 1863. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



BIRTHS IN ACTON, IN 1862. 

No. Date of Birth. Names. 

1. Jan. 17, Martha Elizabeth Jones, daughter of Aaron M. and Au- 

gusta C. Jones. 

2. Jan. 24, Lyman Edwards Conant, son of Luther, Jr. and Celeste 

J. Conant. 

3. Feb. 5, James Francis Parker, son of James L. and Francis Em- 

eline Parker. 

4. " 7, Nettie Cora Fuller, daughter of Emerson F. and Sarah W. 

Fuller. 

5. " 7, Mary Magovern, daughter of John and Winnie Magovern. 

6. " 7, Eugene B. Jones, son of James W. and Amanda M. 

Jones. 

7. "13, Edith Maud Farrar, daughter of Henry and Lydia An- 

geline Farrar. 

8. Mar. 8, John Haggerty, son of William and Mary Haggerty. 

9. " 29, Daniel Moore, son of Thomas and Ellen Moore. 

10. " 29, Rufus Augustus Tenney, son of Rufus A. and Mary A. 

Tenney. 

11. Apr. 4, Abbie Etta Estabrook, daughter of Joseph and Nancy 

Estabrook. 

12. " 5, Carrie Josephine Jones, daughter of T. G. F. and Louisa 

0. Jones. 

13. " 5, (In Bedford,) Elmer Ellsworth Jackson, son of Loring 

M. and Hattie S. Jackson. 

14. " 8, Mary Conway, daughter of John and Julia Conway. 

15. " 14, Flora Bigelow Stearns, daughter of Horatio H. and 

Betsey A. Stearns. 

16. May 7, Ann Connolly, daughter of Patrick and Kate Connolly. 

17. " 7, Harry Howard Haynes, son of Abel Gr. and Martha A. 

Haynes. 

18. " 13, Hattie Sophia Wetherbee, daughter of Hiram W. and 

Sophia B. Wetherbee. 

19. " 19, Dora E. Curtis, daughter of Nehemiah and Martha C. 

Curtis. 

20. June 5, Alma Wilson Forbusb, daughter of Luther R. and 

Louisa M. Forbusb. 

21. " 7, Michael and Mary Hayes, twin children of Michael and 

22. " Bridget Hayes. 



13 



23. June 11, Hattie Mabel Johnson, daughter of Geo. E. and Mary 

Louesa Johnson. 

24. " 21, Alma V. Knight, daughter of George W. and Frances 

Ann Knight. 

25. " 28, Herbert Franklin Robbins^ son of Simon and Nancy D. 

Robbins. 

26. July 1, Mary Ellen Griffin, daughter of Morris and Catherine 

Griffin. 

27. " 7, A son to Francis, 2d, and Sarah E. Tuttle. 

28. " 10, Daniel Lyman Veasey, son of Daniel L. and Sarah Vea- 

sey. 

29. " 26, John Ogle, son of James D. and Joanna Ogle. 

30. " 29, Walter Eugene Frost, son of George H. and Susan M. 

Frost. 

31. Aug. 7, Julian Shaw Eayrs, son of Julian W. and M. Maria 

Eayrs. 

32. Oct. 5, George William Tuttle, son of William D. and Elizabeth 

B. Tuttle. 

33. " 6, Jerry Henry McCarthy, son of Dauiel and Mary McCar- 

thy. 

34. " 17, Abner Crosby Hoar, son of John S. and Lydia P. Hoar. 

35. " 29, Alphonso Adalbert Wyman, son of Oliver C. and Caro- 

line M. Wyman. 

36. " 29, A son to Elbridge and Mary E. Robbins. 

37. Nov. 4, Josephine Puffer, daughter of Henry and Julia Ann Puf- 

fer. 

38. " 7, Bertha Sophie Tuttle, daughter of Varnum and Sarah L. 

Tuttle. 

39. " 13, Arthur William Tayloij son of Moses and Mary E. Tay- 
l lor. 

40. " 14, Frank Ellsworth Wetherbee, son of Daniel and Clarissa 

Wetherbee. 

41. " 22, John Francis Coughlin, son of John and Margaret 

Coughlin. 

42. Dec. 15, Abbie Powers, daughter of John and Eliza Powers. 

43. " 21, Ella Elizabeth Tuttle, daughter of Alonzo L. and Ellen 

Tuttle. 
Males, 23 ; Females, 20. 



MARRIAGES RECORDED, IN 1862 

No. Date of Marriage. Names of the Parties. 

1. Jan. 1, Nathaniel E. Cutler, of Acton, and Sarah A. Cheney, 

of Georgetown. 

2. Feb. 13, Elbridge J. Robbins and Ellen Maria Ames, both 

of Acton. 



14 



3. Feb. 26, Robert H. Logan, of Concord, and Augusta 0. Conanf , 

of Acton. 

4. Mar. 1, Michael Flynn and Catherine Coughlin, both of Acton. 

5. Apr. 26, John C. Keyes, of Cambridge, and Maria Adeline 

Flagg, of Acton. 

6. May 1, Hiram B. Livermore and Laura E. Prouty, both of 

Acton. 

7. July 4, Nathan Frazier Hapgood, of Acton, and Mary McCollum, 

of Westford. 

8. Aug. 28, George B. Parker and Fanny Wheeler, both of Acton. 

9. Aug. 28, William Chaplin, Jr., and Sarah F. Simpson, both 

of Acton. 

10. Sept. 13, Josiah B. Holder and Sarah A. Sbattuck, both of Acton. 

11. Oct. 13, Daniel Mahoney and Mary McMahar, both of Acton. 

12. Nov. 25, Bradford Pickens and Louisa Angenett Noyes, both 

of Acton. 

13. Nov. 27, Horace W. French, of Abington, and Sarah Augusta 

Dole, of Acton. 

14. Nov. 27, Isaac Marion Shurtleff, of Middleborough, and Sarah 

Elmira Atwood, of Acton. 

15. Dec. 25, Isaac W. Brown and Harriet Augusta Haynes, both 

of Acton. 

16. Dec. 25, A. T. Haynes and Sophia Taylor Tuttle, both of Acton. 

17. Dec. 31, Luke Tuttle and S. Sophia Harris, both of Acton. 

In addition to the above, the following parties have obtained Certifi- 
cates of Marriage, and it is presumed have made proper use of the 
same, but the certificates not having been returned by the officiating 
clergymen, no record of them has been made by the Clerk : — 

Lewis E. Fletcher, of Acton, and Abbie J. Herrick, of Stow ; 
Thomas N. Chase, of Hanover, N. H., and Mary Maria Tuttle, of Ac- 
ton ; Augustus Newton, of Acton, and Lucy Ann Puffer, of Stow. 



DEATHS IN ACTON, IN 1862. 

No. Date of Death. Name and Age. 

1. Jan. 30, Charles H. Handley, aged 19 yrs. 

2. Feb. 1, Sarah A. Phillips, widow of William Phillips, aged 

48 yrs. 8 mos. 

3. Apl. 6, James D. Ogle, aged 27 yrs. 

4. Apl. 9, Mary Conway, daughter of John and Julia Conway, 

1 day. 



15 



5. Apl. 14, Frank Wetherbee, son of Daniel and Clarissa Wether- 

bee, aged 7 yrs. 8 mos. 

6. Apl. 15, Daniel Atwood, aged 61 yrs. 7 mos. 

7. May 14, Rufus A. Tenney, aged 33 yrs. 10 mos. 

8. May 20, Thomas D. Mallain, son of Daniel and Joanna Mallain, 

aged 5 yrs. 3 mos. 

9. June 8, Bridget Hayes, wife of Michael Hayes, aged 31 yrs. 

10. June 20, John E. Riley, son of Michael and Hannah Riley, aged 

1 yr. 6 mos. 

11. June 20, Mary Hosmer, wife of Samuel Hosmer, aged 45 yrs. 

5 mos. 

12. July 6, Cyrus Wheeler, aged 59 yrs. 5 mos. 

13. July 11, Infant child of Francis Tuttle, 2d, aged 4 days. 

14. July 22, Abigail Wetherbee, wife of Levi Wetherbee, aged 66 

yrs. 10 mos. 

15. Aug. 8, Herbert A. Frost, son of George H. and Susan M. 

Frost, aged 2 yrs. 6 mos. 

16. Aug. 20, Lucy Jane Shattuck, wife of William R. Shattuck, 

aged 33 yrs. 

17. Sept. 7, Alma V. Knight, daughter of Geo. W. and Frances 

Ann Knight, aged 2 mos. 17 days. 

18. Sept. 15, William E. Giles, son of Israel H. and Lucy Giles, 

aged 19 yrs. 5 mos. 

19. Oct. 4, Carrie A. Frederick, daughter of William A. and 

Margaret Frederick, aged 9 mos. 13 days. 

20. Oct. 14, David Sweat*, aged 58 yrs. 11 mos. 

21. Oct. 19, Mary Marshall, aged 74 yrs. 7 mos, a native of 

Tewksbury. 

22. Oct. 24, Joel Oliver, aged 84 yrs. 

23. Oct. 31, Charles E. Robinson, son of Charles and Percis V. 

Robinson, aged 1 yr. 8 mos. 

24. Nov. 25, Elisha Comstock, aged 72 yrs. 7 mos. 

25. Nov. 14, Sally Bright (widow), aged 74 yrs. 

26. Dec. 25, Michael Quinn, aged 55 yrs. 

Soldiers in the United States Service. 

27. July 5, Warren R. Wheeler, son of William Wheeler, aged 21 

yrs. Died at Fort St. Phillip, near New Orleans. 

28. July 7, Frank Handley, son of Abraham B. and Susan E. 

Handley, aged 20 yrs. 11 mos. Died at Fort St. 
Phillip, near New Orleans. 

29. Sept. 1, James M. Wright, son of Abraham and Maria Wright, 

aged 35 yrs. Died in Hospital at Philadelphia. 

30. Nov. 16, James R. Lentil], son of William and Mary Lentill, 

aged 18 yrs. Died at New Orleans. 



MILITARY RECORD. 



While the present condition of our country, engaged as it is, in a 
bloody, civil war, to sustain the authority of the government and to pre- 
serve our national existence, must be deeply deplored by every one — 
paralyzing as it does our industrial interests, swallowing up the accumu- 
lated wealth of years, burdening the nation with debt and the people 
with taxes, and calling for the sacrifice of so many of our brothers and 
sons — still, when the terrible necessity comes, as come it sometimes 
will to every nation, it is a source of patriotic pride to know that we 
have so many among us, who are willing to leave their homes and fire, 
sides to encounter the dangers of the battle-field, and the more deadly 
malaria of a Southern climate, that the honor and integrity of the nation 
might be sustained, and those free institutions which were handed down 
to us by our fathers preserved, and transmitted unimpaired — a priceless 
heritage — to future generations. 

And while we gladly look forward to the time when we shall again 
united and prosperous people, when this gigantic and atrocious con- 
spiracy to compass the destruction of a government, fraught with the 
best interests of mankind, shall have been suppressed, and the condi- 
tions of a true and lasting peace fully secured, we would honor the 
names of those who, in the darker hours of our country's history, stood 
up manfully in its defence. And we have thought it well that the 
names of the men of Acton, who have gone forth in their country's ser- 
vice since the beginning of the Rebellion, should find a place here — a 
Roll of Honor — of which Acton may well be proud. 

Whole quota of Acton, 126 ; credited to Acton, 126 ; entered the 
service from Acton, 129. 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND PRIVATES, COMPANY E, 6th REGI- 
MENT MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



Wm. H. Chapman, 1st Lieut. 
George W. Rand, Id Lieut., 
Silas P. Blodgett, 3d Lieut., 
A. S. Fletcher, 4th Lieut., 



(Left April 16th; returned August 3d, 1861.) 

THREE MONTHS' VOLUNTEERS. 

Daniel Tuttle, Captain. 



Luke Smith, 1st Sergeant, 
Geo. W. Knight, 2c? Sergeant, 
Henry W. Wilder, 3c? Sergeant, 
G. W. Wilder, 4th Sergeant. 



17 



THREE MONTHS VOLUNTEERS 

Cbarles Jones, 1st Corporal, 
John F. Blood, Jr., 2d Corporal, 
Luke J. Robbins, 3d Corporal, 
Levi Robbins, \ih Corporal. 



(Continued.) 

Musicians : 

George Fay Campbell, 
George Russee. 



George F. Blood, * 
John A. Brown, * 
Henry L. Bray, — 
Charles A. Brooks, * 
Edward D, Battles, * 
James L. Durant, 
Aaron J. Fletcher, * 
Abel Farrar, Jr., — 
Henry Gilson, 
Nathan Goss, * 
William H. Gray, * 
Gilman S. Hosmer, * 
William S. Handley, * 
Charles Handley (deceased) 
George Jones, — 
Waldo Littlefield, 
Henry W. Lazell, * 
James Moulton, * 



PRIVATES. 

Charles Mcrce, * 
John Putnam, * 
Yarnum F. Robbies, — 
William Reed, — 
William B. Reed, * 
John H. P. White, * 
Charles W. Reed, 
George A. Reed, 
Luke J. Robbins, * 
Eph. A. Smith, * 
Andrew J. Sawyer, — 
Edwin Tarbell, * 
John Whitney, 
William F. B. Whitney, 
Eben F. Wood, 
Samuel Wilson, 
Hiram Wheeler, 
John Wayne. * 



Charles Moulton, * 

The above is a complete list, we believe, of Captain Tuttle's com- 
pany ; three of whom went from Stow, three from Littleton, two from 
Boxborough, one from Quincy, and one belonged to Baltimore. 

Those marked with a star, have re-enlisted for three years ; those 
with a dash, for nine months. 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND PRIVATES, COMPANY E, 26th REGI- 
MENT MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



WHO WEST FROM ACTO>" WITHOUT BOtTVTY FROM TOTV>\ 



(Went into Camp September 15th, 1861: left for Ship Island November 19th, 1861.) 



THREE YEARS MEN 
William H. Chapman, Captain, 
William F. Wood, 1st Lieut., . 
Silas P. Blodgett, 2d Lieut. 



Musicians : 
Augustus W. Hosmer, 
Silas M. Stetson. 



18 



three years' men. — (Continued.) 



PRIVATES. 



Brooks Charles A., 
Blood John F., Jr., 3 
Burroughs Samuel R., 

* Brown John A., 
Cram George B., 
Cram John B., 
Fletcher Aaron J., 
Fiske James W., 
Goss Nathan, 
Handley William S., 
Handley Abram, 
Handley Frank, 

* Handley George, 
Haynes Elias E., 
Hall Delet H., 
Hosmer Gilman S., 
Kinsley Frank, 
Loker Jona W., 
Loker William H., 
Lentill James R., 
Lazell Henry W., 
Moulton James, 
Morse Charles, 



Moore Patrick, 
Putnam John, 
Powers Michael, 
Bobbins Luke J., 
Smith Luke, 
Sheehan Timothy, 
Sawyer George W., 
Sheehan Dennis, 
* Smith Eph. A., 
Taylor Daniel G., 
Tarbell Edwin, 
Teel Warren L., 
Wood James H., 
Whitney William F. B., 
Wheeler Warren R., 
Wheeler Everett, 
Wheeler Addison, 
Wheeler Lincoln E., 
White John H. P., 
Wayne John. 

Hospital Steward: 
Wm. H. Gray (discharged), 



Those marked thus [*] were not credited to this town by the State Authorities. 



Three Years' Men, in different Kegiments, enlisting without a bounty 
from this town. 



Daniel R. Briggs, Co. B, 1st Cav., 
George M. Pike, Co. B, 1st Cav., 
*Wm. E. Pike, Co. B, 1st Cav., 
A. E. Conant, Co. F, 30th Regt., 
G. A. Jones, Co. I, 38th Regt, 
J. Keenan, Mozart Regt., N.Y., 
E. A. Jones, band of 16th Regt., 
J. Rollins, Co. D, 12th Regt., 
J. M. Wright, Co.B, 1st Bat. Inf., 
C. A. Hanscom, " " 

John Meaher, Co. I, 26th Regt., 
Chas. Moulton, Co. I, 38th Regt., 
M. Johnson, Co. F, 13th Regt., 



Eri Huggins, Co. A, 26th Regt., 
J. A. Huggins, Co. A, " 
Eri Huggins, Jr., 2d Wis. Regt., 
W. B. Gray, Co. E, 24th Regt., 
G. H. Simpson, Co. B, 13th Regt., 
R. C. Conant, Co. G, 32d Regt, 
J. A. Mead, Co. K, 39th Regt, 
G. F. Blood, Co. D, 2d Regt, 
Daniel Gray, 13th Regt., 
Daniel Lovering, 13th Regt., 
*G. I.Chapman, Co.D,llth Regt., 
Wellington Chickering, in Navy, 
Robert J. Tufts, in Navy. 



Not credited to Acton. 



19 



THREE YEARS MEN. 

VOLUNTEERS "WHO RECEIVED THE TOW>* BOUNTY. 



J). L. Yeasey, Co. A, 1st Regt., 

* E. S. Sears, 

*G. W. Parks, 

H. W. Wetherbee, Co. E, 26th 

Regt, 
W. B. Reed, Co. E, 26th Regt., 
J. W. Fitzpatrick, " 
Marivan Miner, " " 

John A. Howard, " " 

Benj. Skinner, " " 

L. M. Jackson, " " 

Edwin B. Taft, " 



M. McKinney, Co. E, 26th Regt., 
Henry Brown, " " 

* E. L. Battles, " 
*E. J. Brown, " 
Henry H. Pike, 1st Cavalry, 

H. M. Lovejoy, Co. B, 40th Regt., 
L. W. Bowers, Co. E, 33d Regt., 

* E. W. Stevens, " 

* J. Callahan, Co. F, 40th Regt., 
*0. B.Sawyer, Co.B, 

* A. A. Sawyer, <: " 

* Frank Burns, " " 



The above went to fill the first quota of Acton, twenty-three in 
number. 

Those marked thus L*] were recruited from other towns, and not credited to Acton. 



Nine Months' Men who received the town bounty, forming a part of 
Company E, 6th Regiment. 

(Enlisted August 31st, 1862; time expires May 31st, 1863.) 



Aaron C. Handley, Captain, 
Aaron S. Fletcher, 1st Lieut., 
Geo. W. Rand, 2d Lieut., 
Geo. W. Knight, 1st Sergeant, 
Andrew J. Sawyer. 2c? " 
F. H. Whitcomb, 3d 
Levi H. Robbins, 4th 
Isaiah Hutchins, Corporal, 
William Morrill, 



Frank E. Harris, Corporal, 
AbelFarrar, Jr., 
Henry L. Bray, " 

Yarnum F. Robbins, " 

Daniel H. Farrar, Musician. 

Wm. D. Clark, Wagoner. 



George T. Ames, 
Hiram Butters, 
Charles H. Blood, 
Elbridge Conant, 
William Chaplain, Jr., 
Oscar Dwelley, 
Charles W. Fletcher, 
Chauncey U. Fuller, 
John S. Hoar, 
F. D. K. Hoar, 
Walter 0. Holden, 
Eugene L. Hall, 



PRIVATES. 

Henry Hapgood, 
Marshall Hapgood, 
George Jones, 
Albert Moulton, 
Lewis J. Masters, 
George N. Pierce, 
John H. Pollard, 
George B. Parker, 
William Reed, 
Joseph N. Robbins, 
Wm. F. Wood, Lieutenant Co. 
K, 6th Regiment. 



20 



Nine Months' Men, enlisted in other Kegiments without a bounty 
from this town. 



J. R. Vangezel, Co. E, 6th Regt., 
R.Kinsley, Co. I, 48th Regt., 
* A. Newton, Co. E, 6th Regt., 



G. L. Shaw, Co. F, 47th Regt., 
G. Warren Knight, Co. E, 53d 
Regt. 



* Not credited to this town. 



HONORABLY DISCHARGED. 



J. F. Blood, Jr., Sept. 26, 1862, 
George Handley, 
Luke Smith, April 1, 1862, 
D. G. Taylor, Sept. 26, 1862, 
Daniel R. Briggs, Feb. 1, 1862, 
Edwin A. Jones, August, 1862, 



C. A. Hanscom, Nov. 25, 1862, 
John S. Hoar, Nov. 27, 1862, 
Geo. B. Parker, March, 1863, 
A. S. Fletcher, resigned, March, 

1863, 
William H. Loker. 



DIED WHILE IN THE SERVICE. 



Augustus W. Hosmer, in camp, November 30th, 1861. 
James R. Lentill, at New Orleans, November 16th, 1862. 
Warren R. Wheeler, at Fort St. Phillip, July 5th, 1862. 
Frank Handley, at Fort St. Phillip, July 7th, 1862. 
Albert E. Conant, on shipboard on voyage home, January 31st, 
1863. 
John Keenan, unknown. 

James M. Wright, in hospital at Philadelphia, September 1st, 1862. 
Elbridge Conant, at Suffolk, Va., February 10th, 1863. 
Marivan Miner, at New Orleans, 1863. 



RECAPITULATION. 



Three months' volunteers from Acton, 42 ; came home August 3d, 
1861. 

Three years' men, enlisting without town bounty, ... 75 

" with " ... 23 

Nine months' men who received the town bounty, _ . . 38 

" " enlisted without the town bounty . 5 

141 
Not credited to this town, _ 15 



Leaving the town's quota of 126 

Discharged, 11 : died, 9. 

WILLIAM D. TUTTLE, 
Acton, March 20, 1863. Town Clerk. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

SUPERINTENDENT OF THE SCHOOLS IN ACTON, 

FOR THE YEAR 1863-3. 



Gentlemen of the Committee : 

Pursuant to a vote of the town, passed at the last April 
meeting, authorizing the School Committee to choose a 
Superintendent of Schools, we were chosen to fill that of- 
fice, an office we had not sought, and which we accepted 
with extreme reluctance ; feeling, as we did, that it was 
not only one of much responsibility, but one, the duties of 
which are of such a peculiar nature, that it would be im- 
possible to give satisfaction to all ; especially those who 
take pains to find fault. 

If not acceptably to all, we have endeavored to perform 
the duties that have devolved upon us honestly, and with a 
view to the best good of the schools. From such observa- 
tions as we had been able to make, before we were so in- 
timately connected with the schools of this town, we judged 
that they would compare favorably with those of any of the 
towns around us. Our acquaintance with them the past 
year has fully confirmed this opinion. YTe also think we 
can truly say that their prosperity, the past year, has been 
fully equal to that of former years. 

We will now present a brief view of the several schools. 



22 

SOUTH SCHOOL. 
E. F. Fuller, Local Committee. 

The primary department of this school was taught for 
the year by Miss Lottie C. Faulkner. We might write 
much in praise of this teacher, and her methods of teach- 
ing ; yet, we feel that the highest encomium we can bestow, 
is to say that she has taught eighteen terms in her own dis- 
trict, with the increasing respect and confidence of the pa- 
rents and love of her scholars. The examinations, at the 
close of the fall and winter terms, were attended by a large 
number of parents and friends, whose countenances plain- 
ly expressed the interest and pleasure they felt in the ex- 
ercises, which were all very good indeed. We wish to 
speak of the singing in particular, because all of the school 
joined in this exercise — boys, as well as girls. 

The higher department was taught, during the spring 
and fall terms, by Miss Jennie M. Harris. Miss Harris is 
a teacher of much experience, and had Avon a high reputa- 
tion, which suffered none in this effort. She entered upon 
her duties with that zeal and determination, before which, 
the obstacles that are apt to arise in a school like this, must 
surely disappear. 

From our first visit, we felt satisfied that the committee 
had made a wise selection. The successful termination of 
the school, proved that we were not mistaken. The ex- 
amination was well attended, and passed off pleasantly. 
Among the classes we more particularly noticed, was the 
first class in reading, the classes in arithmetic, and the class 
in analysis. 

Some maps, drawn by members of the first and second 
classes in geography, were exhibited, which were neatly 
and correctly drawn. 

The winter term was placed in charge of Mr. Frederic 
C. Nash ; the same teacher who taught the winter previous. 



23 



Mr. Nash is an excellent disciplinarian, and brought the 
school to that degree of discipline, which we have rarely 
seen in any other. 

In all our visits, we were much pleased with the good 
order and studiousness of the scholars. The closing ex- 
amination was even better than we expected. The larger 
scholars performed their parts in a manner that reflected 
upon themselves and their teacher much credit ; and, among 
the smaller ones, there was scarce a blunder. 

The compositions were good ; some, in particular, were 
excellent. 

NORTH SCHOOL. 
James Keyes, Local Committee. 

The spring and fall terms of this school were placed in 
charge of Miss Sophia S. Harris. Possessed of a vigorous 
mind and healthy body, with a right good will to use them, 
any school, under her care, could not well help being a 
good one. It always gave us pleasure to visit this school ; 
there was such an air of cheerfulness pervading the school 
room, and the faces of the scholars always looked so pleas- 
ant and happy. The closing examination proved that the 
school had not only been a pleasant but very profitable one. 
The classes in mental arithmetic, and the second and third 
classes in reading, won for themselves much praise. We 
are sorry that Miss Harris has seen fit to leave the ranks 
of our teachers, where she has labored so long and success- 
fully ; yet, we are aware that the school which she has now 
entered, has claims to which all others are in a measure 
subordinate. May her prosperity, in her new sphere of 
life, be as great as that she enjoyed in the one she has left. 

The winter term of this school was taught by Mr. A. E. 
White, of Tuft's College. This was his first effort at school 
teaching, and, although some difficulty arose at the first of 
the term iu regard to the division of the advanced class in 



24 



reading, we consider it a very successful effort. Ambitious 
himself to excel, and willing to labor to the extent of his 
powers to advance the interests of his school, he instilled 
into the minds of his pupils the same principles, which 
caused them to study with unwonted zeal. The exercises 
at the close, which varied but little from those of every day 
of the term, exhibited that thoroughness in the branches 
taught, which we like to witness. Where all the classes 
appeared so well, we need not particularize. At the close 
of the other exercises, the teacher was presented with a 
beautiful. Bible, by one of the young ladies, in behalf of the 
school, in a feeling and appropriate speech. So deep were 
his feelings that, for some moments he could utter no word 
in response ; yet, that very silence conveyed a more last- 
ing impression than words could, that there existed be- 
tween the teacher and his pupils a bond of friendship that 
can never be severed. 

SOUTH-EAST SCHOOL. 
D. F. Tarbell, Local Committee. 

The spring and fall terms of this school were taught by 
Miss L. Arabella Walker, of Westford. She came before 
us highly recommended as a successful teacher, and we felt 
no hesitation in giving her our approbation. 

During the first term, the good order and improvement 
was such, as fully met our anticipations. The second term, 
though by no means a failure, was not what we had reason 
to expect. At the closing examination, some of the class- 
es, and some of the scholars in particular, appeared well. 
The school-room was beautifully decorated with a profusion 
of wreaths and mottoes. These we like to see ; yet, the 
adornment of the minds of the scholars should not be neg- 
lected, for the adornment of the school-room. 

The winter term was under the care of E. F. Richard- 
son. As this teacher is a particular friend of ours, we feel 



25 



that we shall be excused from saying but little in regard to 
his school, on the ground that we might be considered par- 
tial. Suffice to say, that the teacher considered it one of 
the pleasantest schools that he ever taught ; and that there 
was little or no fault found in the district, which has been 
proverbial for trouble with its schools. 

CENTRE SCHOOL. 
Jonas Blodgett, Local Committee. 

The primary department of this school, for the spring 
and winter terms, was under the care of Miss Clara TTeth- 
erbee, who has taught here several terms with uniformly 
good success. Kind and affectionate in her manners, she 
seems to lead children to do right, rather than force them. 
Her little company, notwithstanding it was somewhat bro- 
ken up by sickness, appeared very well at the close of the 
winter term. The various classes, as they passed in re- 
view before us, showed a degree of improvement com- 
mendable to themselves and their teacher. There are some 
very pretty singers in this school, and we enjoyed their 
singing much ; yet, we think it would be more interesting 
to hear all the little ones join in this healthful and cheer- 
ing exercise. 

The spring term of the higher department was taught by 
Miss Nellie Cowdrey. Miss Cowdrey gained, from the 
first, the respect and good will of her scholars, which made 
governing easy. The school always appeared cheerful and 
studious when we visited it. At the close, those classes 
that were brought before us in a manner that we could 
judge of their merits, did well. The declamations and 
dialogues were good, though perhaps there was more of 
them than it would be advisable to have at the examination 
of a school like this, where there are so many classes. 
We liked the appearance of this teacher in the school-room, 
and think she would win a high reputation in this vocation. 



26 



Owing to the comparatively small number of scholars in 
each department, the Local Committee thought proper to 
unite them both in one, during the fall term. This ar- 
rangement would save to the district the wages of one 
teacher, and give the scholars the benefit of a longer win- 
ter term. Miss Clara Wetherbee was placed in charge ; 
and, although it made a large school, and a large number 
of classes, she got along well, and brought the school to a 
successful close. At the examination the classes appeared 
well. The first class in reading, and second class in gram- 
mar, we noticed in particular. The compositions, which 
we consider a noticeable feature of any examination, where 
there are advanced scholars, were good. 

This school, during the winter term, enjoyed the advan- 
tage of having for a teacher Mr. Luther Conant, Jr., who 
had labored here successfully for two winters previous. 
Mr. Conant has long been known to the town as a thorough 
and efficient teacher ; and his history has been so often and 
fully written, that we feel we can add but little to it. Suf- 
fice to say, we consider him an excellent teacher for this 
school. The examination, which was attended by a large 
number of visitors, passed off well. The classes came be- 
fore us the same as they would on any other day of the 
term, the most of them answering promptly, and showing 
good improvement. We noticed, in particular, the classes 
in reading and spelling. If some of the scholars did not 
make that proficiency they ought, the fault was their own ; 
the teacher labored hard enough for them. 

WEST SCHOOL. 

George C. Wright, Local Committee. 

The spring and fall terms of the primary department 

were placed in care of Miss Susan C. Huggins. There are 

many good scholars in this school, and some " big rogues," 

who need to be governed with firmness and decision. We 



27 



think the teacher labored hard to promote the interests of 
the school, and in a measure was successful ; although her 
success would have been greater, if she had enforced bet- 
ter order. We will here say, however, that, if we have 
been rightly informed, she was led into this error by over- 
fearful parents, who, thinking she might be too severe, 
cautioned her in regard to it. At the close the classes 
generally showed a fair degree of improvement ; some of 
the smaller ones did very well indeed. 

The winter term was taught by Miss Clara H. Hapgood. 
Feeling more confidence in her own powers, and entering 
the school with a determination to bring it under good dis- 
cipline, she was successful in that respect. The examina- 
tion was very good, notwithstanding the school, during the 
last part of the term, was much interrupted by sickness. 
The classes spoke up promptly and distinctly, giving life 
and interest to the exercises. 

The spring and fall terms of the higher department were 
under the instruction of Miss Clara H. Hapgood, the same 
teacher who taught the winter primary. Miss Hapgood 
labored in this school with good success. Some of her 
methods of teaching we liked very well indeed ; especially, 
for those branches which are learned principally by memo- 
rizing. At the close of the school, which was well attend- 
ed, the exercises passed off with much credit to both schol- 
ars and teacher. Some very good maps were exhibited, 
which were drawn by the classes in geography. 

The winter term was taught by Mr. W. E. Eaton, of 
Tuft's College. We consider the committee was most for- 
tunate in securing the services of a teacher who could make 
good the place of the excellent one of last winter. Believ- 
ing that scholars like those under his care could govern 
themselves, he threw them upon their honesty and self- 
respect in such a manner that, Avith few exceptions, they 
needed no reproof. One thing we noticed in particular in 



28 



regard to his teaching ; that he instructed his scholars as to 
principles, so that they could tell " why they went through 
a certain process," rather than that they simply " had gone 
through it." This school possesses a large share of good 
ability, which this teacher knew well how to direct, to 
make the greatest possible advancement. Though much 
interrupted by sickness, not only of its members, but of 
its teacher, the school passed a very satisfactory examina- 
tion. Among the classes which we noted as particularly 
good, were the first class in reading, the class in analysis, 
and the classes in arithmetic. The " Independent," which 
was read by Missal Wheeler and Fuller, was a spicy little 
sheet, abounding in humor and good sense. The singing 
was excellent ; though, as we have before remarked, we 
had rather hear all the school sing that can, — and we be- 
lieve there are but few that cannot learn when they are 
young. If the harmony is not so good, the loss of it is 
more than made up by the pleasure we feel in seeing all 
enjo}^ an exercise so well calculated to promote health and 
happiness. 

EAST SCHOOL. 
James E. Billings, Local Committee. 
The spring term of this school was taught by Miss S. 
Augusta Davis. Miss Davis has taught this school several 
terms with increasing good success. Mild but firm, she 
manages to secure good order in her school, though there 
are some " rogueish boys." We consider this district in- 
deed fortunate in having so faithful and judicious a teach- 
er. The examination at the close showed that neither 
teacher nor scholars had been idle. The teacher of the 
spring term, wishing to enjoy a longer season of rest than 
the vacation afforded, the committee engaged the services 
of Miss Nellie J. Fletcher for the fall term. Miss Fletcher 
has been favorably known to the town as a teacher, for a 



29 



number of terms in her own district. From her good suc- 
cess there, we felt confident she would do well in this 
school. Nor were we mistaken. Her success was even 
better than we expected. At the close, all the classes 
showed a good degree of improvement. Some of the 
smaller ones very good. The compositions, written in that 
easy, natural style, which showed that the writers were 
familiar with their subjects, were such as we like to listen to. 

The winter term was taught by Miss S. A. Davis, the 
same teacher as of the spring term. This, we think, was 
her crowning effort. Though some of the bovs showed a 
disposition to take advantage, and play the " rogue" the 
first of the term, they were soon brought under good dis- 
cipline, and the school went on pleasantly to the close. 
The examination was excellent. All the more advanced 
classes recited so promptly and correctly, showing such 
marked improvement, that we hardly knew which to give 
the preference. Some very pretty declamations were 
spoken by the " little ones," and some very good compo- 
sitions were read by one of the young ladies. 

Thus far we have said nothing in regard to writing 
books, although they were exhibited at most of the exam- 
inations. Some of these showed a good hand-writing and 
good improvement, but the majority were lacking one or 
both of these. This is not as it should be, for we consider 
it an important part of an education to be able to write a 
neat, legible hanoj, notwithstanding the idea seems to be 
gaining ground that, to be considered as having a great 
mind and literary taste, a person must write in scrawls 
that would shame the ancient hieroglyphics. 

TVe have noticed that the writing of the best educated 
in the days of " our fathers,"- was almost invariably neat 
and legible, if not elegant. If Ave are not mistaken, this 
branch was one of the three laid down to be taught in the 
first schools established in the colonies. Is it not just as 



30 



important now as it was then ? Yet how many we find at 
the present day who can talk a little French, or read a lit- 
tle Latin or Greek, that cannot write their own names de- 
cently. Parents, see to it that your children have the 
requisite means to learn to write well ; and teachers should 
prepare themselves to teach this branch more thoroughly. 
Now a word to you, parents, about absenteeism, that 
great hinderance to the better advancement of our schools. 
Those who have preceded us in writing reports of the 
schools, have said much at different times upon this sub- 
ject, though no more than they ought. If you could only 
be in your school houses, during school hours for one week, 
and see how it breaks up classes and hinders the progress 
of scholars, many of you would think differently from what 
you now do ; and, not only think, but act differently. We 
mean, you would send your children punctually to school. 
If your childrens' bodies were suffering for food, would you 
not consider a whole loaf, at the same price, better than 
half? On the same reasoning, when the minds of your 
children — immortal minds — are suffering and dwarfing for 
the want of intellectual food and culture, is not a whole 
term, at the same price, better than a part? 



E. F. Richakdson, Superintendent. 



REPORTS OF THE LOCAL COMMITTEE?. 



SOUTH SCHOOL. 
Appropriation. 0336 93 

Balance from last year, 8 14 

Spring a>-d Fall Terms. 
Paid Miss Jennie M. Harris, for teaching 16 weeks, at 84.50 per week, 
Miss Lottie C. Faulkner. " " " 4J00 " 

Wihtke Term. 
3Ir. Fred C. Nash, for teaching 11 1-2 weeks, at S10.00 per week, 115 00 
Miss Lottie C Faulkner, " 12 " 4,50 

for wood, 

" building fires and cleaning house, 

" two brushes for blackboard, brooms, chalk, &c, 

Balance, 



S72 00 
64 00 

. 115 00 

' 54 00 

23 62 

3 75 

4 60 


$336 97 

8 10 



£345 07 



8345 07 



March 4, 1863. E. F. Fuller, Committee. 

NORTH SCHOOL. ^ 

Appropriation. S200 33 

Balance from last year, 2 97 



Paid Miss Sophia S. Harris, for teaching 16 weeks, at S4,50 per week, 872 00 

Mr. Alphonzo E. White, " 3 1-4 months, 113 75 

" two cords of wood, 11 25 

" building fires and care of house, 3 00 



8200 00 
Balance, 3 30 



S203 30 



8203 30 



James Keyes, Jr., Committee. 
SOUTH-EAST SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last year. 
Received of W. A. Wilde, 
Received of non-residents, 

Paid Miss L. A. Walker, for teaching 15 weeks and 4 days, 
Mr. E. F. Richardson, ll 3 1-2 months, 
for wood, 
" building fires and care of house, 
" cleaning house, two brooms, pail, and chair, 
" chalk and dipper, 



S200 33 


60 


38 14 


5 00 


870 78 


140 00 


12 00 


3 50 


3 32 


24 



8244 07 



8229 84 
Balance, 14 23 

8244 07 

March 20. 1863. D. F. Tarbell. Committee. 

EAST SCHOOL. 
Appropriation. 8200 33 

Balance from last year, 7 33 

S207 71 

Paid Miss S. A. Davis, for teaching 11 weeks, at 84.50 per week, 849 50 

Miss E. J. Fletcher, " " " " " " 49 50 

Miss S. A. Davis. " 15 '• " 6.50 " 97 50 

for cleaning house, building fires, and two brooms, 5 03 

" repairs on house, one dipper, 1 42 

8202 95 
Balance, 4 76 

S207 71 

March 21, 1863. James E. Billixgs, Committee. 



32 



CENTRE SCHOOL. 

Appropriation, * $336 93 

Received of Dr. Cowdrey, 6 00 

Spring Term. 
Paid Miss Helen Cowdrey, teaching 8 weeks, at $4,50 per week, $36 00 

Miss Clara Wetherbee, " " " " 3.75 " 30 00 

Fall Term. 
Miss Clara Wetherbee, for teaching 8 weeks, at $4,50 per week, 36 00 

"Winter Term. 
Mr. Luther Conant, Jr., for teaching 14weeks, at $10,00 per week, 140 00 
Miss Clara Wetherbee, " " " " 3,75 " 52 50 

for wood, 

" care of house and building fires, 
" setting glass, pails, brooms and chalk, 

Balance, 



$342 93 



21 00 
4 50 

2 00 

$322 00 
20 93 



$342 93 
J. Blodgett, Committee. 



WEST SCHOOL. 

Appropriation, $336 93 

Received of A. Fuller, 7 50 

Paid Miss Susan C. Huggins, teaching 16 weeks, at $4.00 per week, $64 00 

Miss Clara H. Hapgood, " " " " 4,50 " 72 00 

" " " 13 " :t 4,50 " 58 50 

Mr. W. E. Eaton, " 13 " " 10,00 " 130 00 

for wood, 20 83 

u taking care of house, 4 75 



$344 43 



$350 08 



Deficiency, $5 

March 20, 1863. G. C. Wright, Committee. 



33 



STATISTICAL TABLE FOR 18G2-3. 



Districts. 


Names op Teachers 


o 

c 

« i 

Tc.5 

B 
u 

i-5 


a 

o 
B 

V 

o> 

bn 

M 


Amount of 

Wages 


o 
■a £ 


i- 

SB 

a o 
Ho 

< 


■ a? 

> C5 

0=M 

t- o 

M 2 

B M 


in 

h 

G 

a 

6 
ft 


03 S 

5.2 
ft 


u 

c 

Si X! 

c« ^ 
o 

ft 




spring. 




















South, . 


Jennie M. Harris, . . 


2 


$18,00 


$36,00 


53 


47 


2 








16 


« 


Lottie C. Faulkner, . 


2 


16,00 


32,00 


61 


52 





1 





13 


West. . . 


Clara H. Hapgood, . 


2 


18,00 


36,00 


42 


37 


2 


P 





9 


u 


Susan C Huggius, . 


2 


16,00, 


32,00 


49 


44 





7 





U 


Centre, . 


Helen E. Cowdrev, . 


2 


18,00 


36,00 


28 


25 








75 


r. 


(< 


Clara Wetherbee, . . 


2 


15,00 


30,00 


35 


32 











4 


East, . . 


S. Augusta Davis, 


23-4 


18,00 


49,00. 


41 


35 


2 


5 


40 


7 


South East, 


L. Aiabclla Walker, . 


2 


18.00 


36,00 


34 


31 


1 








10 


North, . 


Sophia S. Harris, . . 


2 


18,00 


36,00 


27 


25 


2 


4 





12 




188-4 $155,00 


$323,00 


370 


8:;s 


9 


17 








PALL. 




















South, 


Jennie M. Harris. . . 


2 


$18,00 


$33,00 


47 


40 


5 





75 


7 


« 


Lottie C. Faulkner, . 


2 


16,00 


32,00 


58 


53 





1 


75 


20 


West, . . 


Clara H Hapgood, . 


2 


18,00 


36,00 


50 


38 


2 





GO 


7 


« 


Susan C. Huggius, . 


2 


16,00 


32,00 


52 


44 








35 


7 


Centre, . 


Clara Wetherbee, . . 


o 


18,00 


36.00 


52 


40 


1 





50 


13 


East, . . 


Ellen J. Fletcher, . . 


2841 18,00 


49,50 


42 


36 


2 


G 


40 


4 


South East, 


L. Arabella Walker, . 


2 ! 18,00 


33,00 


32 


23 


1 





30 


9 


North, . 


Sophia 8. Harris, . . 


2 
163-4 


18,00 


33,00 


24 


22 





1 


35 


8 




$140,00 


$293,50 


357 


296 


11 


8 








WINTER. 












1 






South, . 


Fred. C. Nash, . . . 


2 7-8 


040,00 


$115,00 


59 


54 


18 





80 


11 


•' 


Lottie C. Faulkner, . 


3 


18,00 


54,00 


Gl 


54 





1 


56 


17 


West, . . 


W. E. Eaton, . . . 


31-4 


40,00 


130,00 


52 


46 


13 





100 


9 


" 


Clara H. Hapgood, . 


31-4 


18,00 


58,50 


58 


46 





1 


40 


1 


Centre, . 


Luther Conant, Jr., . 


31-2 


40,00 


140,00 


53 


48 


17 





90 


20 


(< 


Clara Wetherbee, . . 


31-2 


15,00 


52,50 


35 


32 








36 


13 


East, . . 


S. Augusta Davis, 


33-4 


26.00 


97,50 


46 


33 


10 


2 


4G 


1 


South East, 


E. F. Richardson, . . 


31-2 


40,00 


140,00 


31 


27 





9 


30 


1 


North, 


A.E.White, . . . 


31-4 


35.00 


113.75 


38 


35 


15 





30 


3 




297-6*272,00 


$901,25 


433 !S80 


73 13 


1 



ANNUAL 

REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN, 

OF THE 

TOWN OF ACTON, 

FROM FEB. 26, 1863, TO FEB. 26, 1864. 

AND THE 

REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

ALSO, THE 

REPORT OF TOWN CLERK, 

AND THE 

REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 

FOR THE YEAR 1863-64. 



CONCORD : 

PRINTED BY BENJAMIN TOLMAN. 
1864. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



RECEIPTS. 



Amount received. 



$20,146 90 



EXPENDITURES. 



SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 



Paid. 

Jonas Blodget, for Centre School, 
George C. Wright, for West School, 
Emerson F. Fuller, for South School, 
Daniel F. Tarbell, for South East School, 
Isaac T. Flagg, for North School, 
Joseph Esterbrook, for East School, 



$335 43 


335 43 


335 43 


199 44 


199 44 


199 44 



$1,604 61 



REPAIRS ON SCHOOL HOUSES. 



Paid. 



?or repairs on the Centre School House, 


$18 87 


" " " West School House, 


20 46 


" " " South School House, 


29 56 


" " " South East School House, 


11 50 


11 " " North School House, 


1 48 


14 East School House, 


1 40 



$83 27 





BOOKS AND PRINTING 




Paid. 






For Printing Warrants, 


$4 50 


(< < 


' Dog Notices, 


1 00 


CI ( 


1 Selectmen's Report, 


10 00 


<( ( 


1 450 Pamphlet Reports, 


06 25 


«( ( 


1 Town Record Book, 


4 50 


< < « 


1 Tax Books, 


1 33 







$87 58 



ABATEMENT AND DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 



Paid. 

John E. Cutter, Abatement on Taxes, $14 83 

John E. Cutter, Discount on Taxes, 450 25 



$465 08 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 
Paid. 
Hiram B. Livermore, for breaking roads 84 

hours, 
Nehemiah Curtis, for breaking roads 13 hours, 
Joseph Noyes, for " " 27 " 

Daniel Harris, for " " 8 " 

Francis Kingsley, for repairs on highway, 
Cyrus Fletcher, for railing highway and repairing 

bridges, 
Simon Robbins, for repairs on highway, 
Silas Conant, for teaming stones for railing, 
Julius M. Smith & Co., for joist for railing, 



$10 50 


1 


62 


3 


37 


1 


00 


7 


69 


11 


97 


7 


91 


5 


50 


8 


81 



$58 37 



APPROPRIATION FOR SOLDIERS AND FAMILIES. 

Paid. 

For State Aid, $2,314 64 

Recruiting Expenses for 17 men, 1,718 00 

$4,032 64 



APPROPRIATION FOR TOWN BUILDINGS. 

Paid. 

Town Hall building committee, $6,163 79 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 

Paid. 

Levi Dow, for keeping stranger, 

For wood for Widow Lewis Ohaffin, 

" groceries for Widow Lewis Chaffin, 
City of Boston, for support of Sarah Childs, 
Town of Concord for burial expenses of Elmira 
Oliver, 



$ 62 

26 67 

10 26 

8 75 


5 00 



TOWN OFFICERS. 

,Paid. 

Edward F. Richardson, for examining teachers, su- 
perintending schools, and writing reports, $40 00 

James E. Billings, for services as Overseer of 

the Poor, 5 00 

Do. do., for two journeys to Cambridge, re- 
specting Elmira Johnson, 4 00 

Do. do., journey to Boston respecting Sarah 

Childs and Adeline Bobbins, 2 00 

Do. do., journey to Marlboro', respecting Emer- 
son B. Handley, 

Jonas K. Putney, for services as Overseer of Poor, 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, 

William D. Tuttle, 2 1-2 days taking inventory, 

Do., making and copying taxes, 

Wm. D. Tuttle, for services as Town Clerk, 

Do., for collecting and recording 46 births, 

Do., " recording 52 deaths, 

Do., " " 9 marriages, 

Do., making report and military record, 

Samuel Hosmcr, for taking inventory and making 
taxes. 

Eben Davis, for do., do., 

John E. Cutter, for collecting taxes for 1862, 

Jonas K. Putney, for services as Selectman, 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, do., do., 

James E. Billings, do., do., 



2 00 


t, 5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


15 00 


15 00 


9 20 


7 20 


90 


5 00 


' 15 00 


15 00 


70 00 


8 50 


30 00 


36 00 



NOTES AND INTEREST. 

Paid. 

Joseph R. Vangesel, Note and interest, $62 76 

George W. Parks, " " " 89 04 

Francis E. Harris, " " " 53 75 



$51 30 



$294 80 



Augustine Conant, Interest, 


120 00 


Frederick Rouillard, " 


30 00 


Daniel L. Veazey, " 


6 00 


Daniel Harris, " 


18 00 


Ebenezcr Conant, " 


180 00 


Joel Hanscom, " 


40 80 


David M. Hand ley, 


12 00 







$1 


50 


1 


00 


98 


79 


4 


50 


6 


00 


6 


00 


91 


65 


54 00 


7 


75 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 

Paid. 

Levi Dow, for notifying dog owners to get their 

dogs licensed, 
Levi Dow, for killing two dogs, 
Daniel H. Wethcrboe, for services on town farm, 
For coffin for Michael Quinn, 
Concord Fire Engine Co., 
Francis Kingsley, for stone posts for burying 

ground, 
Do., for building wall at the burying ground, 
Thomas Kingsley, 
For town pump, 
Wm. D. Tuttle, for stone posts for bounds and set- 
ting same on the common, 1 00 
For surveying and making plan and deed of land 

sold John Fletcher, 2 25 

Alonzo Tower, for damage caused by defective 

highway, 75 00 

For insurance on Town Hall while building, 53 50 

" for five years, 150 00 

Albeit T. Edmonds, for opening vestry for Town 

meetings, 
Do., for tolling bell for twenty deaths, 
Daniel Jones, for goods delivered Mrs. Harriet 

Robbins, 
James A. Balch, for tolling bell for four deaths, 
George Prouty, " " " five " 

Hiram J. Hapgood, " " twelve " 

George E. Johnson, for burial straps, 
For furnace, settees, lamps, &c, for Town Hall, 
Luke Smith, for collecting and taking care of 

bell metal, 
Wm. D. Tuttle, for eight days' labor at burying 

ground, 
Francis Dwight, for coffin and robe for J. D. Ogle, 



2 00 


4 00 


19 88 


80 


1 00 


2 40 


.2 50 


489 88 


2 00 


10 00 


, 6 95 



$612 35 



Do., for burial of 42 persons, 82 86 
Do., for making return of 40 persons to Town 

Clerk, 4 00 

Henry M. Smith, for burial of nine persons, 18 00 
Fitch burg R. R. Co., for transportation of soldiers 

in 1862, 15 15 

George C. Wright, for settees for West School, 12 35 

Express, 4 66 

Stationery, 1 75 



$1,233 12 



CONDITION OF THE TREASURY, FEB. 26, 1864. 



RECEIPTS. 




Balance in the Treasury, Feb. 26, 1862, 


$292 80 


State Tax, 1863, 


2,424 00 


County Tax, 1863, 


747 03 


Town Grant, 1863, 


4,000 00 


Town Grant for Schools, 


1,500 00 


Overlay on Taxes, 


265 48 


Highway Deficiencies, 


21 20 


Dog Tax, 


45 00 


State Aid to Jan. 1st, 1863, 


2,416 01 


State bounty for soldiers, 


2,647 17 


Town of Sudbury, for tuition, 


10 00 


Borrowed money, 


5,395 27 


Money from State for May training, 1862, 


87 50 


For old bell, 


119 59 


From State, for burial of J. D. Ogle and M. 




Quinn, 


10 00 


Armory rent, 


50 00 


Town of Concord, for tuition, 


20 60 


For old iron and ashes, > 


21 25 


State school fund, 


74 00 




<$Of| 1,jfi HA 




<fl>ZiU, I'iU \)\J 


EXPENDITURES. 




For support of schools, 


$1,604 61 


repairs on school houses, 


83 27 


books and printing, 


87 58 



abatement and discount on taxes, 465 08 



'0~ 



8 



For roads and bridges, 

appropriation for soldiers and families, 

" " Town buildings, 

support of poor, 
Town Officers, 
- notes and interest, 
miscellaneous expenses, 
State tax, 
County tax, 



Balance in Treasury Feb. 26, 1864, 



58 37 






4.032 


64 






6,163 


79 






51 


30 






294 


80 






612 


35 






1,233 


12 






2,424 


00 






747 


03 








t 


$17,857 


94 




<■ 




$2,288 96 



FINANCIAL CONDITION OF THE TOWN FEB. 26, 1864. 

Dr. 

To balance as per report, Feb, 26, 1864, $2,288 96 
amount due from the State for aid furnished 
families of soldiers, 2,870 92 

$5,159 88 



AMOUNT DUE ON NOTES. 
Cr. 



By Cash of Daniel Harris, 




$805 34 


Eben Conant, 




4,500 00 


Frederick Rouillard, 




1,700 00 


Silas P. Blodgct, 




795 27 


David M. Handley, 




200 00 


Daniel L. Veazey, 




100 00 


Mathew McKiuney, 




100 00 


Charles H. Blood, 




100 00 


Joel Hanscom, 




680 00 


Augustine Conant, 




4,000 00 


Isaac T. Flagg, 




100 00 


James Keycs, Jr., 




600 00 


John Wood, 




500 00 


Elbridge J. Bobbins, 




500 00 


Interest on Notes, 




570 24 




1864, 


$15,250 85 


Balance against the Town Feb. 26, 


without 


including the balance due as per 


Overseers' 


report for 1864, 




$10,090 97 



AMOUNT OF STATE AID PAID EACH PERSON. 



Paid. 

Mrs. Charlotte M. Pike, 


$144 00 


Maria Fisk, 


144 00 


Sally Veazey, 


144 00 


Betsey M Sawyer, 


144 00 


Betsey Shehan, 


144 00 


Hattie S. Jackson, 


144 00 


S. H. Wetherbee, 


144 00 


Rosa Miner, 


144 00 


Margaret Fitzpatrick, 


144 00 


t Rebecca C. Wright, 


116 00 


Joanna Moulton, 


104 00 


Catherine Dwelley, 


60 00 


Henrietta Gross, 


52 00 


Nancy Huggins, 


52 00 


Charlotte Blood, 


52 00 


Anna E. Robbins, 


52 00 


Sarah J. Taft, 


52 00 


Sarah J. Skinner, 


52 00 


Martha Wayne, 


52 00 


Berintha W. Sawyer, 


27 43 


Eliza W. Reed, 


14 00 


Sarah Callahan, 


35 60 


Huldah Moulton, 


36 00 


Mary A. Butters, 


36 00 


Helen M. Clark, 


36 00 


L. W. Bowers, 


35 00 


F. L. Whitcomb, 


26 28 


Sarah A. Hutchins, 


13 14 


H. C. Holden, 


13 14 


Maria Morrill, 


13 14 


Eliza Kingsley, 


73 20 


Fannie Parker, 


2 57 


S. F. Chaplin, 


13 14 


JAMES E. BILLINGS, ' 


) 


JONAS K. PUTNEY, 


y Selectme? 


J. K. W. WETHERBEE, J 


i 


Acton, Feb. 26, 1864. 




2 





$2,314 64 



REPORT OF TOWN HOUSE BUILDING COMMITTEE, 



RECEIPTS. 
Received of the Town Treasurer, 



$8,153 67 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for material and building town house, $7,663 79 
" " furnace, settees and other fixtures, 489 88 



1,153 67 



Or. 

By lumber, oil, nails, &c, on hand, 
" furnace, settees, &c, 



$75 00 
489 88 



Total expense of the house, 



$564 88 

$7,588 79 



Daniel Wetherbee, 
Samuel Hosmer, 
James Tuttle, 
Cyrus Fletcher, 
David M. Handley, 
A. M. Rowell, 
Luther Conant, 



Building 
Committee. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES, 

AT THE 

ALMSHOUSE, IN ACTON, 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING APRIL V 1864. 



ARTICLES ON HAND, APRIL 1, 1864. 

1 pair oxen, $175,00, 1 horse, 70,00, 9 cows, 300,00, $545 00 

3 shotes, 48,00, 30 bush, corn, 42,00, 12 bush, oats, 9,00, 99 00 

5 bush, beans, 12,50, 3-4 bush, peas, .93, 22 fowls, 8,25, 21 68 
55 bush, potatoes, 33,00, 1-2 bbl. soap, 2,50, 350 lbs. 

pork, 43,75, 79 25 

75 lbs. beef, 6,00, 4 bbls. apples, 4,00, 36 lbs. candles, 5,40, 15 40 

soap grease, 1,25, 1 bbl. pickles, 3,00, 10 lbs. tallow, .90, 5 15 

vinegar, 3,00, 53 M. skewers, 26,50, 100 lbs. ham, 14,00, 43 50 
59 lbs. lard, 8,26, 3 1-2 tons hay, 70,00, 37 lbs. dried 

apples, 3,33, 81 59 

10 bush, ashes, 1 25 



$891 82 



RECEIPTS. 

For milk, $344,62, apples, 178,71, calves, 46,96, 
skewers, 40,13, cows, 146,50, pork, 20,61, 
beef, 18,79, hay, 39,86, labor, 70,00, poultry, 
eggs, 14,70, turnips, 6,85, onions, 5,41, hide, 
lard, 3,82, pasturing, 1,75, peas, .15. 





$570 29 




207 24 


9,70, 


138 35 


5,20, 


32 16 




5 72 



$953 76 



12 



EXPENDITURES. 

Cloth and clothing, $29,12, boots and shoes, 16,13, 845 25 

Skewer timber, 4,50, castings, 4,61, earthen ware, 2,50, 11 61 

Sugar. 14,13, molasses. 24,82, tea, 5,33, coffee, 7,44, 51 72 

Meat, 56,61, butter, 48,44, cheese, 16.43, fish, 7,77, 129 25 

Flour, 47,00, rye meal, 10,37, corn, 2,37, Indian meal, 14,87, 74 61 

Salt, 4,90, onions, 5,20, bread, 1,86, tobacco, 6,55, 18 51 

Yeast, .40, saltpetre, .28, spices, 3,99, starch, .24, 4 91 

Salaratus, .40. camphor, .10, lemons, .13, 63 

Raisins, .52, oil, 2,15, soap, 1,07, rosin, 1,00, ■ 4 74 

Wickiug, .39, grass and garden seeds, 5,14, milk, 2,53, 8 06 

Cider, 1,70, nails, .73, lampblack, .4, powder, .60, 3 07 

Spirits, .75, cords, .71, tools, 13,59, blacksmith's bill, 17,25, 32 26 

Crockery, .98, plaster, 3,50, potash, 2,15, bone meal, .40, 7 03 

Sawing bill, 1,11, whips, .38, ladders, 4,28, 5 77 

Bill, 3,75, barrels, 10,31, lumber, 1,05, glass and putty, .52, 15 63 

Stove polish, .6, paper, .10, repairing pump, 5,00, 5 16 

Use of bull, 1,00, labor, 1,75, newspaper, 2,20, 4 95 

Cash to paupers, .75. wooden ware, .49, 1 24 

Expenses to Boston, 15,49, Dr. Cowdry's bill, 7,58, 23 07 

Use of pasture, 20,00, coffin, 7,20, cows, 59,25, *' 86 45 

Heifers, 83,30, shotes, 23,77, brooms, 1,25, 108 32 

Salve, .23, matches, .50, use of wagon, 6,50, 7 23 

Use of winnowing mill, 50 

Services of Mr. and Mrs. D. H. Wetherbee, 275 00 

James E. Billings' services, 6 00 

Jonas K. Putney's " 6 00 

J. K. W. Wetherbee's services, 6 00 



Amount of inventory, April 1, 1863, 
Interest on farm, 





$942 97 


$822 05 




239 40 






$1,061 45 





$2,004 42 



RECAPITULATION. 



Amount of receipts, 




$953 76 


xVmount of expenditures, 




942 97 


Cash on hand, ' 


$10 79 


Total amount of expenditures, 


$942 97 




Amount of inventory, April 1, 1863, 


822 05 




Interest on farm, 


239 40 


$2,004 42 



13 



Total amount of receipts, $953 76 

Amount of inventory, April 1, 1864, 891 82 



SI. 845 58 



$158 84 
Expense of victualing foreigners, 10 00 



Total expense of supporting poor in Almshouse, $148 84 

Whole number of persons (exclusive of foreigners) supported in 
the Almshouse, 6 ; average, 5 1-4 ; present number, 5. 

James E. Billings, ) Overseers 
Jonas K. Putney, > of 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, ) Poor. 

Acton, April 1, 1864. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



BIRTHS RECORDED IN ACTON, IN 1863. 

No. Date of Birth. Names. Names of Parents. 

1. Jan. 11, In Worcester, Hattie Emily Smith, daughter of Henry 

M. and Abbie B. Smith. 

2. Jan. 12, Frank F. Webber, son of Gilbert T. and Sarah A. 

Webber. 

3. Jan. 15, William Wilson Schouler, sob of William and Elizabeth 

G. Schouler. 

4. Jan. 28, Fred Everett Cutler, son of N. E. and Sarah A. 

Cutler. 

5. Feb. 1, Frederic Stearns Mead, son of Varnum B. and D. Eliz- 

abeth Mead. 

6. Feb. 4, Addie Henrietta Barker, daughter of Henry and Louisa 

M. Barker. 

7. Feb. 8, John Frederic Kinsley, son of Thomas and Maria 

Kinsley. 

8. Feb. 13, Rosalia Etta Fredericks, daughter of William A. and 

Margaret Fredericks. 

9. Feb. 17, In Littleton, Mary Kate and Margaret Ellen Gubbins, 

10. " " twin children of James and Margaret Gubbins. 

11. Feb. 18? In New Ipswich, N. H., Evergene Adelia and Eugene 

12. " " Appleton Avery, twin children of James E. and Har- 

riet B. Avery. 

13. March 3, Carrie Evelyn Jones, daughter of Elnathan Jr. and 

Elizabeth Jones. 

14. March 6, Walter A. Richardson, son of Charles F. and Mary 

Richardson. 

15. March 11, Mabel Loraine Livermore, daughter of fliram B. and 

Laura E. Livermore. 

16. March 25, Florence Perkins, daughter of Isaiah B. and Mary 

E. Perkins. 

17. April 21, Albert McDonald, son of George and Mary McDonald. 

18. April 21, Kate Conway, daughter of John and Julia Conway. 

19. May 2, A daughter of Henry H. and Ellen A. Hale. 



15 



20. May 24. Freddy Hand, son of George W. and M. Augusta 

Rand. 

21. May 26, John Franklin Hosmer, son of Cyrus and M. Matilda . 

Hosmer. 

22. May 30, Gilman Henry Parlin, son of Asaph, Jr., and Candace 

M. Parlin. 

23. June 5, Herbert Melvin Taylor, son of Thomas and Martha A. 

Taylor. 

24. June 11, Frederic Brooks Noyes, son of Thomas F. and Sarah 
t C. Noyes. 

25. June 13, Robert Howard Todd, son of James and Margaret C. 

Todd. 

26. July 4. Emma Teel, daughter of William H. and Mary E. Teel. 

27. July 15. James Paul Hayward, son of Joel F. and Sarah E. 

Hay ward. 

28. July 16, Myrtilla Richardson, daughter of Edward F. and Fran- 

ces H. Richardson. 

29. Aug. 2, Herbert Augustine Conant, son of Luther, Jr., and 

Celeste J. Conant. # 

30. Aug. 3, William Murphy, son of Daniel and Elizabeth J. Mur- 

phy. 

31. Aug. 6, Elmer Ellsworth Handley, son of Reuben and Caroline 

M. Handley. 

32. Aug. 12, Mary Chase, daughter of Thomas N. and M. Maria 

Chase. 

33. Aug. 22, Thomas Haggerty, son of William, 2d, and Catherine 

Haggerty. 

34. Sept, 12, Nixon Ball, son of Lewis F. and Martha D. Ball. 

35. Sept. 14, In Stow, George Alvah Edson, son of James T. and 

Susan T. Edson. 

36. Sept, 23, Nellie Haggerty, daughter of William and Mary Hag- 

gerty. 

37. Oct. 2,-Estelle D. Heath, daughter of Edwin H. and Isabella 

M. Heath. 

38. Oct. 26, James Hannon, son of Michael and Mary Hannon. 

39. Nov. 10, A son to James L. and Frances E. Parker. 

40. Nov. 13, Frank Cleveland Wright, son of George C. and Susan 

H. Wright. 

41. Nov. 20, Elizabeth Griffin, daughter of Morris and Catherine 

Griffin. 

42. Nov. 23, Etta Cora Temple, daughter of John and Lottie A. 

Temple. 

43. Dec. 18, Viola Sophia Tuttle, daughter of Luke and S. Sophia 

Tuttle. 

44. Dec. 26, A son to Henry A. and Mary O. Dwelley. 
Born in Acton, 38 ; males, 23 ; females, 15. 



16 



MARRIAGES IN ACTON, IN 1863. 

No. Date of Marriage. Names of Parties. 

1. Jan. 1, Loren James Bradford, of Japan, and Miss Hattie A. 

Burroughs, of Acton. 

2. April 1, Henry Hartwell, of Acton, and Miss Augusta H. Pen- 

niman, of Concord. 

3. April 3, James Wheeler and Miss S. Jennie Rowell, both of 

Acton. 

4. May 6, John White and Miss Sarah A. Rouillard, both of Acton. 

5. Aug. 2, Charles A. Brown, of Fitchburg, and Miss Anna B. 

Atwood, of Acton. 

6. Sept. 12, Edward C. Cutcliff and Mrs. Louisa A. Marble, both 

of Acton. 

7. Oct. 10, George M. Kendall and Miss Henrietta Conant, both of 

Acton. 

8. Oct. 18, George F. Keyes and Miss Arabella W. Priest, both of 

Acton. 

9. Nov. 25, George Conant, of Acton, and Miss Leora E. Willis, 

of- Stow. 



DEATHS IN ACTON, IN 1863. 

No. Date of Death. Name and Age of Deceased. 

1. Jan. 15, Mrs. Hattie R. Conant, aged 26 yrs. 8 mos. 25 days. 

2. Jan. 22, Widow Nabby F. Hayden, aged 73 years. 

3. Feb. 5, Mr. John Harris, aged 88 yrs. 10 mos. 

4. Feb. 14, Nathaniel B. son of Charles F. and Melisa Jordan, 

aged 2 yrs. 7 mos. 

5. Feb. 15. Mr. Joseph Brabrook, aged 83 yrs. 6 mos. 16 days. 

6. " " Carrie M., daughter of William A. and Lydia J. Wilde, 

aged 6 yrs. 4 mos. 3 days. 

7. March 25, Mrs. Lucy B. Noyes, wife of Capt. Joseph Noyes, 

aged 53 yrs. 

8. March 28, Patrick Phelan, son of Michael and Ellen Phelan, 

aged 16 yrs. 4 mos. 21 days. 

9. April 1, Mr. Reuben Wheeler, aged 81 yrs. 

10. " 18, Mr. Lovell Spaulding, aged 69 yrs. 1 mo. 23 days. 

11. " 21, Franklin Loker, son of Henry and Mary M. Loker, 

aged 19 yrs. 10 mos. 9 days. 

12. April 26, Mrs. Mary M. Bowers, wife of Luke W. Bowers, aged 

30 yrs. 10 mos. 6 days. 

13. April 27, Carrie Evelyn, daughter of Edwin and Mary J. Fletch- 

er, aged 2 yrs. 3 mos. 15 days. 



17 



14. April 28, Mr. Henry Puffer, aged 37 years. 

15. May 2, Lavina W., daughter of Luke W. and Mary M. Bowers, 

aged 2 yrs. G mos. 

16. June 2, Mr. Joel Conant, aged 75 yrs. 

17. " 3, Capt. Robert P. Boss, aged 59 yrs 

18. " 9, Mr. Abel Robbins, aged 71 yrs. 9 mos. 

19. July 2, Franklin B., son of Isaiah B. and Mary E. Perkins, aged 

9 yrs. 7 mos. 

20. July 4, Olvin H., son of Joseph and Naney Estabrook, aged 5 

yrs. 11 mos. 4 days. 

21. July 8, Silas F., son of Silas Jr., and Almira Conant, aged 6 

yr.<. 9 mos. 13 days. 

22. July 11, Jeremiah, son of James and Catherine Hurley, aged 

10 yrs. 1 roo. 25 days. 

23. July 15, Nellie Celeste, daughter of Joseph and Nancy Esta- 

brook, aged 3 yrs. 10 mos. 17 day.-. 

24. July 20, Edna C. Taylor, daughter of Zoheth and Marthaetta 

Taylor, aged 8 yrs. 8 mos. 27 days. 

25. July 24, Nellie C, daughter of Moses and Nancy 31. Hay ward, . 

aged 6 yrs. 11 mos. 18 days. 

26. July 27, Bertha Sophie, daughter of Varnum and Sarah L. Tut- 

tle. aged 8 mos. 20 days. 

27. Aug. 1, Miss Lucy Jennings, aged 75 yrs. 10 mos. 15 days. 

28. Aug. 25, Mrs. Hannah Hapgood, widow of Ephraim Hapgood, 

aged 77 yrs. 

29. Aug. 30, Mr. William Hosmer, aged 59 yrs. 1 mo. 15 days. 

30. Sept. 4, Mr. John Tenny, aged 35 yrs 6 mos. 10 days. 

31. " 11, Mrs. Mary J. Fletcher, wife of Edwin Fletcher, aged 

30 yrs. 5 mos. 

32. Sept. 15, Flora Abbie, daughter of Henry M. and Abbie B. 

Smith, aged 4 yrs. 5 mos. 6 days. 

33. Sept. 29, Mrs. Mary Knight, wife of Simeon Knight, aged 82 

yrs. 

34. Oct. 1, Miss Mary A. Pierce, aged 17 yrs. 3 days. 

35. " 15, Alfred Adams, son of Nathan S. and Louisa W. Adams, 

aged 18 yrs. 

36. Oct. 25, Miss Martha J. Hyde, aged 19 yrs. 3 mos. 14 days. 

37. " 28, William W., son of William and Elizabeth G. Schouler, 

aged 9 mos. 13 days. 

38. Oct. 29 Ida Everlena, daughter of Winthrop E. and Lydia A. 

Wood, aged 1 yr. I mo. 17 days. 

39. Nov. 3, Mrs. Mary Matilda Hosmer, wife of Cyrus Hosmer, 

aged 26 yrs. 9 mos. 11 days. 

40. Nov. 25, Mr. Henry Hapgood, son of John and Mary A. Hap- 

good, aged 21 yrs. 9 mos. 20 days. 

41. Dec. 5, Mrs. Sarah Hosmer, widow of Mr. Samuel Hosmer, aged 

94 yrs. 7 mos. 13 days. 
3 



18 
SOLDIERS IN THE UNITED STATES SERVICE. 

No. 

1. Jan. 31, Albert E. Conant, Co. F, 30th Reg., died on voyage 

home from New Orleans. 

2. Feb. 9, Elbridge Conant, son of Silas and Eliza Conant, aged 21 

yrs. 7 mos. 19 days, died at Suffolk, Va., of brain fever. 

3. Feb. 15, Marivan Miner, Co. E, 26th Reg., aged about 50 yrs., 

died at New Orleans of consumption. 

4. April 4, Wm. H. Loker, Co, E, 26th Reg., son of Henry and 

Mary M. Loker, died in action, aged 21 yrs. 10 mos. 

5. April 10, George W. Knight, Co. E, 53d Reg., son of Simeon 

and Lucinda P. Knight, aged 20 yrs., died at or near 
New Orleans. 

6. July 10, John H. P. White, Assistant Quartermaster of 26th 

Reg., aged 46 yrs., died at New Orleans. 

7. Aug. 9, Henry W. Laselle, Co. E, 26th Reg., son of Charles and 

Harriet Laselle, died at New Orleans, aged 19 yrs. 5 
mos. 

8. Oct. 13, Eri Huggins, Co. A, 26th Reg., died at New Orleans, 

aged 55 yrs. 9 mos. 5 days. 

9. Nov. 29, Lieut. Geo. L. Sbaw, Co. F, 47th Reg., died in Bos- 

ton, aged 26 yrs., of disease contracted while in the 
service. 

10. Jan. 14, Wm. B. Reed, Co. E, 26th Reg., son of William and 

Lucy D. Reed, aged 21 yrs., died at Franklin, La. 

11. Aug. — , Mathew McKinney, Co. E, 26th Reg., died at or near 

New Orleans. 

12. Dec. 1, Lieut. John A. Howard, 3d Corps d'Afrique, died at St. 

James Hospital, New Orleans, of fever. 



MILITARY RECORD. 



The past year has been an eventful one in the history of the nation, 
as of the town. In the great struggle for national existence, though 
success has not always attended our arms, yet upon a careful survey of 
the whole field of operations, it will be seen that important advantages 
have been gained, and that while the limits of the rebellion have been 
greatly narrowed down, its military strength and resources have been 
seriously impaired. 

While the burdens of the war press heavily upon the resources of 
the nation, taxing to the utmost the financial skill of the government 
to maintain its credit, yet the people have not abated one jot of heart 
or hope, and if we mistake not. cost what it may, are to-day more than 
ever determined that the struggle shall not cease till the rebellion is 
crushed and every obstacle to the nation's permanent peace and pros- 
perity forever removed. 

The " military situation " so far as Acton is concerned, is decidedly 
encouraging. Thus far we have fully met every requisition of the 
government, and have a sufficient surplus placed to our credit to meet 
any further demands that may be made upon us, at least for some time. 
It appears that in estimating the quotas of the different towns, on the 
late call for 500,000 men, the results of the draft of July 10, 1863, 
were taken into consideration by the government, and that the quota 
of Acton, in addition to the proceeds of that draft, for the said 500- 
000, was Jif teen, a number less by two than was at first reported, and 
raised by the recruiting committee ; so that at the present time we 
have an excess of two raised on that call, in addition to thirty-nine re- 
enlisted men and six new recruits, making in all an excess of forty- 
seven men with which to meet the call just made for another 200,000, 
and for future drafts, should there be any. 

Much credit is due to the town's recruiting committee for their per- 
sistent and well directed efforts in filling the several quotas, and thus 
bringing about these desirable results. 

The results of the draft of July 10, 1863, may be summed up as 
follows : 

Number drafted, 35. Of this number 20 were examined and ex- 
empted ; 12 were examined and accepted ; 1 enlisted prior to the 
draft ; 1 enlisted subsequent to the draft ; 1 failed to report ; making 
in all, 35. Of the 12 accepted, 11 procured substitutes, and one paid 
the commutation fee, thus making the net proceeds of that draft, 14. 



20 



Th9 names of those who procured substitutes, paid commutation 
money and enlisted, are as follows : 

Waldo G. Dunn, enlisted, Sylvanus Hunt, enlisted. 



who Procured Substitutes. 



Those 

Charles Sweatt, 

James L. Parker, 

Edwin A. Jones, 

Alonzo Hapgood, 

Varnum B. Mead 

Merrick Puffer, 

Edwin Tuttle paid commutation money. 



S. F. Hosmer, 
Charles Robbins, 2d, 
John R. Houghton, 
George Conant, 
Hiram Hapgood. 



Re-enlisted Men and Volunteers 

It was hoped that a complete list of those who have re-enlisted from 
this town might be obtained in season for this report, but as the re- 
turns from the several regiments in the field have not all been sent in 
to the Adjutant General's office, and the work of re-enlistment is still 
in progress, it was found impossible to do so. 

The following is a list of those who are known to have re-enlisted, 
and of those who have lately entered the service from this town. 
Many additions will undoubtedly be made to the number within the 
next thirty days. — ' t 

Re enlisted Men, {Veterans.) 



Capt. Wm. H. Chapman, 
1st Lieut. Silas P. Blodget, 
2d Lieut. Elias E. Haynes, 
Privates Henry Brown, 

11 Samuel R. Burroughs, 
11 John B. Cram, 
Geo. W. Cram, 
Nathan Goss, 
Wm. S. Handley, 
11 A. J. Huggins, 

Delctte H. Hall, 
" Abram Handley, 
" Gilman S. Hosmer, 
" Loring M. Jackson, 
Francis Kinsley, 
James Moulton, 
" Charles Morse, 
" Benjamin Skinner, 
" Dennis Sheahan, 
Warren L. Teel, 
Thomas Wright, 



Privates James H. Wood, 

Wm. F. B. Whitney, 
" John Wayne, 
" Lincoln E. Wheeler, 

Robert C Chaffin, 
" George W. Sawyer, 
" James W. Fiske, 
" James Braut, 
" Richard Casey, 
11 George Dale, 

John C. Fink, 
" Joseph Fasser, 
" Wm. H. Herring, 
" Richard C. Hess, 
" Charles McGuire, 

Peter W. Perry, 
" Henry Roselle, 
" Frederic R. Stromier, 

John Smith, 
" George A. Schaffer, 
" [David Kirk. 



Total, 39 men exclusive of officers. 



21 

Volunteers Lately Entered the Service. 

Thomas Kinsley, 
Oscar Dwelley, 
1 Albert Rouillard, 

Eugene L. Hall, enlisted, not sworn into service. 
Emery Lothrop, " " " " 

Charles Young, 11th Regiment. 

Total, 6. 

Wm. D. Tuttle, Town Cleric. 
Acton, March 25, 1864. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

SUPERINTENDENT OF THE SCHOOLS IN ACTON, 

FOR THE YEAR 1863-64. 



Gentlemen of the School Committee : 

It has been a question of some moment for us to decide, 
whether to say nothing about the existing evils connected 
with our schools, and write the least we possibly could 
and have it pass for a report, or to express our thoughts 
more fully, and risk being censured for trying to make 
some great display of literary talent, as some would sneer- 
ingly call it ; and, for making an extravagantly large 
printer's bill. The latter course we have, however, de- 
cided to pursue. 

And first, Ave wish to speak of our school-houses ; and 
in no very flattering term seither. We know there are a 
plenty ready to say, they are good enough ; what would be 
the use to build better ones, for the scholars to tear in 
pieces. If you should build ever so good ones, it would 
not be long before they would look as bad as these we 
now have. Why, they exclaim, " some of our school- 
houses have not been built comparatively but a short 
time, and just look at them" That is what we say, look 
at them, and carefully to ; and we think you will come to 
the sage conclusion, that they are ill planned, poorly built 



23 



shammy things. Now we want candidly to ask those who 
think they are well arranged for the convenience and 
health of scholars, and teachers, and are good enough, if 
they can give any description of them ; if they can tell 
what color they are painted, or whether they are painted 
at all. My word for it in nine cases out of ten they could 
not do it. How should they ? They never go inside of 
them, unless it is to some school-meeting in the evening, 
when there is a prospect of some trouble being fermented. 
We suppose many will consider this plain language ; and 
indeed it is so. But we believe if they could see the de- 
fects of our school-rooms, as we have for the past two 
years, they would think it none too much so. We are not 
believers in the oft repeated assertion, that our scholars 
would injure and deface a good new house, as quick as 
they would an old dingy thing, with benches without 
paint or varnish, and walls without paper. We do not 
believe the children and youth in this town are so much 
worse than they are in others ; and we know they have 
large, convenient, and even ornamental school-houses in 
other towns, and they are kept well too. We believe if 
this town would build some good school-houses, conven- 
ient and well finished, that our scholars would take pride 
in keeping them so. This, in a measure, is proved by the 
fact, that the house in the South East District was, a few 
years ago, well repaired and the walls papered ; and, not- 
withstanding the Committee who put it on was censured 
for wasting money by so doing — as the scholars would 
tear it off in one term — it remains neat and whole to this 
day, and a credit to him. We do not think it a good way 
to cultivate feelings of respect for public property, by 
having constantly before the eyes of our children defaced 
benches, dingy walls, and plastering hanging from the 
ceiling here and there, in a manner to tempt even those 
not inclined to mischief, to hit it a poke and tumble it 



24 

down ; any more than it would be a good way to cultivate 
thoughts of purity and chastity, by constantly presenting 
to the view pictures obscene and immoral. We think all 
should be as willing to be taxed to raise money to build 
good school-houses for their children to attend school in, as 
they would be to raise money to build a good town house 
to attend town meeting in, and we think if the town is able 
to have a town house worth some eight thousand dollars, 
it is able to have school-houses worth as much. 

Sustaining Teachers. — We believe there is no greater 
evil connected with our common schools, (certainly not if 
we except absenteeism,) than that of not fully sustaining 
teachers. This perhaps will apply more particularly to 
schools in the country, than to those in cities, where 
parents well understand that any interference on their 
part with the rules and regulations of teachers will not be 
tolerated. In cities, teachers usually teach years in the 
same school, while in the country, with few excep- 
tions, if the same teacher is retained in one school for 
two, or three terms at most, it is an instance truly worthy 
of comment. Now the question arises, what makes the 
difference? Simply this: in the first instance parents 
mind their own business, and allow those who are chosen 
for that purpose, to say when a teacher is doing right, or 
when he is not ; in the second instance parents are con- 
stantly intermeddling with teachers, and finding fault with 
every little thing that don't please them. A small speck 
seen in a school's horizon at the first of the term, is talked 
about and magnified, until to the view of many it be- 
comes an awful cloud, enveloping in utter darkness all 
good qualities. We do not wish to be understood, that 
we would retain in school a teacher, who did not in any 
respect try to do their duty, or who were wholly unfit for 
the position ; by no means — we would dismiss them at 
once. But committees and parents do not always agree 



25 



as to what teachers ought to be dismissed, and what not. 
Frequently parents are heard to say, what is the use to 
keep such a teacher in school ; they are not doing any 
good, the money is only being thrown away. Now*upon 
what foundation are such remarks usually based ; simply 
this ; they have heard the teacher has done thus and so. 
He has made rules that they don't think there is any need 
of, or that are right ; and that he has requested exercises of 
the scholars, that never was asked of them when they went 
to school. Ask them if they have been into the school to 
see if they have been rightly informed, and they will an- 
swer, oh, no ! we have not been near the school. On the 
other hand the Committee visits the school ; sees and in- 
vestigates for himself, and finds altogether a different state 
of affairs from what flying reports say; and can see no 
sufficient reason for dismissing the teacher. Ah ! if some 
people only knew how deeply they often injure others by 
censuring them before they know whether they have been 
rightly informed in regard to them or not, or know what 
the real motive was that actuated the censured party, or 
by what circumstances they were surrounded, how much 
trouble it would save in the world, especially in schools. 
Oft-times we hear it said of teachers, they are so proud and 
haughty they cannot speak to any one, when all the while 
they are yearning for the warm grasp of some friendly 
hand, and a word of encouragement from some parent 
who sends children to their school. Perhaps it would be 
well for those who are so particular about etiquette, to 
bear in mind that, when a stranger comes into their place 
to stop, they not he, are the ones to speak first without a 
formal introduction. We think a safe rule to go by in re- 
gard to the support of teachers is to do by them under all 
circumstances, as we would wish to have a child of our 
own d*one by, if they should go among strangers to teach. 
4 



26 



Absenteeism. — Although, in our former report we spoke 
of this, we cannot forbear saying a few words now ; for 
we believe it is one of those evils that can be remedied 
only by being constantly kept in view. Why is it that 
parents will be so blind to their own interests, and that of 
their children as not to have them attend school punctu- 
ally, if possible, and derive the full benefit of the money 
that is expended for them. The problem in one of the 
old arithmetics about the time it would take a toad to get 
out of a well, that fell back two feet every night, for three 
he got ahead in the daytime, would be a good one for 
those scholars to work out, who for every three days' at- 
tendance are absent two. They would probably find it 
would take ten or twelve terms to make that advancement 
they ought to in less than half that time. A teacher usu- 
ally has enough to do in school hours, without being hin- 
dered and perplexed by scholars who were absent the day 
before, coming to him and asking him where this and that 
lesson is. Besides they are a dead weight upon their 
classes, always tending to keep them back. It is a pity 
that all parents could not have the infinite pleasure of 
teaching one term of school ; then, though they might not 
like, they would acknowledge the justness of what we 
have said. 

We will now give a brief view of the several schools 
and teachers. 

SOUTH SCHOOL. 

E. F. Fuller, Local Committee. 
The Primary Department of this school, for the spring 
and fall terms, was taught by Miss Lottie C. Faulkner, 
the same honored teacher who has had charge of it so 
long. Under her guidance this school has made great ad- 
vancement ; not only intellectually but morally. A real 
live working teacher, neither sparing pains nor labor for 
the improvement of those committed to her care, she has 



27 



earned a reputation that any one might well feel proud 
of. At the examination of the school all the classes 
showed excellent improvement. Most of the writing- 
books — of which there were forty-two — looked neat 
and were well written, considering that most of the 
writers were but eight and ten years old — some even 
less than eight. It was evident that good attention had 
been paid to this branch of study. Another thing was 
also evident, and that was the advantage of having the 
same teacher a succession of terms. The singing by both 
boys and girls was excellent. Miss Faulkner not wishing 
to teach the winter term, the Committee finally decided to 
engage the services of Miss Helenette Colby, of War- 
ner, N. H., the teacher who taught the spring and fall 
terms of the higher department. Miss Colby labored 
with much zeal to keep the school up to its former high 
standing ; and we are pleased to say that the examination 
showed that she had successfully done this. Her method 
of teaching in this. school, though differing in some re- 
spects from their former teachers, was on the whole, so 
nearly the same, that it did not take the scholars so long to 
get acquainted with them, as is usually the case when a 
new teacher enters a school. The gymnastic exercises in 
which all the school engaged were well performed, inter- 
esting and we believe useful. The higher department for 
the spring and fall terms, was taught by Miss Colby. 
The school was a profitable one to those scholars who tried 
to govern themselves, and also avail themselves of the 
good instruction the teacher gave in the various branches 
taught. At the closing examination individual scholars, 
more than classes, showed good improvement. With the 
right stimulus to action this teacher is capable of taking 
high rank. The winter term of the higher department, 
was taught by Mr. A. E. White, the same teacher who 
taught the North school the winter previous. Of this 



28 

teacher we need say but little ; his labors will speak for 
him, as long as those scholars who stood faithfully and 
honorably by him shall live. We believe that many, 
who had before been dull, backward scholars will, as years 
roll away, look back with feelings of gratitude to this 
teacher as a true friend ; who toiled faithfully for their 
greatest good against all opposition and censure. One 
thing all admitted, even those who opposed him most, 
that their children learned first rate, and were not abused. 
The examination showed just what we expected, thorough- 
ness and great improvement. At its close, the scholars, 
to show their respect and appreciation, presented the 
teacher with a beautiful album and gold ring. 

NOKTH SCHOOL. 
Isaac T. Flagg, Local Committee. 
The spring and Ml terms of this school were taught by 
Miss Angenette Wheeler, of Acton. This was her 
first effort at school teaching, and we think a very good 
one. Mild and pleasant in her intercourse with her schol- 
ars, she so gained their good will that governing was easy. 
She labored earnestly for the advancement of her little 
charge, and was successful beyond our expectations, as 
the examination showed. Gymnastic exercises were in- 
troduced to the pleasure and profit of the school. The 
winter term of this school was placed in charge of Me. B. 
T. Kinsman, of Tuft's College. Mr. Kinsman is a young 
man of fine abilities, though quiet and unassuming in the 
school-room. Some difficulty arose in this school in re- 
gard to the division of the class in the higher reader, 
which was referred to us to decide. We decided in favor 
of the division the teacher had made ; not however to 
please him, but because we believed it right. In our 
visits to the school we noticed that the teacher seemed in- 
clined to lead his scholars to do right by good example, 



29 

rather than use coercive measures ; a course that would 
perhaps he questionable, where there are rogueish boys 
who need both combined. The classes generally made 
fair improvement ; the spelling classes in particular were 
very good. At the close of the examination the teacher 
was presented with a handsome album, which showed the 
esteem and good will of his scholars. 

SOUTH EAST SCHOOL. 
D. F. Tabbell, Local Committee. 
Miss Claka Weathebbee had charge of the spring and 
fall terms of this school. Miss Weatherbee has long been 
known to the town as a teacher of merit ; and we think 
her reputation suffered none by her effort in this school. 
In all our visits the school appeared quiet and orderly ; 
and the happy faces of the scholars showed that they were 
enjoying the hours of school. The examination passed off 
pleasantly, and showed a degree of improvement credita- 
ble to scholars and teacher. The winter term was placed 
in care of Mb. Omab A. Flint, of this town. We knew 
Mr. Flint to be a young man of excellent moral character, 
and a fine scholar ; and had no fears in giving him our ap- 
probation to enter the school but what he would keep a 
good one, though it was his first term. And he did keep 
a good and profitable school, for all those scholars who 
went to school, not to dictate as to what they should or 
should not do, but to obey the requirements of the teacher, 
and strive to the best of their ability to learn. We believe 
if the intentions of all in the district to promote the inter- 
ests of the school had been as good as the teacher's, there 
would have been no occasion to find fault. The examina- 
tion was a good one, better even than we expected ; slew- 
ing good improvement in the classes generally, a/d in 
some very good. The writing books showed gooo 1 atten- 
tion had been paid to them. We think this teaser will 
yet win a good reputation as such. / 



30 



WEST SCHOOL. 

Geo. C. Wright, Local Committee. 
The primary department of this school was taught for the 
year by Miss Susan C. Huggins. Miss Huggins has im- 
proved greatly as a teacher since the first term she had 
charge of this school. In our visits, Ave found the order 
nearer what we could wish, and her methods of teaching 
superior to what they had been. As an inevitable result 
of this, the school* made good improvement. This was 
plainly evident at the examinations, which were credit- 
able to both scholars and teacher, and we think in- 
teresting and gratifying to the parents and friends who 
were present. 

The higher department was under the instruction of 
Miss Clara II. Hapgood, for the spring and fall terms. 
Miss Hapgood commenced her labors with her accustomed 
zeal, and had it not been for her failing health, owing to 
too much care and anxiety on account of sickness at home, 
would have merited that approbation which she has al- 
ways won. The labor required to govern and teach a school 
like this, though one of the best in town, is so exhausting 
that a teacher needs to expend all their powers of body 
and mind in it to carry it forward with that success which 
would be expected. Under the circumstances, the ex- 
amination was as good as we anticipated ; showing that 
the school, if not the most profitable, was not an unprofit- 
able one. We hope, after a rest to recruit mind and 
body, Miss Hapgood will again engage in the work of 
teaching, for which she is well fitted. 

The Winter term was taught by Mr. E. Crosby, 
of Tuft's College. Mr. Crosby is a superior scholar and 
has j good faculty of imparting his ideas to others. Kind 
and courteous with his scholars, he early won their esteem 
and govjd will, so that none but inveterate rogues would 
try to tare advantage. The examination was an honest 



31 

affair, without gilt or varnish, and was very satisfactory 
to us and the large number of visitors present. There 
are some excellent classes in this school, that would re- 
flect credit upon an academy; for instance, the class in 
Analysis, and first class in Arithmetic. The wonder is, 
how the teacher accomplished so much under the un- 
favorable circumstances of an inconvenient and crowded 
school-room and so large a number of classes. 

EAST SCHOOL. 

Joseph Esterbrooks, 'Local Committee. 

The Spring and Fall terms of this school were placed 
in charge of Miss Jennie M. Harris, an old teacher, 
who had earned a good reputation by her success in 
several of the schools in town. We always found the 
school, while under her care, orderly and studious ; each 
scholar seeming to know their proper place and business. 
The school was much broken up by sickness, and five 
of its members were removed by death. Xot withstanding 
these interruptions, the examination was quite good. 
Among the classes we noticed more particularly, were those 
in Geography, the first division in Written Arithmetic 
and the Primer class. The writing books looked neat 
and showed good improvement. 

In consequence of some misunderstanding between the 
Committee and two female teachers who both laid claim 
to the school, it was decided to employ a male teacher for 
the Winter term. Accordingly the services of Mr. H. 
E. Elliot, of Tuft's College, were engaged. Mr. Elliot, 
is a young teacher, of but little experience, but he entered 
the school with the determination to have a prosperous 
one, and to a good degree was successful. Full of life 
and animation, he kept his scholars wide awake and in 
good working order. The examination showed that the 
classes in general had made fair improvement. Some 



32 

of them, especially in Reading and Spelling, did very- 
well . The exercises in Mental Arithmetic were deserving 
of particular commendation. 

CENTRE SCHOOL. 
Jonas Blodget, Local Committee. 

The primary and higher departments were united into 
one school during the Spring and Fall terms, and Miss 
Nellie J. Fletcher placed in charge. We think Miss 
Fletcher had good courage to undertake to govern and 
teach such a school as this, which, though not much larger 
than some others in town, requires much firmness and 
decision in government, and composed as it was of all 
ages and sizes, there was a large number of classes. The 
teacher labored hard, and if some thought the order was 
not all that could be desired, they must bear in mind the 
disadvantages under which the teacher was placed, and 
that none but those of the most vigorous mind and body 
could successfully meet the demands made upon them in 
such a school. At the examination, the classes in Mental 
Arithmetic, the smaller classes in Reading and the classes 
in Geography, we noticed more particularly. This school 
exhibited the best register of any of the schools ; twenty- 
six being neither absent or tardy the first term, and 
twenty-seven the second. 

Miss Fletcher also had charge of the Winter Primary. 
Here she performed a good work ; bringing the school 
under good discipline, and advancing the scholars in a 
thorough and efficient manner. The examination was 
interesting to all present ; all the classes doing well and 
showing that the school had been a profitable one. 

The higher department for the Winter term was again 
taught by Mr. Luther Conaxt, Jr. This teacher's 
history is already before the town, written by himself, 
in many of our schools, by his labors to advance their 



33 

interests. Suffice it for us to say, we think he has written 
no higher page than that of last winter. The examination 
was indeed a good one, the classes answering promptly 
and correctly, proving that both teacher and scholars had 
labored earnestly in the good work of education. 

In closing, we would say, that we think the schools, 
as a whole, have enjo}~ecl a good degree of prosperity the 
past year. Better attention has been paid to Heading, 
Spelling and Writing ; hence the schools stand higher in 
this respect than they did a year ago. Composition and 
Declamation have also claimed their share of attention in 
most of the schools, and with very good results, as we 
were pleased to witness at many of the examinations. 
There has been no change in the text books for the 
last year, although we should have liked to introduce 
Wilson's new series of Keaders, the best, we think all will 
say who carefully look them over, yet published. The 
main reason why we did not try to introduce them at the 
commencement of the Winter term was, because the agent 
was round so near the time for the schools to commence, 
that we supposed the store-keepers and many of the 
scholars would have their supply of books purchased, and 
object to making the change. We hope, however, to see 
them introduced the next term. 

We would not have the idea prevail, because we have 
spoken thus plainly in our report, that there are no true 
friends of common schools in the town of Acton, by no 
means ! for we know there are many. All that is needed 
is for them to take a firm, decided stand as such, ever 
bearing in mind the great truth once uttered by the 
learned John Quincy Adams : < ' That the best legacy a 
man could leave the world is a family of well educated 
cildren, who would be useful ornaments to society." 

E. F. RICHARDSON, Superintendent. 



REPORT OF THE LOCAL COMMITTEES. 



CENTRE SCHOOL. 



SOUTH SCHOOL. 

Appropriation, S335 43 

Balance from last year, 8 14 

Spring and Fall Terms. 

Paid Miss H. Colby, for teaching 16 weeks, at S4.50 per week, $ 72 00 

" " L. C. Faulkner, " 4.00 " 64 00 

Winter Term. 

Paid Mr. A. E. White, for teaching 12 weeks at S10.00 per week, 120 00 

" Miss H. Colby, '• " 4.50 " 54 00 

" for wood, cleaning house and building fire, 26 75 

•• <i. T. Weber, for cleaning stove-pipe, 125 

•' fur two chairs. 1 16 

" pails, brooms, dipper and chalk, 3 71 



WEST SCHOOL. 
Appropriation, S335 43 



S358 30 



Appropriation. $335 43 

Balance from last j ear, 20 93 

Spring and Fall Terms. 

Paid Miss Nellie J. Fletcher, for teaching 9 1-2 weeks, at $4.50 per 

week. $ 42 75 

" Nellie J. Fletcher, for teaching 10 weeks, at $4.50 per week, 45 00 

Winter Term. 

Paid Mr. Luther Conant, Jr., for teaching 15 weeks, at $10.00 per week, 150 00 

•' Miss Nellie J. Fletcher, " •• 4.U0 " 60 00 

" for wood, care of house, and building fire, 32 25 

•• setting glass, pails, brooms and painting blackboard, 3 67 

" " cleaning and fixing funnel, 1 25 

$334 92 

Balance, 21 44 

March 19, 1864. J. Blodget, Committee. 



§343 57 



S342 8; 



Balance, 70 

February 23, 1864. E. F. Fuller, Comvxittee. 



$335 43 



3.3 



Spring and Fall Teems. 

Paid Miss C. H. Hapgood, for teaching 16 weeks at S4.50 per week, S72 00 
" S. C Huggius, '• ■• 4.00 ,l 64 00 

Winter Term. 

Paid Mr. E. Crosby, for teaching 12 weeks at £10.25 per week, 123 00 

'• Miss 8. C. Hoggins. " 10 " 4.50 «« 45 00 

>; F. Wyman, for building fire, &c, 3 50 

" for wood, brooms and chalk, 27 65 

S335 15 

Balance, 23 

March 18, 1.864. G. C. Wright, Committee. 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last year. 



SOUTH-EAST SCHOOL. 



Spring and Fall Term?. 



S199 44 
14 23 


S213 67 


S 72 00 

105 00 

20 00 

3 87 


S200 87 
12 80 



Paid Miss C. Wetherbee. for teaching 16 weeks, at 84.50 per week, 
'• Mr. O. A. Flint, 12 " 8.75 " 

" for wood, and washing house. 
" li cleaning stove-pipe, building lire, and chalk, 

Balance, 
February 24, 1864. D. F. Tarbell, Committee. 



" SOUTH SCHOOL. 

Appropriation, S199 44 

Balance from last year, 3 30 

S202 74 

Spring and Fall Terms. 

Paid Miss A. Wheeler, for teaching 10 weeks, at S3. 50 per week, 
' ; " '• 8 " 83.62 1-2 " 

Winter Term. 

Paid' Mr. B. F. Kinsman, for teaching 14 weeks, at S8.75 per week, 
" for wood, building lire, and sweeping house, 
" '• broom, cravons, &c, 

$200 90 
Balance, 1 84 

March 4, 1864. Isaac T. Flagg, Committee. 



EAST SCHOOL. 

Appropriation, S199 44 

Balance from last year, 4 76 

S204 20 

Spring and Fall Terms. 

Paid Miss Jennie M. Harris, for teaching 20 weeks, at S4.50 per week, S 90 00 
'• Mr. Herbrrt Elliot, " 10 " 10.00 " 100 00 
" lor wood, building lire, cleaning house, 13 75 
" chalk and broom, S204 20 

February 20, 1864. Joseph Estabrook, Committee. 



8 35 00 
29 00 


122 50 

13 75 

65 



36 



STATISTICAL TABLE FOR 1863-64. 



DISTRICTS. 



Centre, 
South, 
i< 

West, 

East, 

South East. 
North, 



Centre, 
South, 

u 

West, 

East, 

South East, 
North, 



Centre, 
South, 



East, 
South East, 
North, 





03 

3 

o . 


o 


<~ 


,2 a. 


u 

■9^ 


a. 


id 


u 
o 


"3 
a 5 


NAMES OF TEACHERS. 


«*i 2 
%B 

M.S 

a 

>-3 


a 

4) 

P. 

a> 
to 


o . 

!& 

■*** 


£5 


Average nun 
of Bcholan 

Number ove 
years of ag 


Z 

! 


u 

■S3 

o 


<a o 

do • r! 
*g 

OB 4) 


SPRING TERM. 




















Nellie J. Fletcher, 


2 1-4 


$18 00 


$40 50 


57 


52 


1 





23 





Helenette Colby, 


2 


18 00 


36 00 


47 


41 


3 





6 





Lottie C. Faulkner, 


2 


16 00 


32 00 


56 


50 





3 


20 





Clara H. Hapgood, 


2 


18 00 


36 00 


46 


40 


2 





12 





Susie C. Huggins, 


2 


16 00 


32 00 


48 


35 





7 


4 





Jennie M. Harris, 


2 1-2 


18 00 


45 00 


42 


34 


2 





3 





Clara Wetherbee, 


2 


18 00 


36 00 


28 


25 


1 


2 


8 





Angenette Wheeler, 


2 1-2 


14 00 


35 00 


25 


23 


1 


3 


4 







17 1-4 


$136 00 


$292 50 


349 


300 


10 


15 






PALL TERM. 




















Nellie J. Fletcher, 


2 1-2 


$18 00 


$45 00 


54 


49 








27 


30 


Helenette Colby, 


2 


18 00 


36 00 


49 


41 


6 





14 


56 


Lottie C. Faulkner, 


2 


16 00 


32 00 


57 


48 





1 


18 


67 


Clara H. Hapgood, 
Susie C. Huggins, 


2 


18 00 


36 00 


48 


40 


2 





5 


56 


2 


16 00 


32 00 


52 


40 





6 


4 


48 


Jennie M. Harris, 


2 1-2 


18 00 


45 00 


32 


24 











36 


Clara Wetherbee, 


2 


18 00 


36 00 


25 


20 





1 


3 


16 


Angenette Wheeler, 


2 


14 50 


29 00 


22 


18 





3 


1 


31 




17 


$136 50 


$291 00 


339 


280! 8 


11 






WINTER TERM. 


















Luther Conant, Jr., 


3 3-4 


$40 00 


$150 00 


47 


42 15 





11 


75 


Nellie J. Fletcher, 


3 3-4 


16 00 


60 00 


31 


29 


2 


12 


35 


Alphonso E. White, 


3 


40 00 


120 00 


61 


54 23 





10 


55 


Helenette Colby, 


3 


18 00 


54*00 


58 


50 





12 


60 


Erastus Crosby, 


3 


40 00 


123 00 


61 


54 22 





8 


90 


Susie C Huggins, 


3 


18 00 


54 00 


52 


41 





1 


45 


Herbert Elliott, 


2 1-2 


40 00 


100 00 


41 


33 8 





2 


30 


Omar A. Flint, 


3 


35 00 


105 00 


36 


23 10 





1 


13 


B. F. Kinsman, 


3 1-2 


35 00 


122 50 


26 


22 11 


1 


4 


44 




28 1-2 


$283 00 


$888 50 


453 


348 


89 


3 







REPORTS 



OF THE 



SELECTMEN AND OTHER OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON, 



FROM 



FEBRUARY 26, 1864, TO FEBRUARY 26, 1865, 



INCLUDING THE 



BIRTHS, MARRIAGES AND DEATHS IN 1864, 



ALSO, 



The Report of the School Committee, 



CONCORD : 

PRINTED BY BENJAMIN TOLMAN. 

1865. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



RECEIPTS. 

Amount received, $19,532 74- 



EXPENDITURES. 

SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 

Paid. 

George C. "Wright, for West School, 
James E. Harris, for South School, 
William W. Davis, for Centre School, 
Daniel Fletcher, for South East School, 
Isaac T. Flagg, for North School, 
Joseph Estabrook, for East School, 
Town of Littleton, 



$377 


04 


377 


04 


377 


04 


224 


19 


224 


19 


224 


19 


5 


50 



REPAIRS ON SCHOOL HOUSES. 
Paid. 
George C. Wright, for repairs on West school 

house, . $9 86 

James E. Harris, do. do., South do., 82 97 

William W. Davis, do. do., Centre do., 1 48 

Isaac T. Flagg, do. do., North do., 19 64 

Joseph Estabrook, do. do., East do., 34 90 



BOOKS AND PRINTING. 
Paid. 

Harris Cowdry, for books delivered to the town, $4 00 

" " do. do., to poor families, 9 12 

Daniel Jones, do. do., J. Whitney's children, 121 



$1,809 19 



$148 85 



Vil 


iliam D. 


Tuttle, for highway tax book, 


1 08 


roi 


printin. 


g dog notices, 


1 75 


a 


tt 


town warrants, 


5 00 


u 


u 


voting list, 


7 50 


a 


u 


• selectmen's report, 


9 50 


u 


u 


pamphlet reports 


74 79 


u 


u 


notices to road builders, 


1 25 







$115 20 

DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 

Paid John E. Cutter, discount on taxes, $510 23 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

Paid. 

E. C. Parker, for repairs on highway in '62, $3 34 

Isaac Barker, " " '63, 5 38 

Luther Conant, Jr., " " '63, 6 00 

Francis Kinsley, " " '64, 19 13 

" K grading hill in West Acton, 1,385 00 

" " building sluice on gravel pit 

road, * 5 00 

William W. Davis, for repairs on highway, 6 55 

Nehemiah Curtis, " " 13 07 

Silas Conant, Jr., " " 3 00 

" " " breaking roads, 1 67 

James E. Billings, " " ' 3 33 



$1,451 47 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR SO 
Paid. 

For State Aid, 

Recruiting twenty-two men, 
Entertaining 'Co. E, April 19, 


LDIEI 

'64, 


fcS AND FAft 

$1,858 69 

4,499 67 

50 00 


[ILIES. 

$6,408 36 







SUPPORT OF POOR. 

Paid. 

James E. Billings, journey to Boston respecting 

Sarah Childs, $1 50 

James E. Billings, journey to Waltham respect- 
ing John H. Whitney, 3 00 
For support and burial expenses of Wm. Kendall, 20 00 
of Thomas Law, 3 57 
Catherine Chaffln, 11 22 
William Murphy, 13 94 
Clarissa Nutting, 52 00 



u 


u 


of 


u 


u 


u 


a 


(( 


u 


u 


l( 


a 



For support of Sarah Childs, 12 00 

" " " Mrs. J. W. Fitzpatrick, 11 11 

wood for Widow Knapp. 7 00 

Dr. Harris Cowdry, for attending Catherine 

Chaffin. 3G 00 

Dr. Isaiah Hutching, do. do., William Murphy, 29 12 









REST 




NOTES AND 


INTE 




Paid. 










Ebenezer Conant, note and interest, 


$1,0 


Daniel L. Veazey, 


a 






107 21 


Charles H. Blood, " 


a 






113 17 


Augustine Conant. 


a 






240 00 


Frederick Rouillard, 


n 






90 00 


Daniel Harris, 


a 






46 32 


Isaac T. Flagg, 


t< 






6 00 


Joel Hanscom, 


41 






40 80 


Elbridge J. Bobbins, 


U 






25 00 


Silas P. Blodgett, 


.. 






72 G7 


David M. Handley, 


U 






12 00 







$200 4G 



81,830 47 

TOWN OFFICERS. 

Paid. 

Edward F. Richardson, for examining teachers, superin- 
tending schools and making report, $50 00 
Samuel Hosmer, for taking inventory and making taxes 

ten days, 
Samuel Hosmer,. for copying valuation, 
Eben. Davis, for taking inventory and making taxes, 

nine and one-half days, 
William D. Tuttle, for taking inventory and making 
taxes, 
copying assessors' valuation book, 

" taxes, 
two days making money tax, 
distributing tax books, 
collecting and recording 29 births, 
recording 43 deaths, 

" 26 marriages, 
services as town clerk, 
John E. Cutter, for collecting taxes for '63, 
James E. Billings, for services as selectman, 
Jonas K. Putney, " " 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, 

$330 32 



u 


u 


a 


u 


a 


u 


u 


a 


a 


u 


u 


u 


a 


u 


u 


u 


t( 


(C 


a 


u 


a 


u- 


a 


u 



25 


00 


7 


00 


23 


75 


18 


75 


7 


00 


3 


12 


5 


00 


1 


00 


5 


80 


G 


30 


2 


60 


20 


00 


75 


00 


38 


00 


12 


00 


30 


00 



6 

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 
Paid. 

Luther Conant, Jr., for meeting County Commissioners, $1 50 
Daniel Tuttle, " " " " 1 50 

Daniel H. Wetherbee, for labor at the East Cemetery, 49 00 

Zoheth Taylor, " « " 

William D. Tuttle, " " " 

" " for material and fencing do., 

Phineas Wetherbee, labor at West Cemetery, 
Francis Conant, for repairing town hall chimney, 
William D. Tuttle, services in letting out hill at West 

Acton, 
Daniel Fletcher, for building wall at cemetery, 
Dr. H. A. Barrett, professional sendees rendered Dixon 

and Ogle, 
George W. Todd, for transporting firemen to Acton, 
John E. Cutter, for summonsing 21 persons to take oath 
of office, March 5, '63, 
" " " do. do., 7 persons, April 10, '63, 
" " " do. do., 22 persons, March 4, '64, 
" " " getting dogs licensed, 
" " " stamps on notes, 
For set of measures, 

Moses Tajdor, for sendees in reducing number of en- 
rolled militia, 
Varnum B. Mead, do. do., 
Daniel Wetherbee, do. do., 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, do. do., 
James E. Billings, do. do., 
George Proiury, for tolling bell for 5 deaths, 
George Harris, do. do., 1 do., 
Quince3 r A. Fletcher, do. do., 23 do., 
Hiram J. Hapgood. do. do., 8 do., 
For table for town hall, 

" wood do. do., 
George M. Brooks, for advice respecting grading hill at 

West Acton, 
George Harris, for opening town hall 77 times, 
For 33 gallons oil and 1 pint fluid, 

2 dozen lamp wicks, 

coal for town hall, 

two dampers for stove in town hall, 

seven lamp chimnies for town hall, • 

one chimney brush for town hall, 

one broom, 

cleaning and leveling cellar of town hall, 

repairing and putting up pump, 

glazing at town hall, 

repairing clock and taking care of same, 



7 


50 


3 


00 


4 


24 


5 


00 


8 


50 


3 


00 


27 


00 


25 


00 


6 


00 


2 


62 




88 


2 


75 


1 


00 


2 


58 


1 


50 


3 


00 


8 


75 


8 


00 


8 


25 


10 


36 


1 


00 




20 


4 


60 


1 


60 


22 00 


6 


06 


2 


00 


60 00 


29 


30 




72 


31 


39 


1 


25 




87 




17 




25 


1 


50 




50 




15 


24 


2G 



Fletcher and Tarbell, for burial of 40 persons, 80 00 

" u " recording 45 deaths, 

u " " coffin for state pauper, 

Levi Dow, for damage to sleigh on highway near John 

Hapgood's, 
For rope for monument, 

lamps for town hall, 

express, postage and stationery, 

8527 45 



4 


50 


9 


85 


11 


00 


2 


25 


34 


00 


7 


10 



CONDITION OF- THE TREASURY FEBRUARY 26, 18G5. 



Receipts. 

Balance in Treasury Feb. 26, 1864, $2,286 66 

State Tax for 1864^ 2,424 00 

County Tax for 1864, 746 10 

Town Grant for 1864, 5,000 00 

" " for schools, 1,700 00 

Highway Deficiencies, 57 33 

Overlay on Taxes, 127 76 

Corporation Tax, 479 40 

State Aid to Jan. 1st, 1864, 2,431 21 

School money from town of Concord, 20 00 

Borrowed money, 3,893 30 

Cash of E. F. Richardson, for school books, 29 11 

State School Fund, 83 72 
Cash from town of Groton, for support of 

Clarissa Nutting, 52 00 

Received for use of Town Hall, 122 50 

Cash from Almshouse, 10 79 

For lumber, oil, &c," G8 86 



819,532 74 



Expenditures* 

For support of schools, $1,809 19 

repairs on school houses, 148 85 

books and printing, 115 20 

discount on taxes, 510 23 

roads and bridges, 1,451 47 

appropriation for soldiers and families, 6,408 36 

support of poor, 200 46 

Town Officers, 330 32 

notes and interest, 1,830 47 

miscellaneous expenses, 527 45 



For State tax, 2,424 00 

County tax, 746 10 



$16,502 10 



Balance in Treasury Feb. 26, 1865. $3,030 64 



FINANCIAL CONDITION OF THE TOWN FEB. 26, 1865. 

Dk. 
To balance as per report, Feb. 26, 1865, $3,030 64 
amount due from the State for aid 

furnished families of soldiers, *2,188 47 



$5,219 11 



AMOUNT DUE ON NOTES. 
Cr. 

By Cash of Jonas K. Putney, $1,077 30 

John R. Whitcomb, 500 00 

Calvin Harris, 200 00 

James A. Billings, ' 200 00 

Daniel Harris, " 805 34 

Frederick Rouillard, 1,700 00 

David M. Handley, 200 00 

Mathew McKinney, 100 00 

Joel Hanscom, 680 00 

Augustine Conant, 4,000 00 

Eben Conant, 3,500 00 

Silas P. Blodgett, 1,211 27 

James Keyes, 600 00 

John Wood, 500 00 

Elbridge J. Bobbins, 500 00 

Daniel Wetherbee, ' 1,500 00 

Isaac T. Flagg, 100 00 

Interest on notes, 823 00 



$18,196 91 



Balance against the Town Feb. 26, 1865, without 
including the balance due as per Overseers' 
report for 1865, $12,977 80 



AMOUNT OF STATE AID PAID EACH PERSON. 

Paid. 

Mrs. Betsey M. Sawyer, $144 00 

Charlotte M. Pike, 144 00 

Maria Fisk, 144 00 



Mrs. Betsy Shehan, 

S. II. Wetherbee, 
Catharine Dwelley, 
• Margaret Moore, 
Sally Veazey, 
Margaret Fitzpatrick, 
Mr. Thomas Kinsley, 
Miss Henrietta Goss, 
Mrs. Joanna Monlton, 
Elvira Young, 
Annie Dole, 
Martha Wayne, 
Anna Whitney, 
Fannie Stevens, 
Sarah J. Skinner, 
Charlotte Blood, 
Hattie S. Jackson, 
Anna E. Robbins, 
Sarah J. Taft, 
Johanna Colman, 
Nancy Huggins, 
Mary Hurley, 





144 


00 




144 


00 




144 


00 




132 


00 




103 


20 




98 


80 




96 


00 




GO 


00 




54 


00 




52 


00 




52 


00 




52 


00 




44 


28 




42 


42 




36 


00 




35 


00 




35 


00 




33 


57 




31 


00 




19 


28 




17 


00 




13 


14 

ft1 870 


James E. 


Billings, 


\ Selectmen 


Jonas K. 


Putney, 


of 


J. K. W. 


Wetherbee, . 


; Acton. 



Acton, Feb. 26, 1865. 



REPORT OF THE 

R E C E I V T S A N I) E X P E N 1) 1 T U B E S , 

AT THE 

ALMSHOUSE, IN ACTON, 
Fou the Year Ending April 1st, 1865. 



ARTICLES ON HAND, APRIL 1st, 1865. 

1 pair oxen, $210, 1 horse, 70,00, 8280 00 

9 cows, 360, 2 shotes, 35,00, 

3 1-2 tons hay, 105, 12 bush, corn, 18,00 
7 bush, rye, 12,25, 8 bush, oats, 6,40, 
47 bush, potatoes, 37,60, 10 fowls, 5,00, 
300 lbs. pork, 60,00, 100 lbs. beef, 15,00, 
76 lbs. ham, 16,72, 25 lbs. butter, 7,50, 
18 lbs. lard, 3,78, 15 lbs. candles, 3,00, 

4 lbs. tallow, .56, 26 lbs. dried apple, 5,20, 
1 lb. tea, 1,50, 3 lbs. coffee, .39, 2 lbs. sugar, .40, 
3-4 bbl. flour, 9,00, 3 bush, beans, 6,37, 
55 M. skewers, 27,50, skewer timber, 4,00, 
1 bl)l. soap, 4,00, 1 bbl. pickles, 2,0U, 
1 bag salt, 3,00, 10 bush, ashes, 1,25, 
1 bush, rye meal, 1,75, 1 bush. Indian meal, 1,50, 

$1,033 67 



395 


00 


123 


00 


18 


05 


42 


60 


75 


00 


24 


22 


6 


78 


5 


76 


2 


21) 


15 


37 


31 


50 


6 


00 


4 


25 


3 


25 



RECEIPTS. 

For milk, $422,85, oxen, 713, $1,135 85 

apples, 125,07, pork, 73,19, eggs, 9,20, 207 46 

skewers, 61,40, poultry, 25,73, 87 13 

calves, 24,50, labor, 17,00, shote, 8,00, 49 50 

boarding E. C. Brown, 4,00, squashes, 2,50, 6 50 

keeping pedlers, 4,00, hide, 5,51, 9 51 

straw, 21,70, peaches, 12,00, peas, .33, 34 03 

old iron, 2,25, pasturing calf, 1,10, 3 35 



11 



For use of horse, .25, use of oxen, .75, 
cash of P. Smith, .58, hat, .30, 
potatoes, 3,25. work at cemetery, 10,25, 
work on road, 



1 


00 




88 


13 


50 


11 


33 



$1,560 04 



EXPENDITURES. 

Flour. 817.25, butter, 89,71, cheese, 14,98, $151 94 

Molasses, 42,94, sugar, 15,89, tea, 11,50, 70 33 

Coffee, 13.57. meatr.sl.99. fish, 7.00, tripe, 3,36, 105 92 

Rye, 26,80, meal, 79,90, salt, 8,23, 114 93 

Cloth and clothing, 60.70, shoes, 1.10, bread, 2,58, 64 38 

Spices, 5.24. saleratus, .12, starch, .24. sage, .42, 6 02 

Cream of tartar, .40, soap, .21, yeast, 1,00, oil, 3,53, 5 14 

Soda, .34. saltpetre, .50, spirits, .17, seeds, 4,29, 5 30 

Camphor, .24, potash. 7,03, matches, .60, 7 87 

Sour milk, 7,20, medicines, 1.12. tobacco, 7,66, 15 98 

Grass, 2,00, hay, 34,27, plaster, 2,00, 38 27 

Scraps, 12,18, skewer timber, 9,75, sink, 2,50, ■ 24 43 

Tools, 8,58, earthen ware, 5,59, tin ware, 2,50, 16 67 

Glass and putty, .90, nails, 1,62, castings, 1,26, 3 78 

Grafting, .75, repairing pump, 5,00, ropes, 1,42, 7 17 

Brooms, 1.50, whips, .42, oil cloth, .80, shot, .36, 3 08 

Coffin and robe, 7,50, cash to paupers, 1,85, 9 35 

Grape vines. 2,00, twine and wicking, .62, 2 62 
Newspaper, 2,70, use of winnowing mill and cradle, 1,00, 3 70 

Use of bull, 2,00, use of pasture, 20,00, 22 00 

Shotes, 16,50, blacksmith's bill, 16.40, 32 90 

Stove, 15,00, Dr. Cowdry's bill, 5,25, 20 25 

Cows, 44,00, oxen, 525,45, barrels, 5,25, 574 70 

Use of wagon and cart, 8,00, expenses to Boston, 7,99, 15 99 

Weighing oxen, 24 

Services of Mr. and Mrs. D. H. TTetherbee, 300 00 

James E. Billings' services, 6 00 

Jonas K. Putney's services, 6 00 

J. K. W. AVetherbee's, services, 6 00 



Amount of inventory, April 1, 1864, $891 82 

Interest on farm, 239 40 



$1,640 96 

81.131 22 

$2,772 18 



12 



RECAPITULATION. 

Amount of expenditures, $1,640 96 

Amount of receipts, $1,560 04 

Cash from town treasury to balance account, 80 92 

$1,640 96 

Total amount of expenditures, $1,640 96 

Amount of inventory, April 1, 1864, 891 82 

Interest on the farm, 239 40 

$2,772 18 

Total amount of receipts, $1,560 04 

Amount of inventory, April 1, 1865, 1,033 67 



:,593 71 



$178 47 
Expense of victualing foreigners, 10 40 



Total amount of supporting poor in Almshouse, $168 07 

Whole number of persons (exclusive of foreigners) supported 
in the almshouse, 5 ; average number, 4 ; present number, 3 ; cost 
per week, 81 cents. 

James E. Billings, \ Overseers 
Jonas K. Putney, > of 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, } Poor. 

Acton, April 1, 1865. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



BIRTHS RECORDED IN ACTOX, FOR THE YEAR END- 
ING DEC. 31st, 18G4. 



No. Date of Birth. Names of Children. Names of Parents. 

1. Jan. 4, Iii Concord. Eunice Elizabeth Malloy, daughter of 

Thomas and Fanny Malloy. 

2. Jan. G, Frank Marion Shurtleff, son of Isaac M. and Sarah 

E: Shurtleff. 

3. Jan. 20, Estella L. Hosmer, daughter of John E. and Emma 

E. Hosmer. 
• 4. Feb. 28, Alice Gertrude Gardner, daughter of George and 
Violetta F. Gardner. 

5. Feb. 28, George Frank Kendall, son of George M. and Henri- 
etta Kendall. 

G. March 5, Hiram Edward Gates, son of George W. and Mary 
Gates. 

7. March 19, Albertie S. T utile', daughter of Varnum and Sarah 

L. Tuttle. 

8. May 2, Herman Otis Hartwell, son of Henry and Augusta H. 

Hartwell. 

9. May 10, Frank Lovell Hosmer, son of David W. and Harriet 

C. Hosmer. 
10 — 11. June 4, Helen Lizzie Davis; and Freddie Warren Davis, 
twin children of William W. and Martha Davis. 

12. June 11, Carrie Estella White, daughter of John and Sarah A. 

White. 

13. June 26, Abbie McDonald, daughter of Walter and Louisa G. 

McDonald. 

14. July 12, Alice Marion Lamb, daughter of Charles B. and 

Marion M. Lamb. 

15. July 15, Edgar Horace Johnson, son of George E. and Mary 

L. Johnson. 
1G. Jul}' 16, Patrick Powers, son of John and Eliza Powers. 
17. Aug. 1, Mary Ann Hammond, daughter of Thomas W. and 

Mary Alice Hammond. 



14 



18. Aug. 23, A son to Daniel and Mary McCarthy. 

19. Sept. 8, Charles Lincoln Wood, son of Winthrop E. and 

Lydia A. Wood. 

20. Sept. 18, George Robinson, son of Charles and Percis V. 

Robinson. 

21. Sept. 21, Horace Frederic Tuttle, son of William D. and Eliz- 

abeth B. Tuttle. 

22. Oct. 8, Rosella Estabrook, daughter of Joseph and Nancy 

Estabrook. 

23. Nov. 13, Arthur B. Robbins, son of Simon and Nancy D. 

Robbins. 

24. Dec. 1, Samuel H. Tuttle, son of Francis 2d and Sarah E. 

Tuttle. 

25. Dec. 11, Arthur Edwin Holirfan, son of Nelson and Charlotte 

A. Holman. 

26. Dec. 12, Arthur B. Weld, son of Marcellus and Maria L. 

Weld. 

27. Dec. 24, A daughter to Warren and Lydia A. Houghton. 

28. Dec. 24, Albert Henry Smith, son of Henry M. and Abbie B. 

Smith. 
Aug. 20, 1863, Mary Elizabeth Cash, daughter of Hugh and Re- 
becca B. Cash. 



MARRIAGES RECORDED IN ACTON, IN 1864. 

No. Date of Marriage. Karnes of Parties. 

1. Jan. 2, Augustus B. Clarke, of New York Cit} T , and Miss Helen 

E. Cowdrey, of Acton. 

2. Jan. 2, Nelson Holman, of Harvard, and Miss Charlotte A. 

Conant, of Acton. 

3. Jan. 7, Charles II. Kidder, of Acton, and Miss Frank S. Fiske, 

of Saco, Me. 

4. Feb. 2, Justin Brigham, of Acton, and Miss Ann McGurty, of 

Stow. 

5. March 13, John F. Blood, Jr., and Miss Emma F. Robbins, 

both of Acton. 

6. March 22, Norman Chaplin, of Acton, and Miss Lucinda A. 

Bride, of Berlin. 

7. April 6, Henry L. Sawyer, and Miss Lucy A. Fuller, both of 

Acton. 

8. April 20, William F. B. Whitney, of Acton, and Miss Annie 

McNernie, of Boston. 

9. April 21, Silas P. Blodget, and Miss Anna E. Jones, both of 

Acton. 
10. March 31, Cyrus Hosmer, of Acton, and Miss Mary E. Hutch- 
ins, of Westford. 



15 

11. April 28, Joseph Noyes, of Acton, and Mrs. Dolly Piper, of 

Boston. 

12. April 30, Jeremiah Sheahan, of Acton, and Miss Hannah Col- 

lins, of Concord. 

13. July 10, Francis E. Harris, and Miss Mandana S. Robbins, 

both of Acton. 

14. Sept. 6, Francis E. White, of Needham, and Miss Sarah E. 

Knight, of Framingham. 

15. Sept. 1, Albert T. Edmonds, of Acton, and Miss Mary M. 

G-arfield, of Wayland. 

16. Sept. 7, Edwin C. Parker, of Acton, and Miss Hannah Hv 

Barry, of Ovid, N. Y. 

17. Oct. 8, 'Patrick Maloney, of Acton, and Miss Catherine Love, 

of Concord. 

18. Oct. 19, Lewis E. Fletcher, and Miss Lucy E. McCraken, both 

of Acton. 

19. Oct. 30, George F. Proctor, of Littleton, and Miss Susannah 

C. Chaffin, of Acton. 

20. Nov. 20, Walter A. Gilmore, and Miss Emeline A. Robbins, 

both of Acton. 

21. Nov. 20, Warren B. Ball, and Miss Sophia L. Chaplin, both of 

Acton. 

22. Nov. 27, Allen G. Smith, of Westford, and Miss Harriet E. 

Robbins, of Acton. 

23. Dec. 4, Henry Brown, of Acton, and Miss Carrie A. Brooks, 

of Stow. 

24. March 7, Marcellus Weld, of Acton, aud Miss Maria L. Gold- 

smith, of Andover. 

25. Dec. 18, Charles II. Edmonds, and Miss Annie Briggs, both 

of Acton. 

26. Oct. 10, Peter Lynch, of Acton, and Mrs. Joanna Ogle, of 

Stow. 



DEATHS RECORDED IN ACTON, IN 1864. 

No. Date of Death. Name and Age of Deceased. 

1. Jan. 5, Elmer Ellsworth Jackson, son of Loring M. and Har- 

riet Jackson, aged 1 year, 9 months. 

2. Jan. 11, Mrs. Louisa Fredericks, aged Qb years. 

3. Jan. 14, Livonia W. Thomas, daughter of Henry C. and 

Amanda M. Thomas, aged 4 yrs. 8 mos. 27 days. 

4. Feb. 11, John Murphy, son of Daniel and Elizabeth J. Mur- 

phy, aged 2 yrs. 7 mos. 26 days. 

5. March 17, Mr. Benjamin F. Ilapgood, aged 58 yrs. 4 mos, 14 

days. 

6. March 17, Mr. Nathaniel Hapgood, Jr., aged 47 }ts. 

7. March 20, Mr. Lewis Rouillard, aged 80 yrs. 4 mos. 



k; 

8. April 8, Mr. Richard Moulton, aged 65 yrs, mos. 

9. Feb. 22, Mr. William Kendall, of Dracut, aged 56 yrs. 

10. April 27, Mrs. Sally Hosmer, wife of Mr. Jonathan Hosmer, 

aged 81 3-ears. 

11. May 8, Everett Giles, son of Israel II. and Lucy Giles, aged 

12 j'rs. 8 mos. 8 days. 

12. May 28, John Nye, son of John and Clara F. Nye, aged 2 

yrs. 9 mos. 

13. June 8, Mrs. Clara B. Nutting, aged 44 yrs. 

14. June 16, Mrs. Julia L. Edmonds, aged 40 yrs. 

15. June 24, Miss Fatty Smith, aged 80 yrs. 

16. June 27, David T. Kinsley, son of Richard and Eliza Kinsley, 

aged 3 yrs. 

17. June 28, Hattie E. Teel, daughter of William II. and Mary E. 

Teel, aged 1 yr. 

18. July 6, Mrs. Lucinda W. Robbins, aged 59 yrs. 10 mos. 12 

days. 

19. July 15, Albert F. McDonald, son of George and Mary Mc 

Donald, aged 1 yr. 2 mos. 24 days. 

20. July 17, Abbie McDonald, daughter of Walter and Louisa G. 

McDonald, aged 21 days. 

21. Juhy 31, Mrs. Catherine E. Chaflin, widow of Lewis Chaffin, 

aged 39 yrs. 

22. Aug. 1, Robert H. Todd, son of James and Margaret C. Todd, 

aged 1 yr. 1 mo. 18 days. 

23. Aug. 15, Lyman Edwards Conant, son of Luther Jr., and 

Celeste J. Conant, aged 2 yrs. 6 mos. 21 days. 

24. Aug. 24, An infant child of Daniel and Mary McCarthy, aged 

1 day. 

25. Sept. 7, Mrs. Dolly H. Wright,, widow of Mr. Joel Wright, 

aged 70 } r rs. 11 mos. 

26. Sept. 8, Herbert Augustine Conant, son of Luther Jr., and 

Celeste J. Conant, aged 1 yr. 1 mo. 7 days. 

27. Sept. 11, Mary A. Kinsley, daughter of Richard and Eliza 

Kinsley, aged 13 yrs. 3 mos. 

28. Sept. 17, Mr. Simon Turtle, aged 71 yrs. 7 mos. 10 days. 

29. Sept. 19, Martha C. Cutler, daughter' of Elisha II. and Mary 

E. Cutler, aged 5 yrs. mos. 24 days. 
.30. Sept. 20, Mr. James Ke3 T es, aged 89 yrs. 7 mos. 7 days. 

31. Oct. 9, Freddie W. Davis, son of William W. and Martha 

Davis, aged 4 mos. 5 days. 

32. Oct. 16, Dora E. Curtis, daughter of Nehemiah aud Martha 

C. Curtis. . 

33. Oct. 30, Mrs. Hannah McCarthy, aged 84 yrs. 

34. Nov. 10, Mr. Jonas Handley, aged 57 yrs. 

35. Noa\ 25, Mr. Artemas M. Rowell, aged 42 yrs. 1 mo. 8 days. 

36. Dec. 14, Mr. William Reed, aged 83 yrs. 4 mos. 14 days. 

37. Dec. 22, Mr. John Putnam, son of Cyrus and Eliza Putnam, 

aged 30 yrs. 8 mos. 20 days. 



17 

Hilton, son of Richard 
Moulton, aged 22 yrs. 2 mos. 9 days. 



38. Dec. 27, Mr. Charles H. Moulton, son of Richard and Joanna 



SOLDIERS IN U. S. SERVICE. 

No. Date of Death. Name and Age of Deceased. 

1. April 10, Francis Kinsley, 2d, Go. E. 2Gth Regt., aged 21 yrs. 

6 mos. 20 days, son of Thomas and Maria Kins- 
ley, died in Acton, while on furlough. 

2. Nov. 10, Thomas Kinsley, Jr., Co. E. 26th Regt., aged 1G yrs. 

son of Thomas and Maria Kinsley, died at Camp 
Fry Hospital, in Washington, D. C, of disease 
contracted while in service. 

3. Dec. 8, John A. Brown, color bearer in Co. E, 26th Regt., 

aged 25 yrs., died in hospital, at Winchester, Va., 
of a wound received in the battle of Winchester. 

4. Sept. 19, Eugene L. Hall, Co. E, 26th Regt., aged 19 yrs. 6 

mos. 8 clays, son of Enoch and Emeline Hall, was 
killed at the battle of Winchester, Ya. 

5. May 13, Cyrus H. Stockwell, son of Ira and Maria Stockwell, 

aged 31 yrs. 10 mos., died at New Orleans, La., 
of a wound received at the battle of Sabine Cross 
Roads. 

• 

William D. Tuttle, Town Clerk. 

Acton, March 25, 1865. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 

FOR THE YEAR 1864-65. 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

The School Committee respectfully submit their annual 
report. 

As we review the character of our schools the past year, 
we believe we can truly say that they have, in a good degree, 
been successful. To be sure they have not attained that 
excellence at which we aim, but have made general progress. 
We see not a few imperfections in them, but these are to be 
found in every department of human effort. Although what 
the common schools accomplish for our youth is invaluable, 
yet many might improve the advantages they afford much 
better. There are scholars in town who possess a tolerably 
good knowledge of the common branches, and have more or 
less acquaintance with some of the higher ones, but these 
are comparatively few. We believe our schools furnish the 
opportunity, for every scholar of common abilities, of 
acquiring a fair knowledge of the common branches before 
they become of proper age to leave school. 

We think, as a general thing, parents feel a commendable 
degree of interest in the prosperity of the schools. This is 
evinced by their occasional visits and large attendance at 
examinations. Every parent should feel that he has a great 
personal interest in the district school ; that when it is in 
successful operation he is being greatly benefited, but when 
it is going wrong he is a great loser. The common school 
has done a great deal for Massachusetts. While in point of 
territory she is but a scrap of the country's surface, and 
while other states are outstripping her in population, almost 
rivalling empires, Massachusetts is heard and honored in the 



2 

councils of the nation. If we would have her continue 
to occupy her distinguished position ; if we would not have 
her sink unseen and unheard among majestic states, we must 
nurse, with a mother's affection and much expense, her 
common school system. It is said that nothing develops the 
talents of a people like war, and doubtless the North is 
indebted in no small degree to the success she has already 
achieved in her conflict with the South, to the general diffu- 
sion of knowledge among her people. Knowledge enables 
a people to avail themselves of the appliances of war, and to 
employ with discretion the resources of the land. 

As we have already remarked, our schools are not free from 
imperfections, to some of which we would call the attention 
of the town. We refer to them in a general manner, not 
wishing to be personal. 

Attendance. Considerable time and money are thrown 
away by scholars being tardy and absent. The average 
attendance in some of the schools seems much below what it 
need to be, some terms it being but little more than seventy- 
five per cent. If this were the case with all our schools, 
several hundred dollars of the sum appropriated by the 
town would be absolutely lost. This shows that there are 
not a few parents who either do not know where their children 
are during school hours, or else do not appreciate education 
as they ought. Parents can in a great measure correct this 
evil. If our schools are what they should be, scholars are 
made both wiser and better by being punctual and regular, 
and the rising generation of men and women will be more or 
less cultivated and accomplished according to the improve- 
ment of the privileges the common schools afford. It 
presents a bad omen for the future prospects of a lad to hear 
of his playing truant. If parents would save their children 
from degradation and perhaps crime, they must not suffer it. 
If a youth is so indifferent to study as to run away from 
school, there is reason to fear he may be engaged in some 
vicious employment while absent. A scholar not only loses 
the hours he is absent, but discourages the teacher's efforts 



in his behalf, is thrown off the track with regard to his 
studies, and thereby mortifies and discourages himself. The 
money and time devoted to our schools is more precious than 
diamonds, and the children of parents who lightly esteem 
them are to be pitied. Not a few children receive all the 
opportunities for education they ever enjoy in the common 
schools, and such certainly have no school hours to idle away. 
We think some of the children of this town are taken out of 
school quite too young. The services of those who are 
made to forego the privileges of school in so early youth must 
be very valuable. 

Thorough Instruction. In some of our schools we witness 
a lack of thorough teaching. A sufficient amount of ground 
is passed over, but only the surface is touched. Half under- 
standing a principle does not give a scholar a practical 
knowledge of it. We desire that our children may possess 
such an education as they can employ in the various transac- 
tions of life. Merely committing rules to memory does not 
furnish such an education. The scholar needs to become 
acquainted with the principles upon which the rules are 
founded. To acquire this knowledge requires thorough 
instruction and close application, but when attained it is 
invaluable. When explaining a principle, the teacher must 
aim to get the attention of his pupils. It amounts to but 
little to talk to sleepy or inattentive scholars. Children 
often need more than is found in the text book to animate 
them. Almost any one can read off questions, but to 
elucidate principles in an attractive manner requires talents 
of a high order. A good deal of oral instruction may be 
given in connection with every branch of study, and should 
be, even if quite so many questions are not put out from the 
book. The eye may be made to assist the understanding in 
no small degree. One knows what he sees with his own 
eyes. By means of the blackboard, maps, charts and globes, 
a great deal of knowledge may be presented to the eye 
which helps to a ready comprehension of the subject. A 
good teacher will seek as many channels as possible through 



which to impart instruction. It should be required of the 
pupils to answer correctly. A mistake of a word or two 
may perhaps altogether destroy the sense, so that not getting 
it all right may render useless what is acquired. To write 
compositions is a very profitable exercise. It learns one to 
spell correctly, to think comprehensively, to argue sensibly, 
and converse elegantly. It assists in acquiring a knowledge 
of grammar, and cultivates a power of thought and expression 
very desirable in life. Scholars should be encouraged by 
parents and teachers to write compositions. We believe 
many of our pupils are inclined to drop the study of Mental 
Arithmetic much too soon. Children should be put into this 
branch of study early, and not dismiss it until they have 
mastered the series now in use in our schools. 

Character and Manners. It is not right for a teacher to 
be indifferent to the moral conduct of his scholars. Some 
may think it none of their concern if their scholars do quar- 
rel, use profane language, and trespass on neighboring fields 
and orchards, but this is a wrong view to take of the subject. 
A good character in a child is of the first importance ; unless 
he possesses it, whatever intellectual attainments he may 
arrive at, his life will doubtless be fruitful of more evil than 
good. It is the duty of teachers to see, so far as they are 
able, that nothing inconsistent with strict morality transpires 
in or about the school house. To instruct children " to love 
the Lord their God with all their hearts," and " to do unto 
others as the}' would that others should do unto them," com- 
mends itself to all good people. 

Scholars should be taught good manners also. Ill maimers 
appear worse in an intelligent person than in one who is 
ignorant ; whereas virtue and affability often hide a good 
deal of ignorance, and make many friends. True politeness 
is a virtue and pleases everybody. 

Employing Teachers. The Local Committee occupy 
positions of much responsibility. It may sometimes be 
thought that it is of no very great consequence whom they 
engage, as the Examining Committee can reject the candidate 



if found incompetent; but the best way is to start right. 
When a good teacher is employed the success of the school 
may be considered almost certain. 

It is indispensable that a teacher be well acquainted with 
the branches he is expected to teach, for there is no object 
in sending a scholar to school unless he can learn something' 
after he gets there. He should have an excellent character, 
for we wish our children placed under correct influences. 
He should be a person of discretion, so that he may take no 
unjustifiable steps. He should be patient and amiable. If 
he is constantly finding fault, not satisfied with the perform- 
ances of his scholars when they do the best they can, they 
will lose their respect for him and not try to do anything. 
He must be of diligent habits as there is always work enough 
to do in the school room. 

A few dollars extra expense must not be taken into the 
account. A good school of six weeks is worth more than a 
decidedly bad one of any length. We should think more of 
the character of the school than of its length. What benefit 
can an incompetent teacher be to a school? The pay he 
receives is in part or wholly thrown away, and time, which 
ean never be recalled, runs to waste. Idleness and bad 
habits are engendered, and years may not obliterate their 
evil effects. 

Appropriation, By the additional appropriation of two 
hundred dollars to the sum granted last year, we have been 
able to maintain our schools the usual length. This addition 
has proved just about an offset for the increase of teachers' 
wji^es, and other expenses incident to our schools. Had it 
not been made, the educational interests of the town would 
not have hem properly cared for. We think the town may 
consider itself fortunate in having its school system carried 
on to the usual extent these times, at only an eighth 
additional expense. It is very certain this cannot be done 
the ensuing year, even with no more schools than at present. 
The more attention we pay to education, the better able we 
shall be to cancel the debt into which the war and other mis- 



6 

fortunes have plunged us. It seems as though so long a 
time ought not to elapse between the winter and spring 
terms, as is the case in some of the districts. It is also 
evident to all who are in any wise acquainted with the schools 
in the South and West Districts, that they each very much 
need an additional department. Sixty scholars crowded into 
one school room, under one teacher, is quite too many. In 
so large a school, consisting of pupils differing so much in 
their attainments, there must necessarily be a good many 
classes ; but a few minutes can therefore be devoted to each 
class, and the opportunities for instruction must be limited. 
We think, if these districts desire it and accommodations can 
be had to carry them on, the town should not hesitate to ap- 
propriate money to supply each of them with another school. 
If they are increasing in population the town can well afford 
to educate the children. 

School Houses. The town may not think it judicious just 
at present to engage in erecting new school houses, or re- 
modelling old ones ; but this is a subject that should claim 
our earnest attention at the earliest practicable time. To be 
sure a good school house is not everything ; a good teacher 
is of more importance. If a scholar is determined to excel, 
he will most likely do so whether he goes to school in ;t 
good or bad school house ; but we think, to make the place 
where our children pass so much of their time, healthy, com- 
modious and attractive, would give a new impulse to the 
cause of education, and be an honor to the town. 

District System. This town is fortunate in never having 
had the District System to contend with ; but now that the 
subject of new school houses is about to be considered, we 
find there are those who are in favor of it. We regret there 
are any disposed to advocate such a measure. So far as Ave 
are aware, this system has been fought against by all 
educators of note who have said anything upon the subject, 
for a long time. The Hon. Horace Manx, Hon. Barxus 
Sears, and the Hon. George S. Boutwell, as well as the 
present learned Secretary of the Board of Education, have 



7 

done all they could, for the last twenty-live years, to eradicate 
it from the state. One town after another has given it up, 
until it only remains here and there, and that to be deprecated. 
The idea of popular education is, to see that all the children 
have an equal opportunity of acquiring a common school 
education ; not that the children of the rich may enjoy it, 
and those of the poor go uncared for, or that a rich and pop- 
ulous district may erect an elegant school house, while a 
poor and thinly populated one may have only a miserable 
apology for one. In this matter it is hoped that the friends 
of education in all parts of the town will exercise a liberal 
spirit, rather than adopt a narrow or. sectional policy. 
Instead of now being the time to inaugurate the District 
System, it would be just the time to set it aside, if it existed. 
High School. We hope the town will soon regard it for its 
interest to raise money to sustain a High School a* part of the 
year. Until it does, we would recommend to those more 
particularly interested, to sustain one during the fall months 
for their individual benefit. The Selectmen have judiciously 
offered the lower room in the Town Hall for the purpose, 
and we hope another autumn may witness a High School in 
successful operation. Most certainly our more advanced 
scholars ought to have an opportunity to pursue branches of 
learning which cannot be sufficiently attended to in our com- 
mon schools. Several of our young ladies are now attending 
the Normal School in Framingham. We wish more might 
attend this or a similar institution. It would be an excellent 
thing for our teachers, so far as they are able, to attend 
Teachers' Institutes. Unless we do more for the cause of 
education in town, or send more of our scholars out of town 
to school, Acton cannot furnish her own teachers. Private 
schools are now going on in the South and West Districts. 
CENTRE DISTRICT.— Upi>er Department. 

Miss S. Augusta Davis, ) ™ , 
Mr. Luther Con ant, Jr., \ 

This school has had experienced teachers the past year. 
Miss Davis is a good scholar and gives practical instruction. 



8 

She had no large scholars, so that we could not look for that 
proficiency which we might otherwise expect. Her examina- 
tion, however, showed that she had been faithful and indus- 
trious. The classes, particularly in Reading and Intellectual 
Arithmetic, showed good improvement. The singing was 
pronounced by good judges to be very fine. 

Mr. Conant, who had taught this school several successive 
winters, consented to take it another winter. His reputation 
as a teacher, and his interest in the cause of education, are 
well understood. He is energetic and well qualified, and 
frequently labored with his scholars beyond the usual hours. 
At his examination, although the recitations were lengthy, so 
thorough had been his instructions, that but few questions 
were missed. A large class in Written Arithmetic per- 
formed all the examples put them. The compositions and 
rehearsals were good, and the singing, as at the close of the fall 
term, delightful. 

Primary Department. 

Miss Angenette AVheeler, Teacher. 

This school has been a successful one. No child, for whom 
nature has done anything, can grow up a dunce under Miss 
Wheeler's instruction. She is fertile in her expedients to 
make the children learn, and accomplishes her object. We 
think the parents have much reason to feel gratified at the 
appearance of their children at both her examinations. If 
these pupils continue to improve as they have commenced, 
many of them must make fine scholars. Their gymnastic 
exercises were useful and pleasant, and their recitations 
evinced an unusual understanding of what they had been 
over. 

AVEST DISTRICT.— Upper Department. 

Miss Elizabeth H. Lawrence, \ m 7 
-kit i> th --»*• c teachers. 

Mr. B. F. Martin, ) 

This is a very large, forward, and interesting school. The 
teacher has a vast amount of labor to perform, and it is only 
by pursuing her duties with steadiness and patience that she 
4 



9 

can satisfactorily succeed. In order to go through with all 
the recitations each day, but a few minutes can be allowed to 
each class. Miss Lawrence was extremely thorough in her 
instructions, and laborious in her efforts. Her examination 
was one of interest. The exercises in Reading and Mathe- 
matics showed that these branches had been thoroughly 
taught. We think the district fortunate in securing for the 
winter term Mr. Martin, of Tuft's College. He possesses 
talents well adapted to the school room, dispatching business 
with ease and celerity. The Reading, Writing and Drawing 
of Maps — indeed, the improvement in all the branches — 
showed that the school had been a busy one. The recitation 
of an extract from a discourse by Dr. Nott, and a compo- 
sition on Liberty, deserve to be noticed. Geometry, and 
several of the higher English branches, are pursued in this 
school. 

Primary Department. 
Miss Susan C. Huggins, Teacher. 
In a school composed of so many small scholars, the 
teacher needs to be calm and diligent. The exercise of an 
uneven disposition, or an indifferent feeling toward the 
school, would have a very bad effect. Miss Huggins is of 
gentle habits and always at work. There are a great many 
recitations to hear iii this school, if the children are small. 
We thought when we first visited it the classes read without 
much regard to sense or inflection, but at the last examina- 
tion we observed a marked improvement in this important 
branch ; also in spelling and defining words. The classes 
generally recited with promptness, and what is quite desir- 
able, spoke so that they could be understood. 

SOU'lTI DISTRICT.— Upper Department. 

Miss Jennie M. Harris, \ m 7 
tvt tvt n o \ Teachers. 

Mr. N. C. Scoville, ) 

The activity and experience of Miss Harris, combined 
with her other qualifications, render her well qualified to take 
charge of a large school. A person of a dull temperament 



10 

should never be found in such a place. She gives every 
class and every scholar a fair chance. Although she had 
more to do than should be required of any one teacher, yet 
she divided her efforts so judiciously that the improvement 
in all the branches was very evident. We found most of the 
school in Kobinson's Mental Arithmetic, which pleased your 
Committee very much. At the close of the fall term, the 
scholars manifested their attachment to her by the presenta- 
tion of a handsome gift. 

Mr. Scoville, the winter teacher, was a Cambridge 
student. Several large boys were dissatisfied with some of 
his arrangements the first of the term ; farther than this, 
both parents and scholars were well pleased with him. He 
had several good classes in Reading and Geography, and 
some fine scholars in Arithmetic ; a number pursued Algebra. 

Primary Department. 

Miss Martha M. Wetherbee, \ 

Miss Lottie C. Faulkner, > Teachers. 

Mrs. Eliza O. Daniels, ) 

This school has had a new teacher each term. Miss 
Wetherbee taught the spring term. She was devoted to 
her business, beloved by her pupils, and respected by the 
district. Much to our regret, during the succeeding 
vacation, she was seized with a violent illness, of which she 
has recently died, mourned by scholars and friends. 

The district was very fortunate in being able to procure 
Miss Faulkner as her successor. She had taught the 
school many successive terms, and was therefore able to com- 
mence where Miss Wetherbee left off. She is an excellent 
teacher, always contriving something new to interest the 
children. She infuses an active spirit into her pupils, and 
makes them understand their lessons. Her examination was 
an* interesting occasion, every class answering promptly and 
appearing well. Among the Declamations was one in which 
the echo was imitated in a charming manner. 

Miss Faulkner declining to teach the winter term, was 
succeeded by Mrs. Daniels. She taught the elementary 



11 

principles faithfully. This is the kind of teaching primary 
schools require. Punctuation was considered a subject of 
importance, and Orthography was practically taught. 
SOUTH EAST DISTRICT. 
Miss Nellie J. Fletcher, ) T 7 
Mr. Edward F. Richardson, ] Ieac,wrs - 
We thought when we first visited this school in the spring, 
that the scholars seemed to possess hut a limited knowledge 
of their books ; but, as we afterwards visited it from time to 
time, we found it assuming a more encouraging aspect. The 
discipline of the school was good. The scholars seemed 
attached to their teacher, and advanced step by step until the 
close of the fall term, when the improvement became very 
evident. 

Under the instruction of Mr. Richardson, a well-known 
and successful teacher, the school continued to make progress 
during the winter term. The classes at examination recited 
very well in Intellectual and Written Arithmetic, and 
showed a decided improvement in Reading and Writing. 
We think as much has been accomplished during the year as. 
could reasonably be expected. 

EAST DISTRICT. 
Miss Amelia D. Comstock, Teacher. 
Whenever we visited this school we found the scholars 
respectful and well behaved. During their recitations, 
whether the questions were put by the teacher or the Com- 
mittee, they usually gave good attention. We always found 
the teacher industrious, and interested in. the prosperity of 
the school. She evidently made considerable use of the 
blackboard in the Mathematics and Geography. The scholars 
were able to put fine maps upon the board. At her exam- 
inations some very good problems were wrought in Arith- 
metic and Algebra. We think the school advanced 
considerably during the year. 

NORTH DISTRICT. 
Miss Emilie W. Loker, \ 
Miss Lucy Flagg, > Teachers. 

Miss L. A. McCutchins, j 
The summer term was taught by Miss Loker. The 



12 

school was small, and the children for the most part young, 
so that we could not reasonably look for great attainments. 
The teacher, however, was faithful and industrious, and the 
school advanced under her instructions. 

The winter term was commenced by Miss Flagg. When 
engaged she was well known to be a person of superior 
education, and an unusually successful teacher. After teach- 
ing one month an opportunity presented itself, and being 
prompted by a sense of duty, she left for a more extensive 
field of usefulness among the contrabands in Washington. 

She was succeeded in her office by Miss McCutchins, 
also a fine scholar. She won the affections of her pupils and 
the admiration of the district, and did much to elevate the 
school. At her examination it was evident that she had 
performed a good deal of labor, and enjoyed the co-operation 
of her scholars. The singing was fine, and a rehearsal, in 
which the loyal states w r ere represented, was especially 
pleasing and attractive. 

SCHOOL CHILDREN AND APPROPRIATION. 

The number of children in town between the ages of five 
and fifteen, as ascertained on the first day of May last by the 
Assessors, was 378. 

Appropriation for the support of schools, 1864-5, $1,700 00 
Appropriation from State School Fund, 83 72 



Total amount, $1,783 72 

Sum appropriated by the town for each scholar 

between the ages of five and fifteen, $4 49 

Respectfully, in behalf of the School Committee, 

William W. Davis, Chairman, 
Centre District, William W. Davis, 
West " George C. Wright, 

South " J. E. Harris, 
So. East " Daniel Fletcher, 
East " Joseph Easterbrook, 

North " Isaac Flagg, 

School Committee. 



FINANCIAL 



Centre School. 
Appropriation, $377 04 

Balance from last year, 21 44 



Amount of teacher's wages, 

Paid for fuef, 

Incidentals, 

Balance to new account, 

$398 48 

March 18, 1865. Wm. W. Davis, Committee. 



$346 


75 


24 


87 


6 


62 


20 


24 



$398 48 



West School. 
Appropriation, $377 04 

Deficiency of last year, 7 45 



Amount of teacher's wages, $335 50 

Pnid for fuel and incidentals, 37 00 



$369 59 



$372 50 



Deficiency this year, 2 91 

March 18, 1865. George C. Wright, Committee. 



South School. 
Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 
Received of Frank Brown, 

Amount of teacher's wages, 
Paid for fuel, 
Incidentals, 

Deficiency this year, 

March 18, 1865, J. E. Harris, Committee. 



$377 04 

10 98 

5 10 


$393 

$396 
3 


12 


$361 72 

25 37 

9 14 


23 




11 



14 



South East School. 

Appropriation, $224 19 

Balance from last year, 12 80 

Amount of teacher's wages, 
Paid for fuel and incidentals, 
Balance to next account, 

$236 99 

March 18, 1865. Daniel Fletcher, Committee. 



6210 00 

24 99 

2 00 



$236 99 



East School. 

Appropriation, $224 19 

Amount of teacher's wages, $180 00 

Wood and incidentals, 14 25 

Balance to new account, 29 94. 

6224 19 

March 18, 1865. Joseph Easterbrook, Committee. 



North School. 

Appropriation, $224 19 

Balance from last year, 1 84 



Amount of teacher's wages, $201 50 

Paid for fuel, 14 00 

Incidentals, 7 26 

Balance to new account, 3 27 



$226 03 



$226 03 



March 18, 1865* Isaac T. Flagg, Committee. 



15 



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REPORTS OF 

THE SELECTMEN 



AND 



OTHER OFFICERS, 

OF T HK 

TOWN OF ACTON, 

FROM 

FEBRUARY 26th, 1865, TO FEBRUARY 26th, 1866, 

INCLUDING THE 

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES AND DEATHS IN 1865. 

ALSO, 

The Report of the School Committee. 



CONCORD : 

PRINTED BY BENJAMIN TOLMAN. 
1866. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



RECEIPTS. 

Amount received, $21,436 16 



EXPENDITURES. 



SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS 

Paid. 

O. W. Mead, for West School, 

J. E. Harris, for South School, 

W. W. Davis, for Centre School, 

John Fletcher, 2d, for South East School, 

Isaac T. Flagg, for North School, 

Joseph Estabrook, for East School, 



J. K. W. Wetherbee, for Centre Singing School, 
John Fletcher, Jr., for West Singing School, 



$531 08 




531 08 




381 09 




226 58 




226 58 




226 58 






$2,122 99 




)0l, 


$150 00 




150 00 



$2,422 99 



REPAIRS ON SCHOOL HOUSES. 
Paid. 

J. E. Harris, repairs on South School House, $46 89 
O. W. Mead, repairs on West School House, 48 06 
W. W. Davis, repairs on Centre School House, 21 22 
Joseph Estabrook, repairs on East School Ho., 26 85 
For furniture and fitting up school rooms at 

South and West school districts, 559 03 

For fencing around East School House, 18 00 



$720 05 



BOOKS AND PRINTING 

Paid. 

For printing Selectmen's Report, 

printing pamphlet do., 

printing warrants, 

tax books, 

books for military record, 

school books, 



$11 00 


71 


50 


8 


50 


2 


25 


7 


67 


47 


71 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

Paid. 

T. W. Hammond, for breaking roads, $13 33 

Charles Wheeler, " " 1 62 

Joel F. Hayward, " " 4 76 

William H. Teel, " " 12 50 

John Conant, " " 4 00 

Antoin Bulette, " " 10 83 

Daniel H. Wetherbee, labor on highway, 11 33 

Albert Moulton, laying wall, 33 88 

Francis Kingsley, building sluice, 4 00 

Abraham H. Jones, repairing sluice, 10 00 

Luther Conant, Jr., labor on highway, 12 75 

Simon Tuttle, " " 17 00 

Daniel Tuttle, " u 3 58 
Fletcher and Tarbell, rep. on powder mill bridge, 5 35 



$148 63 



$144 93 



DISCOUNT AND ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

Paid. 

John E. Cutter, discount on taxes, $624 34 

" " abatement of taxes, 115 74 







,S AND FAM 

$1,086 69 
42 50 
80 00 
30 50 


«p«*±v v/o 


APPROPRIATIONS FOR S< 

Paid. 

For state aid, 

transportation of soldiers in 
soldiers' drill, May 1860, 

Mrs. Rebecca C. Wright, 


3LDIER 

1862, 


[ILIES. 

$1,239 69 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 

Paid. 

For support of Sarah B. Childs, 

" Winefred A. Hews, 
" William Murphy, 
" Geo. W. Robbins, at reform sch. 
medical assistance for Mary A. Law, 
one pair shoes for do., 
assisting travellers, 
Daniel H. Wetherbee, groceries for almshouse, 
Do., for labor, 
James E. Billings, journey to Boston, 



$14 00 


19 75 


2 48 


>h., 37 00 


10 00 


2 50 


3 55 


3, 50 00 


80 92 


3 00 



$223 20 



NOTES AND INTEREST. 



Paid. 

Jonas K. Putney, note and interest, 

John Wood, " 

Silas P. Blodget, " 

Elbridge J. Robbins, 

David M. Handley, " 

Daniel Wetherbee, " 

Matthew M. Kenney, 

Ebenezer Conant, interest, 

Augustine Conant, " 

Frederick Rouillard, " 

James Keyes, " 

Joel Hanscom, " 

Daniel Harris, " 

John R. Whitcomb, " 

Calvin Harris, " 

James A. Billings, " 

Isaac T. Flagg, " 

John E. Cutter, " 



iterest, 


$1,143 01 


a 


552 50 


u 


167 71 


u 


534 85 


a 


214 70 


u 


1,562 50 


u 


119 25 




195 00 




360 00 




90 00 




€0 00 




40 80 




48 32 




30 00 




12 00 




12 00 




6 00 




3 69 







$5,152 33 



TOWN OFFICERS, 

Paid- 

William W. Davis, for examining teachers, 

superintending schools and making report, 
William D. Tuttle, for taking inventory and 

making taxes, 
Do., for copying taxes, 
Do., distributing tax books, 
Do., collecting and recording 32 births, 



$G0 00 



31 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 





40 



6 



William D. Tuttle, recording 12 marriages, 
Do., recording 36 deaths, 
Do., services as town clerk and making report, 
Samuel Hosmer, taking inventory and making 

taxes, 
John E. Cutter, for collecting taxes for 1864, 
James E. Billings, for services as selectman, 
Jonas K. Putney, u " 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, u " 



1 


20 


5 


60 


•t, 20 00 


25 


00 


100 


00 


37 


50 


11 


75 


25 


00 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 
Paid. 
For coal for town hall, 

wagon for town farm, 

express, postage and stationery, 
John E. Cutter, for revenue stamps, 
Do., summoning fourteen persons to take oath, 
Do., getting advice of George M. Brooks, 
Do., getting dogs licensed, 
Do., teaming coal for town hall, 
Ivory Keyes, for two stone posts and teaming, 
N. S. Faulkner, tolling bell for eight deaths, 
Hiram J. Hapgood, " six " 

Quincy A. Fletcher, " fifteen " 

George H. Harris, for taking care of town clock, 
Do., for fifteen gallons oil, 
Do., two lamp chimneys, 
Do., repairing armory, 
Do., washing floors, 
Do., one register, 
Do., one dozen lamp wicks, 
Do., one door bolt, 
Do., one tub, 
Do., repairing lock, 
Do., varnishing doors, 
Do., opening town hall forty-two times, 
Fletcher & Tarbell, for attending twenty-six funerals, 
Do., returning thirty-five deaths, 



$327 45 



$16 06 


54 00 


6 82 


3 65 


1 75 


2 00 


2 00 


1 50 


5 00 


1 60 


1 20 


3 00 


25 00 


15 40 


24 


25 


3 50 


9 00 


50 


13 


25 


25 


50 


37 00 


52 00 


3 50 



$246 10 



CEMETERY EXPENSES, 
Paid. 

Samuel Hosmer, for labor at east cemetery, 9 63 

Do., for stakes, 75 

Do., stone posts, gate irons and hanging gate, 9 50 



William D. Tuttle, for labor, 

Horace Tuttle, drawing stone, 

Daniel H. Wetherbee, for labor, 

Martin Pike, " 

John Cohollon, " 

Daniel McCarthy, " 

Daniel Fletcher, for laying wall, 

John Harris, for mowing brush in north cemetery, 

Charles Hastings, for labor at west cemetery, 

Do., land for west cemetery, 

William D. Tuttle, for surveying west cemetery, 

Do., printing deeds and circulars, 

Do., recording deeds, 

Fletcher & Tarbell, for gate at east cemetery, 



13 


83 


61 


00 


10 


25 


6 


00 


12 


12 


6 


50 


36 


15 


10 


50 


45 


00 


107 


58 


3 


00 


3 


00 




75 


5 


00 



$340 56 



CONDITION OF THE TREASURY FEB. 26, 1866. 



Receipts. 




Balance in treasury, Feb. 26, 1865, 


$3,030 64 


State tax for 1865, 


4,324 00 


County tax for 1865, 


667 13 


Town grant for 1865, 


6,000 00 


Town grant for schools, 


2,000 00 


Overlay on taxes, 


58 41 


Corporation tax, 


290 35 


State aid, to Jan. 1, 1865, 


1,925 50 


Borrowed money, 


2,800 00 


State school fund, 


92 99 


Armory rent, 


95 19 


Use of town hall, 


121 95 


School money from town of Concord, 


20 00 


" " Sudbury, 


10 00 




-— - fliiljiOD 10 


Expenditures. 




For support of schools, 


$2,422 99 


repairs on school houses, 


720 05 


books and printing, 


148 63 


roads and bridges, 


144 93 


discount and abatement of taxes, 


740 08 


appropriation for soldiers and families, 


1,239 69 


support of poor, 


223 20 


notes and interest, 


5,152 33 



For town officers, 327 45 

miscellaneous expenses, 246 10 

cemetery expenses, 340 56 

state tax, 4,324 00 

county tax, 667 13 

$16,697 14 



Balance in treasury Feb. 26, 1866, $4,739 02 



FINANCIAL CONDITION OF THE TOWN, FEB. 26, 1866. 
Dr. 

To balance due, as per report, Feb. 26, 1866, $4,739 02 
amount due from state for aid furnished 
families of soldiers, 1,386 69 





- <fpu,i^o *± 


AMOUNT DUE ON NOTES. 


Cr. 




By cash of Daniel Harris, 

Frederic Rouillard, 


$517 70 
1771 34 


Joel Hanscom, 


700 40 


Augustine Conant, 
Ebenezer Conant, 


4,116 00 
3,769 00 


Silas P. Blodget, 
Isaac T. Flagg, 
James Keyes, 


1,251 48 
105 50 
623 00 


Calvin Harris, 


202 60 


James A. Billings, 
John R. Whitcombj 


202 60 
506 50 


David M. Handley, 
James E. Billings, 


1,745 90 
1,120 10 







Balance against the town Feb. 26, 1866, with* 
out including the balance due as per over- 
seers' report for 1866, $10,506 41 



AMOUNT OF STATE AID PAID EACH PERSON. 

Mrs. Margaret Moore, $144 00 

S. H. Wetherbee, 107 20 

Betsey Shehan, 96 00 

Betsey M. Sawyer, 72 00 

Maria Fisk, 72 00 

Mr. Thomas Kingsley, 67 12 



Mrs. Catherine M. C. Dwelley, 






56 


40 


Mary Hurley, 








52 


00 


Charlotte M. Pike 


5 






48 


00 


Anna Whitney, 








46 


40 


Johanna Colman, 








44 


15 


Julia F. Nelson, 








42 


00 


MeCann sisters, 








40 


00 


Mrs. Alice Brooks, 








34 


00 


Fannie Stevens, 








30 


00 


Martha Wayne, 








27 


00 


Lubey, 








25 


71 


Mr. Michael Powers, 








25 


71 


Mrs. Joanna Moulton, 








18 


00 


Elvira Young, 








13 


00 


Nathan Goss, 








26 


00 








«JpJL,vOU \ 




JAMES 


E. 


BILLINGS, 


\ Selectmen 




JONAS 


K. 


PUTNEY. 


» 


of 




J. K. W 


". WETHERBEE, 


) Acton. 



Acton, Feb. 26, 1866. 



REPORT OF THE 
RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



AT THE 



ALMSHOUSE, IN ACTON, 

For the Year Ending April 1st, 1866. 



ARTICLES ON HAND APRIL 1st, 1866. 

9 cows $540,00 ; 1 horse, 125,00, $665 00 

3 shotes, 48,75 ; 12 fowls, 7,44, 
375 lbs. pork, 75,00 ; 50 do. beef, 6,00, 

4 1-2 tons hay, 67,50 ; 10 bush, rye, 10,00, 
17 bush, corn, 17,00 ; 11 do. oats, 6,60, 
50 do. potatoes, 30,00 ; 100 lbs. ham, 20,00, 
6 lbs. butter, 3,12 ; 30 do. lard, 6,60, 
1-2 bbl. flour, 6,12 ; 2 lbs. tea, 2,50, 
3 lbs. coffee, .36 ; 15 lbs. candles, 2,40, 
1-2 bbl. soap, 3,00 ; 1-2 do. pickles, 1,00, 
1 bush, beans, 3,00 ; 2 galls, molasses, 1,46, 

1 bush, rye meal, 1,00 ; 2 do. Indian meal, 2,00, 
skewer timber, 2,00 ; 15 bush, ashes, 2,50, 

2 lbs. sugar, 

$990 09 



RECEIPTS. 

For oxen, $488,00 ; milk, 427,18, 
horse, 150,00 ; skewers, 75,80, 
calves, 23,15 ; beef, 33,25, 
peaches, 23,83 ; apples, 12,40, 
potatoes, 3,50 ; eggs, 4,63, 
squashes, 1,32 ; hide, 5,04, 
drag plank, 1,50 ; keeping pedlar, 1,00, 
straw, 10,45 ; work at cemetery, 15,00, 



56 


19 


81 


00 


77 50 


23 


60 


50 


00 


9 


12 


8 


62 


2 


76 


4 


00 


4 


46 


3 


00 


4 


50 




34 



$915 18 


225 


80 


56 


40 


36 


23 


8 


13 


6 


36 


2 


50 


25 45 



$1,276 05 



11 



EXPENDITURES. 

For flour, $50,75 ; butter, 85,44, $136 19 

molasses, 37,68 ; sugar, 19,18 ; tea, 11,04, 67 90 

coffee, 10,82 ; meat, 96,13 ; fish, 20,15, 127 10 

meal, 53,32 ; cheese, 19,63 ; bread, 3,03, 75 98 

shorts, 28,49 ; oil meal, 4,20, 32 69 

cloth and clothing, 60,06 ; shoes, 13,39, 73 45 

tools, 14,03 ; nails, 2,53 ; oil, 4,81, 21 37 

corn, 7,60 ; vinegar, 2,50 ; spices, 5,28, 15 38 

cream tartar, 1,78 ; yeast, .56 ; saleratus, .12, 2 46 

matches, .65 ; solder, .57 ; rosin, .42 ; whips, .20, 1 84 

potash, 2,64; soap, 2,04; brooms, 1,35, 6 03 

rope, .30 ; wicking, .57 ; onions, 4,50, 5 37 

camphor, .48 ; beans, 7,75 ; plaster, 7,02. 15 25 

tallow, 2,80; medicines, 1,84; bone dust, 1,32, 5 96 

lime, .25 ; salt, 3,55 ; soda, .73 ; starch, .30, 4 83 

raisins, .86 ; seeds, .50 ; rice, .56 ; tobacco, 11,65, 13 57 

milk, .14 ; tin ware, .35 ; stove polish, .25 ; ink, .10, 84 

candles, .10 ; earthen ware, 3,27 ; stationery, .25, 3 62 

lead pipe, 9,72 ; plow points, .55 ; apples, .25, 10 52 

salt petre, .22 ; wheel grease, .25 ; barrels, 1,65, 2 12 

blacksmith's bill, 15,40 ; pasturing oxen, 19,85, 35 25 

skewer timber, 4,82 ; sawing lumber, .27, 5 09 

newspaper, 2,50 ; doctor's bill, 3,00 ; shotes, 15,00, 20 50 

use of bull, 2,25 ; use of winnowing mill, .50, 2 75 

weighing oxen, .12 ; expenses to Boston, 7,69, 7 81 

expenses on well, 8,13 ; cash to paupers, 3,00, 11 13 

oxen, 190,00; horse, 146,00; cow, 50,75, 386 75 

horse cart, 25,00 ; wagon, 54,00, 79 00 

cart harness, 4 00 

services of Mr. and Mrs. D. H. Wetherbee, 300 00 

James E. Billings' services, 6 00 

Jonas K. Putney's " 6 00 

J. K. W. Wetherbee's " 6 00 



$1,492 75 
Amount of inventory, April 1, 1865, $1,033 67 

Interest on farm, 239 40 

_ $1,273 07 



$2,765 82 



RECAPITULATION. 

Amount of expenditures, $1,492 75 

Amount of receipts, $1,276 05 

Cash from town treasury to balance account, 216 70 

$1,492 75 



12 



Total amount of expenditures, $1,492 75 

Amount of inventory, April 1, 1865 T 1,033 67 

Interest on farm, 239 40 



Total amount of receipts, $1,276 05 

Amount of inventory, April 1, 1866, 990 09 



$2,765 82 
$2,266 14 



$499 68 
Expense of victualling foreigners, 9 50 



Total amount of supporting poor at almshouse, $490 18 

Whole number of persons (exclusive of foreigners) supported 
in the Almshouse, 5 ; average number, 3 1-2 ; cost per week, 

$2,69. 



James E. Billings, } Overseers 

Jonas K. Putney, 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, 



*s, } Overseei 
\ of 

1RBEE, ) Poor. 



Acton, April 1, 1866. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



BIRTHS REGISTERED IN ACTON, IN 1865. 

No. Date of Birth. Name of Child and Parents' Names. 

1. Jan. 1, Charles Brooks, son of Heniy and Harriet E. Brooks, 

2. Jan. 6, William Charles Conghlin, son of John and Margaret 

Coughlin. 

3. Jan. 27, Elmer Rouillard, son of Frederick and Sarah RouiL- 

lard. 
—••4. Jan. 31, Minnie Sophia Harris, daughter of Francis E. and 
Mandana S. Harris. 

5. Feb. 11, Nelson Augustus Cobleigh, son of Ephraim and Har- 

riet E. Cobleigh. 

6. Feb. 15, Etta May Sawyer, daughter of Henry L. and Lucy 

A. Sawyer. 

7. Feb. 28, Nellie Maria Frost, daughter of George H. and Su- 

san M. Frost. 

8. April 18, Fannie Marcella Houghton, daughter of John R. 

and Martha E. Houghton. 

9. April 20, Adelaide Louise Richardson, daughter of Osman D. 

and Mary E. Richardson. 

10. May 7, Daniel Reddin, son of Patrick and Hannah Redclin. 

11. May 20, Ana Sophia Jones, daughter of Elnathan, Jr., and 

Elizabeth Jones. 

12. June 13, Florence Idella Noyes, daughter of Joseph and Dolly 

M. Noyes. 

13. June 15, Agnes Wormsley Garnmell, daughter of Robert and 

Agnes Gammell. 

14. July 1, Jennie Louise Colman, daughter of George W. and 

Louise M. Colman. 

15. July 13, Warren Henry Jones, son of James F. and Elizabeth 

Jones. 

16. July 13, Fred Lyman Farrar, son of Henry and Lydia A. 

Farrar. 

17. Aug. 23, Warren Edson Taylor, son of Thomas and Martha 

A. Taylor. 

18. Aug. 23, Mary Ellen Haggerty, daughter of William and 

Catherine Haggerty. 
. 19. Aug. 26, A daughter, to Nathaniel Y. Trickey. 

20. Sept. 4, Susan Elizabeth Billings, daughter of Luther and 

Martha A. Billings. 

21. Sept. 13, Edward Malloy, son of Thomas and Fannie Malloy. 

22. Sept. 17, Arlon U. Jackson, son of Loring M. and Harriet S. 

Jackson. 



14 



23. Sept. 18, Carrie Bell Hay ward, daughter of Cyrus and Mary 

P. Hay ward. 

24. Sept. 22, A son, to Luther, Jr. and Celeste J. Conant. 

Zo. Sept. 30, Ida Lilian Reed, daughter of Isaac and Sarah Jane 
Reed. 

26. Oct. 18, Delmon Gustavus Barker, son of Henry and Louisa 

M. Barker. 

27. Oct. 31, Mary Josephine Hannon, daughter of Michael and 

Mary A. Hannon. 

28. Nov. 1, Luke Harris Tuttle, son of Luke and S. Sophia Tut- 

tle. 

29. Nov. 15, Herbert Arnold Hapgood, son of Andrew and Eliza 

A. Hapgood. 

30. Nov. 18, Edwin Barker Hoar, son of John S. and Lydia P. 

Hoar. 

31. Nov. 23, Rockwood Miles, son of Warren and Maria J. Miles. 

32. Dec. 3, Katie Haggerty, daughter of William, 2d, and Mary 

Haggerty. 
Males, 16 ; females, 16. 



MARRIAGES REGISTERED IN THE TOWN OF ACTON, 

IN 1865. 

No. Date of Marriage. Names of the Parties. 

1. April 9, Mr. L. V. N. Peck, of Acworth, N. H., and Miss 

Mary Jane Harris, of Acton. 

2. May 14, Mr. William A. Walker, of Sudbury, and Miss Emma 

Louisa Merritt, of Acton. 

3. May 25, Mr. George W. Davis and Miss Mary Jane Bur- 

roughs, both of Acton. 

4. June 10, Mr. Samuel Oscar Lamcer and Miss Mary Frank 

Mann, both of Marlborough. 

5. Sept. 3, Mr. David Calahan and Miss Ellen Calhyne, both of 

Acton. 

6. Sept. 5, Mr. James E. Weston and Miss Ellen C. Hubbard, 

both of Acton. 

7. Sept. 14, Mr. Henry Hanson, of West Cambridge, and Miss 

Elizabeth Hay ward, of Acton. 

8. Oct. 5, Mr. John Wayne, of Acton, and Miss Maggie Seelye, 

of Boston. 

9. Oct. 22, Mr. Henry J. Rowe, of Candia, N. H., and Miss 

Lizzie S. Richardson, of Acton. 
10. Nov. 26, Mr. Sanford Wheeler, of Acton, and Miss Susan E. 
Guptill, of North Berwick, Me. 



15 



11. Dec. 7, Mr. Nathaniel H. Penniman and Miss Eliza A. Rich- 

ardson, both of Acton. 

12. Dec. 7, Mr. William B. Davis, of Acton, and Miss S. Maria 

Dwight, of North Wrentham. 

13. Dec. 24, Mr. Benjamin F. Flint and Mrs. Sarah Jane Phillips, 

both of Acton. 



DEATHS IN ACTON, IN 1865. 

No. Date of Death. Name and Age. 

1. Jan. 7, Mr. Zoheth Taylor, aged 37 yrs. 

2. Jan. 17, Winifred H. Hewes, aged 29 yrs. 

3. Jan. 23, Milton F., son of Thomas and Martha A. Taylor, 

aged 3 yrs. 10 mos. 22 days. 

4. Jan. 31, Mr. Silas Sweatt, aged 80 yrs. 

5. Feb. 3, Mrs. Margaret C, wife of Mr. James Todd, aged 23 

yrs. 8 mos. 10 days. 

6. March 22, Dr. John M. Miles, aged 63 yrs. 5 mos. 

7. March 26, Edmund F. Hannon, son of Michael and Mary A. 

Hannon, aged 5 yrs. 11 mos. 18 days. 

8. April 10, Widow Charlotte H„ Davis, aged 60 yrs. 8 days. 

9. April 30, Mrs. Eunice Wilbur, aged 75 yrs. 1 mo. 20 clays. 

10. May 18, Mrs. Susan B. Davis, wife of Mr. Ebenezer Davis, 

aged 62 yrs. 

11. June 16, Miss Lucy Barnard, aged 37 yrs. 

12. June 17, Mrs. Harriet Handley, wife of Mr. Aaron C. 

Handley, aged 39 yrs. 8 mos. 9 days. 

13. June 19, Carrie Etta Handley, daughter of Aaron C. and Har- 

riet Handley, aged 4 yrs. 5 mos. 10 days. 

14. July 19, Mrs. Lydia Jane Wild, wife of Mr. William A. Wild, 

aged 37 yrs. 4 mos. 

15. Aug. 3, Mr. George W. Bobbins, aged 84 yrs. 6 mos. 

16. Aug. 17, Mrs. Rebecca Billings, aged 84 yrs. 11 mos. 

17. Aug. 17, Mrs. Caroline E. Wyman, wife of Mr. O. C. Wy- 

man, aged 37 yrs. 8 mos. 22 days. 

18. Aug. 22, Frank C. Wright, son of George C. and Susan H. 

Wright, aged 1 yr. 9 mos. 9 days. 

19. Sept. 7, Mr. Charles Robbins, aged 79 yrs. 10 mos. 

20. Sept. 15, Mrs. Sally Haynes, aged 84 yrs. 6 mos. 

21. Sept. 20, Widow Esther Barker, aged 82 yrs. 2 mos. 5 days. 

22. Sept. 29, Mrs. Anna E. Robbins, wife of Mr. Luke J. Rob- 

bins, aged 27 yrs. 3 mos. 27 days. 

23. Sept. 30, Mrs. Mary Robbins, aged 75 -yrs. 4 mos. 9 days. 

24. Oct. 2. Widow Sarah W. Noyes, aged 80 3<rs. 8 mos. 

25. Oct. 3, John, son of Patrick and Bridget Gallaghar, aged 1 

yr. 9 mos. 



16 

26. Oct. 5, Mrs. Lucy Mead, aged 64 yrs. 2 mos. 9 days. 

27. Oct. 6, Francis, son of Patrick and Bridget Gallaghar, aged 5 

yrs. 6 mos. 

28. Oct. 8, Mary Ellen Kelley, daughter of Joseph and Ellen Kel- 

ley, aged 7 yrs. 8 mos. 18 days. 

29. Oct. 11, Mrs. Joanna Lynch, wife of Peter Lynch, aged 36 yrs. 

30. Oct. 10, Mrs. Elizabeth Jane Murphy, wife of Mr. Daniel 

Murphy, aged 34 yrs. 

31. Oct. 17, Mrs. Celeste J. Conant, wife of Mr. Luther Conant, 

Jr., aged 32 yrs. 

32. Oct. 20, Miss Lucy M. Robbins, aged 35 yrs. 4 mos. 16 days. 

33. Oct. 25, Mr. John Powers, aged 38 yrs. 

34. Dec. 29, Widow Hannah Butterfield, aged 87 yrs. 

William D. Tuttle, Town Clerk. 
Acton, Feb. 26, 1866. 



REPORT OF CEMETERY COMMITTEE. 



EAST CEMETERY. 



Expenditures. 
For printing deeds and circulars, 


$9 00 


mowing brash, 


16 37 


raking and burning do., 


9 58 


stakes, and lotting up squares, 


6 38 


grading avenues, 


16 25 


completing wall and putting up gate, 


67 15 


Receipts. 




For five lots deeded, 


$5 00 


wood sold, 


3 00 


Received of town, by order, 


116 73 



WEST CEMETERY. 
Expenditures. 
For laying out and grading avenues, mowing 



$124 73 



$124 73 



brush and setting bound stones, 
stakes for lots, and numbering, 
deeds and circulars, 
recording deed, 
record book, 
postage and envelopes, 


$52 18 

4 11 

9 00 

60 

75 
88 


$67 52 
$81 50 


Receipts* 
For thirty lots deeded, 

repairing lots, 

wood sold, 
Received from town, 


$30 00 

4 50 

2,00 

45 00 






Balance in Committee's hands, 

NORTH CEMETERY. 

Expenditures. 
For mowing and raking brush, 


$13 98 
$10 50 



18 

It will be seen, by an examination of the Report of the Select- 
men, that a very large part of the expenditures incurred for the 
Cemeteries were for the purchase of land for the West Cemetery, 
and for building the wall and gate for the Cemetery in the east 
part of the town. But a small sum has been expended for im- 
provements in the interior of the Cemetery grounds. In the East 
Cemetery the avenues have been nearly completed, and many lots 
have been staked out. In the West thirty lots have been deeded 
and sundry improvements commenced. What is now wanted is 
the co-operation of proprietors in dressing up their lots in a neat 
and tasteful manner, and we cordially invite and earnestly entreat 
all owners of lots, either in the new or old grounds, to begin the 
good work the coming season. We spend large sums in the erection 
of monuments, testifying of our love for friends departed. Shall 
we not see the surroundings of these made attractive ? We trust 
that it will soon be considered a moral, if not a religious duty, of 
every owner of a lot in our cemeteries to root out every brier and 
bush, as well as everything of an unornamental character, in his 
grounds. When this is done, and the town has completed the im- 
provements it has begun, we shall have cemeteries to which it will 
be pleasant to pay an occasional visit. 

And should proprietors of lots take earnest action in this mat- 
ter, we feel sure the town will not grudge a small, annual expendi- 
ture for their general improvement. 

Wm. D. Tuttle, } „ 
Samuel Hosmer I ^ eme ^ 
Charles Hastings,/ Oomwto*. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 






OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON, 



FOR THE 



SCHOOL YEAK, 1865-6. 



CONCORD : 

PRINTED BY BENJAMIN TOLMAN. 

1866. 



REPORT 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

The School Committee respectfully submit their annual 
report. 

It is a matter of deep interest to the town of Acton, 
whether or not the cause of education is well carried on. 
Other subjects may seem of more immediate importance, 
but, so far as its future prosperity or the happiness and use- 
fulness of the rising race is concerned, there is no greater 
interest to which it can attend. There is almost as much 
difference between an intelligent community and an ignorant 
one as there is between light and darkness. In the former 
we see thrift and enterprise, and everything to which the 
hand of industry and ingenuity is applied returning a rich 
reward, while, in the latter, a description of the customs, 
character and conditions of the people generations ago will 
substantially describe them at the present day. 

It is an honor to a town to raise up good scholars, and the 
number of such scholars will depend upon the interest felt 
by the citizens in the cause of education. It is not to be 
understood when we are making efforts to educate our youth, 
that they are the only ones that will be benefited, for not a 
few of them will settle in other towns and other states, and 
an intelligent mind will have an influence wherever it goes. 
If wise legislation is applied to the states recently in rebel- 
lion, their fine climate, fertile fields and great rivers will, 
doubtless, attract thither not only great numbers from 
Europe, but not a few from New England will establish 
themselves here and there throughout its rich and wide 
domains ; and it will make a great difference respecting the 
future condition of the Southern people whether or not these 
emigrants are intelligent and God-fearing men. The subject 



of education then is of national importance, and it may well 
be a source of satisfaction to feel that we are doing some- 
thing for the welfare of the whole country as well as for 
ourselves, when we are attending to the educational interests 
of the town. 

We have not yet the number of families in town which 
makes it imperative upon us to support a High School, yet 
such a school would be a splendid thing for this town. It is 
just what our young people need, and some of them very 
much desire. Your Committee believe such a school would 
be worth more than it would cost to sustain it, — that, after 
it became established, it would prove a source of emulation, 
attraction and wealth. The High School, taught in the 
centre of the town last fall, was considered by all as a very 
profitable one. We wish we might have such a school for 
the year round, until such time as the town shall regard it 
for its interest to support a similar one. 

State of the Schools. We think the prosperity of the 
schools, the past year, has been such as to afford encourage- 
ment to the friends of education in the town. Doubtless 
some of them might have been conducted in a more efficient 
manner, and many of the scholars might have better appre- 
ciated and improved their privileges. Although, with but 
one exception, taught by females, we have usually found a 
fair degree of discipline, and in most of the schools a com- 
mendable application to study. 

The Local Committee have evinced an increased interest 
in their respective schools, thus showing that they feel, more 
than ever, the responsibilities of their office, which is one of 
much importance. A great trust is committed to their 
hands. We think the teachers, without exception, have 
endeavored to exert a correct influence over the minds of 
their pupils. They have visited each other's schools to some 
extent. This is a good practice, for, however well we may 
think we understand our business, it is wise occasionally to 
observe how others manage who are engaged in a like 
occupation. We would call the attention of the town to the 



fact that the smaller districts have the advantage over the 
larger ones with respect to length of schools, but, as they 
have no money to spare, we would recommend a small 
additional appropriation for the village districts. 

We have occasion of gratitude to God for the general 
health the children of our schools have enjoyed the past year. 

Care of School Houses. The additional schools, put in 
operation in the South and West Districts, have proved 
highly satisfactory. It was somewhat expensive starting 
them, but it was money well expended. Nothing would 
induce the people of those districts to return to the old 
arrangement. These schools being established, it has been 
thought best to let the subject of new school houses rest a 
year or two. We would therefore recommend to the Local 
Committees, while the old school houses continue to be occu- 
pied, to keep them in comfortable repair. Let the doors 
and windows and all parts of the house be kept tight, with 
the exception of being well ventilated, so that the health of 
our children need not be jeopardized by sitting in a current 
of air. If the stove or chimney is out of order, let them be 
put in good condition if they can be ; if not, they should be 
removed and new ones put in their places. The grounds 
around the school houses should be kept looking respectable, 
and the teacher should be expected to see that the inside is 
as attractive as circumstances will admit. The young ladies 
should volunteer their services to assist in keeping the school 
room well swept. It is very unpleasant for the Committee, 
when they visit a school, to find the room covered with dirt. 
Many of our school rooms, however, are kept remarkably 
neat. 

Reading, A good deal of attention should be given to 
this subject. Probably time enough is bestowed upon it, 
but we believe better instruction in man}' cases might be 
given. A scholar who understands well what he reads can 
get along better with any other branch to which lie may 
attend. Children ought to be faithfully instructed in this 
branch while quite young. We have sometimes known 



6 

mothers to do a good deal towards making their children 
good readers, by reading to them, in a lively and interesting 
manner, such pleasant stories and dialogues as they can com- 
prehend, at the same time instructing them to read in a 
similar manner. 

We have, also, often observed that the children of those 
parents who have a good understanding of their mother 
tongue, and using it correctly in conversation, have, as a 
general rule, a much better command of language, and 
appear better in society than other children. We see then 
that the teachers in our primary schools should understand 
well the art of teaching children to read. But a knowledge, 
of this department is not to be learned from imitations 
merely ; the sense must be comprehended. They should there- 
fore strive to interest their pupils in the subject of the lessons, 
asking questions upon it, and frequently giving examples of 
the manner in which a sentence should be read ; and when 
the scholar comes across a word with which he is not 
familiar, he should be required to spell it out, pronouncing 
one syllable after another, giving a good pronunciation of 
the whole word at the end. Poor readers, as far as practi- 
cable, should be kept in classes corresponding to their 
requirements, and no class should hurry from one lesson or 
text book to another until it is qualified to do so. 

Committing short pieces to memory, is a good exercise for 
young children in this department. The spelling book and 
dictionary should be freely used in connection with this 
branch of education. 

Classification, There should be as few classes in school 
as possible, consistent with the attainments of the pupils. 
The less the number of classes, the more opportunity for 
instruction the pupils will enjoy. It is usually very difficult 
keeping a school classified according to our liking, as some 
of the scholars are, more or less, absent, and a portion of 
them attend school only a part of the year, while others 
attend constantly. There is also a great difference both in 
the capacity and inclination of children to acquire knowj^ 



edge. Some learn easy and others hard. Some love to 
study, while others have little taste for it. Some have a 
great partiality for a particular branch, while others care 
about the same for one study as another. These differences 
in the attendance and characteristics of children make it 
necessary, in our upper departments, to have a good many 
classes. Still we should bring as large a number as practi- 
cable together at a recitation. A large class can see and 
hear as well as a small one. 

In giving out a lesson, the most forward scholar should 
not be made a criterion, nor the most backward one, but the 
average abilities of the class should be considered. It is 
quite desirable to hear a recitation in each branch every day, 
but when they are so numerous that justice cannot, in good 
measure, be done them, it is better to hear them less frequently ; 
but regularity should be observed at any rate. We think if 
better scholarship was required before pupils were admitted 
to the upper departments, it might help this matter of classi- 
fication to some extent. Such an arrangement might also 
produce more of a spirit of emulation among the scholars. 

Teachers. No matter how good school houses we may 
build or how much money appropriate, unless we obtain 
good teachers, the cause of education will not flourish. It is 
right that we should expect a good deal of our teachers. 
The position they occupy should not be sought by those who 
are not willing to labor. To give out lessons and see that 
they are recited precisely according to the book, does not 
constitute even a decent teacher. She may be remarkable 
for her power to communicate and explain definitely the sub- 
juct of the lesson, and still not do the whole work. She 
must get the scholars' attention, put a good many questions, 
and ascertain whether the scholar understands or cares to 
understand the subject. Because a scholar can repeat a rule 
in Arithmetic, or a demonstration in Geometry, does not make 
that he understands it. Not only his memory but his reason- 
ing powers must be brought into exercise, and principles 
established in the mind. A free use of the blackboard is 
indispensable in giving instruction in the Mathematics. 



8 

There are many questions in Geography to which the 
scholars' attention should be called. Beginners in Grammar 
need to be attracted to that study by something more than 
the text book furnishes, else they may pursue it for several 
terms without much profit. Writing Compositions is a good 
exercise for older scholars in this department. A scholar 
may go through Philosophy, reciting so well from memory 
as apparently to have a perfect lesson every day, and yet, if 
he is not questioned upon the principles of that science, and 
an interest in it awakened in his mind, the time he has 
bestowed upon it is nearly lost. Memory may make super- 
ficial scholars, but it takes knowledge to make practical 
ones. 

What we should endeavor to secure, then, is laborious 
teachers, and those who are qualified to set before their 
pupils incentives to industry. 

CENTEE DISTEICT. — Upper Department. 

Miss Emma L. Stevens, 

" Emeline Jewell, 

" Angie Wheeler, 
Mr. James Fletcher, 

Miss Stevens taught the summer term. She was of 
pleasant manners, conscientious in her endeavors, and tried 
hard to keep a good school. 

The ensuing term was commenced by Miss Jewell, a 
teacher of experience,' and well qualified in all respects for 
her position. But, after teaching three weeks, it became 
necessary for her to relinquish her charge on account of 
sickness of friends. Her place was at once occupied by 
Miss Wheeler, whose good scholarship, fidelity to her work 
and love for her occupation, render her well qualified for the 
office of teacher. She carried the school through successfully. 
Good scholars made rapid progress, and dull ones improved 
under her instructions. 

Mr. Fletcher taught the winter term. The school was 
fortunate in having so able and industrious a teacher. It 
was admirably conducted. At its examination the first class 



>■ Teachers. 



in Mental Arithmetic, the class in Algebra, and several 
classes in Geography, attracted our attention. 

Primary Department. 

Miss Anna F. Blanchard, ) T } 
" S. Eldora Esterbrook, $ leacners ' 

This school has had inexperienced teachers the past year. 
It is pleasant to give some of our more advanced scholars, 
who desire to teach and appear to have the requisite qualifi- 
cations, an opportunity to try their hand at it. By doing so 
we shall be likely to find some, at least, who will become an 
honor to the office. 

Miss Blanchard taught the summer and fall terms. She 
was quite dignified among her pupils, — maintained a reason- 
able degree of order, kept her school room looking neatly, 
and, we believe, gave fair satisfaction to the district. 

Miss Esterbrook took charge of the winter school. She 
manifested much interest in her business, and displayed a 
good degree of activity. At her examination several of the 
classes recited very well, especially a class of beginners in 
Grammar. The recitations were well chosen and attractive. 

WEST DISTRICT.— Upper Department. 
Miss Nellie A. Brown, ) ™ , 

" LlBBIE A. MCCUTCHINS, £ leaCtierS ' 

This school deserves a high rank among the schools in 
town. There are some advanced scholars here. Geometry, 
Philosophy, and some other of the higher English branches 
receive attention to a considerable extent, and not, we think, 
to the detriment of the common ones. 

Miss Brown taught the summer and fall terms. She en- 
deavored to make her school a profitable one. 

Miss McCutchins had charge during the winter. She had 
previously taught in another part of the town with unusual 
success, and was no less successful here. The scholars 
seemed to appreciate their advantages, and pursued their 



10 

studies with much zeal. At the close of the examination the 
scholars presented the teacher with a splendid book. In the 
evening this school, together with the other departments, had 
a very successful exhibition. 

Intermediate Department. 

Miss Julia Ann Putnam, ) ™ , 
- Ellen C. Browne, $ leacfiers - 

The progress of this school during the year has been en- 
couraging. Miss Putnam had the management of it during 
the summer and fall terms. The scholars gave their atten- 
tion at their recitations, which were conducted in a faithful 
and profitable manner, and the school prospered under her 
instructions. 

She was succeeded by Miss Browne, who carried on the 
school during the winter term with equal success. There 
was a liveliness and interest in this school which it always 
gives your Committee pleasure to witness. The scholars 
excelled, considering their age, in Mental Arithmetic and 
Grammar. 

Primary Department. 

Mrs. Fannie A. Stevens, ^ 
Miss Addie T. Willard, > Teachers. 
" Mary S. Balou, ) 

Your Committee consider the primary schools of no less 
importance than the higher ones. They watch over them 
with equal solicitude. In science, as well as in what per- 
tains to character, children need the best of training. If 
they are not started right and do not get attached to their 
books while young, their success is doubtful. 

We think this school has made commendable progress 
during the year. Mrs. Stevens taught it during the summer. 
She was very industrious and the school improved under her 
care. 

Miss Willard had charge the ensuing term. She is well 
qualified to instruct children, presenting to their minds such 



11 

knowledge as they are qualified to understand. The hours 
of study were enlivened by useful and interesting exercises. 
At the examination the school showed good improvement, 
especially in Reading and Arithmetic. 

Miss Balou conducted the school during the winter. We 
were well pleased with the manner in which she carried it on. 
The scholars were well drilled in what they went over, 
thereby laying a good foundation for the future. The classes 
appeared very well at examination, and the pieces recited 
were well adapted to their years. 

SOUTH DISTRICT. — Upper Department. 

Miss Helenette Colby, > m 7 
» Clara H. Hapgood, \ ^chers. 

This school, during the summer and fall terms, was under 
the care of Miss Colby. She had before taught in the dis- 
trict, and had the confidence of both parents and scholars. 
She maintained a good degree of discipline with little exer- 
tion, and taught the school with success. At the close of 
the school the scholars manifested their good will by making 
her a valuable present. 

She commenced the winter term, but, being taken sick, 
her place was supplied by Miss Hapgoocl, a tine scholar and 
experienced teacher. At the examination the drawing of 
maps, repeating of rules and illustration of principles, made 
it evident to the Committee that the school had flourished 
under her management. 

IXTERMEDI ATE DEPARTS EXT. 

Miss Lottie C. Faulkner, Teacher* 

This has been a profitable school the past year. It is very 
well classified. This, doubtless, arises from having the same 
teacher so many successive terms. Securing Miss Faulkner 
as teacher, insures success. Her instruction is practical, 
which is the kind we want in these days, for we live in 
practical times. 



12 

At her examination the scholars would uniformly bear 
questioning in those rules which they had been over. They 
also spoke with much distinctness. Their recitations were 
judiciously selected, and their gymnastics performed in an 
amusing and skilful manner. 

Primary Department. 
Miss S. M. Davight, ) rp -, 

" J. S. CONANT, $ leaC " erS > 

Miss D wight taught this school during the summer and 
fall in a lively and efficient manner. Her discipline was 
good, and when her classes came out to recite, they gave 
their attention to her instructions as though they thought them 
of importance. The teacher who has the talent to get the 
attention of her pupils is pretty sure to be successful. The 
examination was very satisfactory, showing that the scholars 
had been minutely taught in the elementary principles, some 
pleasant exercises introduced, and instruction given with 
vigor and accuracy. 

Miss Conant taught during the winter. It was her first 
attempt, but after she got started she carried on the school 
successfully. She seems to possess the qualities of a good 
teacher. The classes appeared very well at examination, 
especially in Reading, which is a very important branch in 
this department, 

SOUTH EAST DISTRICT. 

Miss Nellie J. Fletcher, Teacher. 

This and the Intermediate Department in the South Dis- 
trict are the only ones that have gone through the year with- 
out a change of teachers. We wish there might be fewer 
changes in the future. The teacher who is acquainted with 
the character and attainments of her pupils has a very good 
start. Miss Fletcher has taught quite a number of terms 
here with satisfaction to the district. During the summer 
and fall terms there was an unusual number of scholars 



13 

neither absent nor tardy. Of the classes at the examination, 
we noticed one in Mental Arithmetic and the classes in 
Geography as being very good. Writing here received a 
good degree of attention. The closing exercise was unusu- 
ally appropriate. 

NORTH DISTRICT. 

Miss L. A. McCutchins, > rp 7 
" Amelia D. Comstock, 5 

Miss McCutchins taught this school last year with satisfac- 
tion to all. She continued to conduct it with much profit. 
The scholars seemed to appreciate their advantages, and 
assiduously pursued their studies. The result was a good 
school and an excellent examination. 

Miss Comstock took her place in the winter. The scholars 
continued to study with zeal, so that, at the close of the 
term, we could readily conclude that good advancement had 
been made, especially in Intellectual and Written Arithmetic. 

EAST DISTRICT. 

Miss Amelia D. Comstock, > ™ , 
« Fannie E. Brigham, \ Teachers. 

What we have before said of Miss Comstock's success in 
this school, as well as in the North District, may, with equal 
propriety, be said of her efforts here the present, year. She 
taught the summer and fall terms, and the school made 
progress under her care. 

Miss Brigham took charge the winter term. It was her 
first attempt at teaching, and therefore quite an undertaking 
for her, but we think she managed the school better than 
most young teachers would have done. Whenever we vis- 
ited the school we found her conducting the recitations in a 
satisfactory manner, calling the attention of the pupils to 
those particulars which the subjects naturally suggested. 
We were a good deal interested in the examination, especially 
in the classes in Intellectual Arithmetic, and in the other 
mental exercises. . At the close a beautiful book was present- 
ed the teacher in a handsome manner. 



14 

SCHOOL CHILDREN AND APPROPRIATION. 

The number of children in town between the ages of five 
and fifteen, as ascertained on the first day of May last by the 
Assessors, was 386. 

Appropriation for support of schools, 1865-66, $2,000 00 
Share of State School Fund, 92 99 

Received for scholars attending our schools from 

other towns, 30 00 



Sum total, $2,122 99 

Sum appropriated by the town for each scholar between 
the ages of five and fifteen inclusive, $5,18. 

Respectfully, in behalf of the School Committee. 

Wm. W. Davis, Chairman, 
Centre District, Wm. W. Davis, 



West " 


O. W. Mead, 


South 


J. E. Harris, 


South East 


John Fletcher, 


East " 


J. ESTERBROOK, 


North " 


Isaac Flagg, 




School Committee, 



FINANCIAL. 



CENTRE SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 

Amount of teachers' wages. 

Paid for fuel, 

Incidentals, 

Balance to new account, 

March 17, 1866. 



$381 09 
20 24 


$367 25 

17 89 

8 67 

7 52 



$401 33 



$401 33 



Wm. W. Davis, Committee. 



WEST £ 

Appropriation, 
Deficiency of last year, 


SCHOOL. 
0. W. 


$531 08 

L 1 80 


Amount of teachers' wages, 
Paid for fuel, 
Incidentals, 


$483 50 
39 00 
14 65 


Deficiency this year, 
March 17, 1866. 


MeAd, C 



$529 28 



$537 15 



SOUTH SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 
Deficiency last year, 



Amount of teachers' wages, 
Paid for fuel, 
Incidentals, 

March 17, 1866. 



$531 08 
3 11 


$466 35 
47 75 
13 87 



$527 97 



$527 97 



J. E. Harris, Committee. 



16 

SOUTH EAST SCHOOL. 

Appropriation, 
Balance from last } r ear, 

Amount of teachers' wages, 

Paid for fuel, 

Incidentals, 

Balance to new account, 

$228 58 

March 17, 1866. John Fletcher, Committee. 



$226 


58 


2 


00 


$174 50 


15 


00 


7 


15 


31 


93 



$228 58 



EAST SCHOOL. 

Appropriation, $226 58 

Balance from last year, 29 94 



Amount of teachers' wages, $200 00 

Wood and incidentals, 32 68 

Balance to new account, 23 84 



$256 52 



$256 52 



March 17, 1866. Joseph Esterbrook, Committee. 



NORTH SCHOOL. 

Appropriation, $226 58 

Balance from last year, 3 27 



Amount of teachers' wages, $205 00 

Paid for fuel, 16 00 

Incidentals, 3 82 

Balance to new account, 5 03 



$229 85 



$229 85 



March 17, 1866. Isaac Flagg, Committee. 



17 



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ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



SELECTMEN AND OTHER OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON, 

FROM 

FEBRUARY 26, 1866, TO FEBRUARY 26, 1867, 

, INCLUDING THE 

MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS IN 1866. 

ALSO, THE 

Eeport of the School-Committee, 



CONCORD : 
PRINTED BY BENJAMIN TOLMAN. 

1867. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



RECEIPTS. 



Amount received, 



$16,266 76 



EXPENDITURES. 



SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 
Paid. 

O. W. Mead, for West School, 

J. E. Harris, for South do., 

W. W. Davis, for Centre do., 

John Fletcher, 2nd, for South East do., 

Isaac T. Flagg, for North do., 

Calvin Harris, for East do., 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, for South Singing School, 



$611 


00 






611 


00 






427 


70 






244 


40 






244 


40 






244 


40 


$2,382 


90 








1, 




150 


00 



REPAIRS ON SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

Paid. 

J. E. Harris, for repairs on South Sch. House, $71 23 

Calvin Harris, do. do. East do., 6 25 

Isaac T. Flagg, do. do. North do., 3 36 

Wm. W. Davis, do. do. Centre do., 9 05 

John Fletcher, 2nd, do. do. South East do., 4 35 



BOOKS AND PRINTING. 

Paid. 

For printing Selectmen's report, $12 50 



" " pamphlet reports, 


94 35 


" " town warrants, 


8 50 


" Collector's book, 


1 12 


" tax books, 


87 


" record books, 


50 


u books and maps, for schools, 


26 98 



$2,532 90 



$94 24 



$144 82 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

Paid. 

John Chaffin, for breaking roads 625 hours, 

J. W. Livermore, do. do. 94 hours, 

John F. Blood, do. do. 66 1-2 do., 

Luther R. Forbush, do. do. 127 do., 

James W. Wheeler, do. do. 340 3-4 do., 

E. F. Fuller, do. do. 191 do., 

A. H. Jones, do. do. 265 do., 

Silas Conant, Jr., do. do. 222 -do., 

Simon Hosmer, do. do. 154 do., 

Samuel Hosmer, do. do. 72 1-4 do., 

Orlando Leland, do. do. 315 do., 

Thomas P. Sawyer, do. do. 229 do., 

Daniel Tuttle, do. do., 

Elias Hajrnes, do. do. 142 do., 

Moses Taylor, do. do., 

Calvin Harris,* do. do. 96 do., 

Jonas K. Putney, for lumber and labor on 

bridge near Cash's Mills, 
Francis Kinsley, for building sluice on the 

road near the house of Jas. W. Wheeler, 
Do., for repairing sluice in West Acton, 
John Harris, for repairing bridge on Lowell 

road, 
Do., for one guide post, 
J. R. Bassett, for land damage in building 

road, 
Cyrus Fletcher, for railing two bridges near 

William Schouler's, 
Do., for repairs on Powder Mill Bridge, 
John Fletcher, 2d, do. do., 
Samuel Hosmer, for repairing road near the 

house of Aaron Chaffin, 
Daniel Tuttle, for work on highway, 



$104 


17 


15 


67 


11 


08 


21 


17 


56 


79 


31 


83 


44 


17 


37 00 


25 


68 


12 


04 


52 


50 


38 


16 


27 


60 


23 


66 


14 


71 


16 


00 


$3 26 


50 


00 


2 


00 


4 


60 


6 


00 


50 


00 


28 


12 


9 


92 


7 


00 


3 


75 


1 


78 



$532 23 



$166 43 
$698 66 



DISCOUNT AND ABATEMENT ON TAXES. 

Paid. 

John E. Cutter, abatement on taxes, $30 63 

Francis Dwight, discount on taxes, 407 00 



$437 63 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR SOLDIERS AND FAMILIES. 



State Aid. 


Paid. 




Hiram W. Wetherbee, 


$140 00 


Rebecca C. Wright, 


112 00 


Hattie W. Wilder, 


112 00 


Rebecca Bigelovv, 


112 00 


Daniel L. Veazey, 


84 00 


William F. B. Whitney, 


109 00 


Alson R. Sumner, 


84 00 


Luke Smith, 


84 00 


John S. Hoar, 


84 00 


Maria Kinsley, 


56 00 


Eliza Conant, 


56 00 


Johanna Colman, 


52 00 


Paul Hay ward, 


51 00 


Gilbert G. Stevens, 


50 40 


Patrick Moore, 


48 00 


Dennis Shehan, 


48 00 


William Reed, 


42 00 


Mary Hurley, 


18 00 


Julia F. Nelson, 


10 00 




«i 35° 4 






For fall encampment, 


387 00 



$1,739 40 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 
Paid. 

James Keyes, for support of Lydia Rob- 
bins, 
For support of Mary A. Law, 
" George W. Robbins, at reform school, 
" support of Sarah B. Childs, 
" ■" Mrs. N. F. Haynes and 

family, 
" support of William F. B. Whitney and 

family, 
" assistance rendered Mrs. Hiram Hunt, 
G. A. Cady, for entertaining travellers, 
Winthrop F. Conant, for assisting foreign 

pauper, 
James E. Billings, journey to Stow after 

George Berry, 
Do., journey to Maiden respecting Mrs. N. 

F. Ha^ynes and family, 
Do., journey to Boston respecting W. F. B. 
Whitney and family, 



$98 33 


4 


00 


26 


00 


17 


25 


36 


53 


71 


75 


12 


00 


9 


75 


2 


00 


1 


50 


3 


75 


3 


00 



$285 86 



NOTES AND INTEREST. 


Paid. 




Ebenezer Conant, note and interest, 


$1,868 25 


Augustus Conant, interest, 


240 00 


David M. Handley, do., 


102 00 


Frederic Rouillard, do., 


90 00 


'Silas P. Blodgett, do., 


68 61 


James E. Billings, do., 


6Q 00 


Daniel Harris, do., 


48 32 


Joel Hanscom, do., 


40 80 


James Kcyes, do., 


30 80 


John R. Whitcomb, do., 


30 00 


James A. Billings, do., 


12 00 


Isaac T. Flagg, do., 


6 00 







TOWN OFFICERS. 

Paid. 

Wm. AY. Davis, for examining teachers, 

superintending schools, and making 

report, $75 00 

John E. Cutter, for collecting taxes for 1865, 125 00 
William D. Tuttle, for taking inventory and 

making taxes, 30 00 

Do., for copying taxes, writing bond, and 

warrant, 5 00 

Do., for services as Town Clerk, 25 00 

Do., for recording 40 births, 12 00 

Do., " " 23 deaths, 4 30 

Do., " " 16 marriages, 2 40 

Samuel Hosmer, for taking inventory and 

making taxes, 25 00 

Luther R. Forbush, for taking inventory 

and making taxes for 1865, 24 50 

Do., for taking inventory and making taxes 

for 1866, 
James E. Billings, for services as Selectman, 
Jonas K. Putney, " " 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, " 



$2,602 78 



25 


00 


38 


00 


13 


30 


25 


00 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 

Paid. 

William D. Tuttle, for journey to Sudbury 
to make out certificate of election of 
representative, $2 00 

Daniel H. Wetherbee, for services on the 

town farm, 112 70 



$429 50 



44 


00 


6 


40 


10 


00 


18 


56 


1 


75 


462 


00 



Dan'l II. Wetherbee, for journey to Tewksbury, 1 20 
For one pair oxen for town farm, 215 00 

Hastings & Cutler, for rent of school room, 50 00 

Cyrus Fletcher, for returning 24 deaths to 

Town Clerk, 2 40 

Do., for attending 22 funerals with the 

hearse, 
Do., for repairing old hearse, 
J. E. Cutter, for getting dogs licensed, 
Do., coal for town hall, 
Do., summoning 14 persons to take oath of 

office, 
For new hearse, 
Hiram J. Hapgood, for tolling bell for 3 

deaths, 60 

George W. Sawyer, for tolling bell for 16 

deaths, 3 20 

James Tuttle, for rent of school room two 

years, 100 00 

George H. Harris, for opening town hall 34 

times, 
Do., for 16 gallons oil, 
Do., for cleaning town hall, 
Do., broom for town hall, 
Do., floor brush for town hall, 
Do., repairing town clocks, 
Do., 6 chimnies for town hall, 
Do., taking care of town clocks, 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, for 1 1-2 clays' time 
' to Hudson and Yv r orcestor, to contract 

for hearse, 
Do., expenses to Hudson and Worcester, 
Do., for 4 1-2 yards cloth, to repair old 

hearse, 7 48 

Do., sponge, pail and feather duster, for 

hearse, 3 92 

Do., express, postage and stationery, 8 52 

James E. Billings, for journey to Boston 

respecting State Aid, 3 00 



33 


25 


12 


95 


1 


67 




40 


1 


25 


1 


50 




75 


25 


00 


3 


00 


3 


60 



CEMETERY EXPENSES. 

Paid. 

Ivory Keyes, for two stone posts, 84 00 

Charles Hastings, for expenses on West 

Cemetery, 54 55 

Martin Pike, for mowing brush in East 

Cemetery, 11 CO 



$1,136 10 



8 



John Harris, for mowing brush in North 

Cemetery, 7 00 

Samuel Hosmer, for five days labor in East 
Cemetery, 

Do., for stakes, 

Luke Smith, for labor, 

William D. Tuttle, for labor, 

Do., for trees, 

Do., for joist, 

D. H. Wetherbee, for labor, 

John Cohollen, for labor, 



9 


00 




33 


1 


00 


9 


00 


1 


00 


1 


45 


15 


00 


3 


00 



$116 33 



CONDITION OF THE TREASURY, FEB. 26, 1867. 



RECEIPTS. 




Balance in treasury, Feb. 26th, 1866, 


$4,739 02 


State Tax for 1866, 


2,760 00 


County Tax for 1866, 


731 51 


Town Grant for 1866, 


2,500 00 


Town Grant for Schools, 


2,225 00 


Highway Deficiencies, 


59 79 


Overlay on Taxes, 


50 75 


Corporation Tax, 


339 07 


State Aid to Jan. 1st, 1866, 


1,233 36 


State School Fund,. 


132 90 


From County Commissioners, for grading 


. 


hill near the house of Geo. C. Wright, 


149 36 


Armory rent for 18Q5, 


125 00 


Do. for 1866, 


150 00 


From Town of Quincy, for aid furnished 




Mrs. Hiram Hunt, 


12 00 * 


For burial of Winifred A. Hews, 


5 00 


School money from Town of Sudbury, 


5 00 


Fall encampment, 


387 00 


Cash of James Tuttle, 


600 00 


Use of town hall, 


62 00 




«ifi oca 7g 






EXPENDITURES. 




For Support of Schools, 


$2,532 90 


Repairs on School Houses, 


94 24 


Books and Printing, 


144 82 


Roads and Bridges, 


698 66 


Discount and Abatement on Taxes, 


437 63 



For State Aid and Soldiers' Fay, 
Support of Poor, 
Notes and Interest, 
Town Officers, 
Miscellaneous Expenses, 
Cemetery Expenses, 
State Tax, 
County Tax, 



Balance in Treasury Feb. 26, 1867, $2,557 03 



1,739 


40 






285 


86 






2,602 


78 






429 


50 






1,136 


10 






116 


33 






2,760 


00 






731 


51 








— 813, 


709 


73 



FINANCIAL CONDITION OF THE TOWN FEB. 23, 1867. 
Dr. 

To Balance due as per Report, Feb. 26, 

1867, $2,557 03 

Amount due from State for Aid furnished 

Soldiers and their Families, 1,424 40 

83,981 43 



AMOUNT DUE ON NOTES. 
Cr. 

By Cash of Ebenezer Conant, 
Joel Hanscom, 
Augustine Conant, 
David M. Handle}', 
John R. Whitcomb, 
James A. Billings, 
Calvin Harris, - 
James Keyes, 
Isaac T. Flagg, 
Daniel Harris, 
Silas P. Blodgett, 
James E. Billings, 
Frederic Rouillard, 



Balance against the Town Feb, 26, 1867, 
without including the Balance due as 
per Overseers' Report for 1867, 



82,058 00 






700 


40 






4,116 


00 






1,745 


90 






506 


50 






202 


60 






214 


60 






627 


60 






105 


50 






840 


86 






1,117 


47 






1,120 


10 






1,771 


34 








— 815 


,126 


87 




811,145 


44 



JAMES E. BILLINGS, 

JONAS K. PUTNEY, } Selectmen of Acton. 

J. K. W. WETHERBEE, 



J 



Acton, Feb. 26, 1867. 
2 



REPORT OF THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES, 

AT THE 

ALMSHOUSE, IN ACTON, 
For the Year Ending April 1st, 1867. 



ARTICLES ON HAND APRIL 1st, 1867, 

4 1-2 tons bay, $135.00 ; 11 bows, G60.00, $795 00 
1 horse, 100.00 ; 2 shotes, 25.00 ; 11 fowls, 6.82, 
450 lbs. pork, 67.50 ; 110 lbs. beef, 14.30, 
118 1-2 lbs. ham, 27.77 ; Gb bush, potatoes, 35.75, 
80 lbs. lard, 12.00 ; 12 lbs. butter, 4.56, 
1 bush, beans, 4.00 ; 2 1-2 do. rye, 3.12, 
13 lbs. candles, 1.95 ; 9 do. dried apple, 1.62, 

5 lbs. oheese, .60 ; 2 do. tea, 2.00 ; 12 do. tallow,. 1,20, 
25 lbs. soap grease, 1.50 , 1-3 bbl. soap, 1.67, 
1 bbl. pickles, 2.00 ; 15 bush, ashes, 2.50, 
10 M skewers, 6.00 ; skewer timber, 4.00, 



131 


82 


81 


80 


63 


52 


16 


56 


7 


12 


a 57 


3 


80 


3 


17 


4 


50 


10 00 


$1,120 86 



RECEIPTS. 

For milk, $759.89 ; oxen, 210.00, 
apples, 96.00 ; calves, 78.03, 
cow, 70.00 ; potatoes, 73.00, 
beef, 24.14 ; cart and harness, 32.00, 
shote, 10.00 ; skewers, 23.96 ; pork, 3.98 T 
poultry, 7.01 ; eggs, 2.45 ; squashes, 2.57,. 
hide, 4.57 ; drag plank, 2.50, 
keeping pedlers, 3.25 ; use of oxen, 1.75, 

Cash from Town Treasury, 



$96i> 89 


174 


03 


143 


00 


56 


14 


37 


94 


12 


03 


7 


07 


5 


00 


$1,405 


10 


215 


00 


$1,620 


10 



11 



EXPENDITURES. 

For oxen, $216.00 ; cows, 304.00 ; shotes, 13.00, $533 00* 

meal, 108.93 ; oil-meal, 56.90 ; beef, 76.22, 242 05 

flour, 60.00; butter, 72.77 ; clothing, 39.03, 171 80 

molasses, 36.32; cheese, 25.92; hay, 33.65, 95 89, 

sugar, 14.35; tools, 13.01; labor, 18.75, 46 11 

blacksmith's bill, 14.48 ; shoes and boots, 8.35, 22 83 
coffee, 9.82 ; grass seed, 13.74 ; tea, 5.90, • •'■ 29' 46 

beans, 8.50 ; medicine, 2.25 ; spices, 4.68, , , 15 43 

fish, 6.48 ; plaster Paris, 6.20 ; barrels, 4.15, , 16 83 

bread, 3.25; salt, 5.33 ; vinegar, 4.05, 12 63 

oil, 3.30 ; lard, 2.50 ; tallow, 3.85 ; potash, 2.42, 12 07 

tripe, 2.50 ; earthen ware, 2.50 ; brooms, 2.25, 7 25 

newspaper, 2.70; skewer timber, 8.00; onions, 1.45, 12 15 

tobacco, 3.40; cream tartar, 1.50; raisins, 1.98, 6 88 

oats, 1.15 ; tin ware, 1.00 ; soap, 1.30 ;nails, 1.07 ; ink, .18, 4 70 

dried apple, 1.25 ; matches, 1.20 ; repairing harness, 1.70, 4 15 

cash to paupers, 1.85 ; milk, .25 ; calf, 2.00 ; castings, .78, 4 88 

saltpetre, .25 ; peas, .60 ; tar, .20 ; ox labor, 2.25, 3 30 

wooden ware, 1.20 ; yeast, .64 ; wicking, .46 ; starch, 23, 2 53 

doctor's bill, 2.50 ; rosin, .20 ; soda, .34 ; whiting, .08, 3 12 

rope, ,60 ; sawing lumber, .70 ; use of bull, 4.75, 6 05 

expenses to Boston, 13.60 ; do. to Brighton, 2.00, 15 60 

services of Mr. and Mrs. D. H. Wetherbee, .300 00 

James E. Billings' services, 6 00 

Jonas K. Putney's " 6 00 

J. K. W. Wetherbee's « 6 00 



Amount of inventory, April 1, 1866, $990 09 

Interest on farm, 239 40 



$1,586 71 

$1,229 49 
$2,816 20 



RECAPITULATION. 

Amount of receipts, $1,620 10 

Amount of expenditures, 1,586 71 



Cash on hand, $33 39 

Total amount of expenditures, $1,586 71 

Amount of inventory, April 1, 1866, 990 09 

Interest on farm, 239 40 

$2,816 20 



12 



Total amount of receipts, $1,405 10 

Amount of inventory, April 1, 1867, 1,120 86 

$2,525 96 



$290 24 
Expense of victualling foreigners, 17 60 



Total amount of supporting poor at Almshouse, $272 64 

Whole number of persons (exclusive of foreigners) supported 
in the Almshouse, 6 ; average number, 4 ; present number, 3 ; cost 
per week $1.31. 



James E. Billings, \ Overseers 
Jonas K. Putney, > of 

J. K, W. Wetherbee, J Poor. 



Acton, April 1, 1867. 



Acton, March 20, 1867. 



This is to certify that I have examined the above reports and 
find that the same appear to be correct. 

Wm. D. Tuttle, Auditor. 



TOWN -CLERK'S REPORT. 



BIRTHS REGISTERED IN ACTON, IN 1866. 

No. Date of Birth. Name of Child and Parents' Names. 

1. Jan. 1, Nelson A. Mead, son of O. W. and Mary E. Mead. 

2. Jan. 8, Frank Harlan Tuttle, son of Wm. D. and Elizabeth B. 

Tuttle. 

3. Feb. 4, David Thomas Kinsley, son of Richard and Eliza 

Kinsley. 

4. Feb. 13, Mary Alice Knights, daughter of George W. and 

Francis A. Knights. 

5. Feb. 18, Charles Barry Parker, son of Edwin C. and Hannah 

H. Parker. 

6. Feb. 24, Julia McCarthy, daughter of Daniel and Mary 

McCarthy. 

7. Feb. 25, Eugene Clifford Stevens, son of Frank and Frances 

Stevens. 

8. Feb. 28, Lyman Davis Robbins, son of Simon and Nancy D. 

Robbins. 

9. March 5, George Edgar Robbins, son of John M. and Lydia 

Ann Robbins. 

10. March 14, Elliot Prouty Livermore, son of Hiram B. and Laura 

E. Livermore. 

11. March' 21, Joseph William Livermore, son of George W. and 

Carrie A. Livermore. 

12. March 25, Walter J. Curtis, son of Nehemiah and Martha C. 

Curtis. 

13. April 19, Oscar Pratt, son of Henry and Aria T. Pratt. 

14. April 19, Willie A. Sumner, son of Alson R. and Carrie A. 

Sumner. 

15. May 12, Harry Edson Hosmer, son of John E. and Emma E. 

Hosmer. 

16. May 13, Stevens Hay ward, son of Joel F. and Sarah E. Hay- 

ward. 

17. June 5, Theodosia Bertha Wright, daughter of George C. and 

Susan H. Wright. 

18. June 11, Adelbert Francis Mead, son of Varnum B. and D. 

Elizabeth Mead. 

19. June 20, Almon H. Gilmore, son of Walter A. and Emma A. 

Gilmore. 

20. June 25, Hattie Adell Davis, daughter of George W. and Mary 

J. Davis. 

21. July 25, Honora Callanan, daughter of Daniel and Ellen Cal- 

lanan. 



14 



22. July 25, Julia Lane, daughter of Morris and Mary Lane. 

23. July 31, John Sidney White, son of John and Sarah A. White. 

24. Aug. 10, Julietta Wilkins, daughter of William and Henrietta 

Wilkins. 

25. Aug. 24, Florence Elizabeth Faulkner, daughter of William 

H. and Caroline A. Faulkner. 

26. Aug. 25, Frank Arthur Teel, son of William H. and Mary E. 

Teel. 

27. Aug. 31, Erminie Louisa Davis, daughter of Alvin A. and 

Mar}^ Davis. 

28. Sept. 1, Millard Johnson Handley, son of Reuben and Caro- 

line M. Handley. 

29. Sept. 18, William Dawson, son of James and Margaret 

Dawson. 

30. Oct. 11, Abbie Francis Coughlin, daughter of John and Mar- 

garet Coughlin. 

31. Oct. 19, Mary Raddin, daughter of Patrick and Hannah 

Raddin. 

32. Oct. 31, Catherine Hayes, daughter of Michael and Mary 

Hayes. 

33. Nov. 1, Alice Pauline Hay ward, daughter of Paul and Alice 

L. Hayward. 

34. Nov. 15, , daughter of Daniel L. and Sally Veasie. 

35. Nov. 16, William D wight Davis, son of William B. and S. 

Maria Davis. 

36. Nov. 18, Lizzie L. Boynton, daughter of Frank M. and Diantha 

11. Bo3 T nton. 

37. Dec. 2, Ada Violetta Gardner, daughter of George and 

Violetta F. Gardner. 

38. Dec. 19, Ilattie Evelyn Wheeler, daughter of Sanford and 

Susan E. Wheeler. 

[Omitted last year inadvertently.] 
1865. 
Aug. 24, Isabel Richardson, daughter of Edward F. and Frances 

H. Richardson. 



MARRIAGES RECORDED IN 1866 r 

No. Date of Marriage. Names of the Farties. 

1. Feb. 2, Mr. Edward B. Richards, of Chelmsford, and Mrs. 

Lydia A. Farmer, of Pepperell. 

2. Feb. 26, Mr. josiah W. Bride and Miss Esther J. Willard, 

both of Acton. 

3. March 6, Mr. Charles W. Fletcher and Miss Angie H. Tarbell, 

both of Acton. 



15 

4. March 6, Mr. Orin Bartlett and Miss Frances Ann Wheeler, 

both of Lowell. 

5. March 20, Mr. Charles W. Parker, of Freetown, N. Y., and 

Miss Emma Wlieeler, of Acton . 

6. May 29, Mr. Joseph W. Whcrren, of Elliot, Me., and Miss 

Hepsa A. Fletcher, of Aeton. 

7. May 31, Mr. Charles A. Harrington, of Wisconsin, and Miss 

Mary Jane Faulkner, of Acton. 

8. July 3, Mr. Edward L. F. Randolph, of Springfield, and Miss 

Hattie A. Harris, of Acton. 
0. July 2*), Mr. Joseph Day, of South Dedham, and Mrs. Jane 
E. Brown, of Boxboro\ 

10. August 12, Mr. Patrick Callanan, of Aeton, and Miss Annie 

Griffin, of Boxboro'. 

11. Sept. 11, Mr. Joseph R. Bassett and Miss Clara Wetherbee, 

both of Acton. 

12. Sept. 23, Mr. Henry W. Sawyer, of Mason Village, N. H., 

and Miss Sarah E. Lawrence, of Stow. 

13. Nov. 6, Mr. Abel Farrar, Jr., and Miss Delina Borden, both 

of Acton. 

14. Not. 6, Mr. Daniel H. Farrar and Miss Susan P. Fletcher, 

both of Acton. 

15. Nov. 29, Mr. Charles A. Phillips and Miss Annie M. Mitchell, 

both of Acton. 

16. Dec. 30, Mr. James P. Clare and Miss Elclora V. Wyman, 

both of Acton. 



DEATHS IN ACTON, IN 1866. 

Ko. Date of Death. Names of Deceased. 

1. Jan. 2, Nelson A., son of Oliver W. and Mary E. Mead, aged 

one day. 

2. Jan. 14, Mrs. Mary E. Mead, wife of O. W. Mead, aged 33 

yrs. 7 mos. 6 days. 

3. Jan. 15, Mr. Stephen Weston, aged 43 yrs. 6 mos. 

4. Jan. 20, Mrs. Sophia L. Chaplin, wife of William Chaplin, 

aged 50 yrs. 1 mo. 25 days. 

5. Jan. 27, Mr. Artemas Roweil, aged 69 yrs. 1 mo. 13 days. 

6. March 1, Mrs. Eliza Powers, aged 43 years. 

7. March 1, Patrick Powers, son of John and Eliza Powers, aged 

1 yr. 6 mos. 

8. March 9, Jennie Wetherbee, daughter of Daniel 11. and Lucy 

Wetherbee. aged 7 yrs. 1 mo. 21 d;»\ ;. 

9. March 9, Mr. Ephraim Hosmer, aged 78 yrs. 9 mos. 

10. March 11, Henrietta J. Harris, wife of George II. Harris, 
aged 31 yrs. 5 mos. 12 days. 



1(3 



11. March 13, Mrs. Lydia P. Robbins, widow of Eben Robbins, 

aged 76 years. 

12. April 21, Walter J., son of Nehemiah and Martha C. Curtis, 

aged 1 month. 

13. June 2, Julia, daughter of Daniel and Mary McCarthy, aged 

3 months. 

14. June 18, George O. Phillips, son of Win. II. and Sarah A. 

Phillips, aged 15 yrs. 5 mos. 1G days. 

15. July 6th, Mr. Luther Conant, aged 80 yrs. 5 mos. 22 days. 

16. Aug. 23, Mrs. Lavina Knapp, aged 74 years. 

17. Aug. 28, Mrs. Susan B. Hay ward, wife of Stevens Hay ward, 

Esq., aged 76 years. 

18. Sept. 12, Mrs. Louisa M. Blanchard, aged 74 years. 

19. Sept. 24, Mrs. Sarah Graham, aged 94 years. 

20. Nov. 3, Frank Harlan, son of Wm. D. and Elizabeth B. 

Tuttle, aged 9 mos. 26 days. 

21. Nov. 16, Mr. Benjamin W. Seamans, aged 50 years. 

22. Dec. 23, Mr. Phineas Taylor, aged 77 }ts. 3 mos. 8 days. 

William D. 'Buttle, Town-Clerk. 
Acton, March 20, 1867. 



REPORT OF CEMETERY-COMMITTEE. 



WEST CEMETERY. 






Receipts. 






Cash on hand Feb. 26, 1866, 


$13 98 




" received for seven lots sold, 


7 00 




" " for grading two lots, 


3 00 




" " from Town-Treasurer, 


40 00 


$63 98 


Expenditures. 




Cash paid Ira Stockwell, for labor, 


$38 50 




" " for moving gravel, 


6 88 




" " for postage and stationery, 


28 




Cash in Committee's hands, March 15, 1867, 


18 32 


$63 98 


EAST CEMETERY. 




Receipts. 






Cash for two lots sold, 


$2 00 




Cash from Town-Treasurer, 


69 33 


$71 33 


Expenditures. 




Paid for mowing brush and lotting up squares, 


$25 00 




grading grounds, 


22 00 




joist, 


1 45 




Paid Luke Smith, for work, 


1 00 




for trees set out, 


1 00 




for stakes, 


33 




. for lettering stakes and avenue boards, 


14 55 




for two stone-posts, 


4 00 


$69 33 
2 00 


Cash in Committee's hands, March 20, 1867, 





$71 33 
NORTH CEMETERY. 

Expenditures. 
Cash paid for mowing brush, $7 00 

Receipts. 
By cash from Town-Treasurer, $7 00 

William D. Tuttle, \ CemetenJ 
Samuel Hosmer, } !^ emet ^ 
Charles Hastings, J C™™tit*e. 
Acton, March 20, 1867. 



LIQUOR-AGENT'S REPORT. 



Amount of Liquors Sold to February 20, 1867. 

39 gallons whiskey, $128 70 

14 " gin, 71 40 

113 " rum, 317 98 








Stock on 

15 gallons whiskey, 

1 " gin, 

2 " brandy, 
15 " rum, 


hand, February 20, 1867. 

$49 50 

5 10 

23 74 

42 64 


$120 98 








$639 06 


54 gallons whiskey, 
15 " gin, 
2 " brandy, 

128 " rum, 

Agent's salary, 

Government license, 


Expenditures. 

$154 22 
66 17 
20 56 
343 48 
25 00 
25 00 


$634 43 







Net gain to the town, 
Acton, Feb. 20, 1867. 



$4 63 
D. J. Wetherbee, Liquor- Agent. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL-COMMITTEE, 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON, 



FOR THE 



SCHOOL-YEAR, 1866 -'67. 



CONCORD : 

PRINTED BY BENJAMIN TOLMAN. 

1867. 



REPORT. 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

The School-Committee respectfully submit their Aunual 
Report. 

^Ye believe the Town does not intend the cause of Educa- 
tion should languish. During the last two years it has 
added five hundred and twenty-five dollars to its appropria- 
tion for schools. This is an addition of about one-third the 
amount formerly raised for the purpose, and enables us to 
maintain our schools about twenty-eight weeks during the 
year. If the Town did not increase its appropriation for 
educational purposes as its wealth and resources increased, it 
would not be true to its own interests. Amidst the hurried 
activities of life its citizens ought not to forget that a subject 
that relates to the future character and prosperity of its 
youth, should occupy no ordinary place in their consideration. 
Very likely some of this money has not been expended to 
the best advantage, but w T e believe it has been the object of 
each member of the Committee to make the best possible use 
of it. 

We thiuk that each succeeding year parents evince a 
deeper interest in the culture of their children, and that the 
Committee endeavor to exercise more caution in the selection 
of teachers. The more money the Town raises, the more 
particular the Committee ought to be to secure teachers who 
understand the most approved methods of imparting instruc- 



tion, and of performing the greatest amount of labor while 
the schools are in session. Much more can be accomplished 
now in the same time than was the case in former 3'ears, and 
although in respect to some tilings inventive genius may 
seemed to have reached its utmost limits in regard to public 
instruction, there is doubtless room for still further improve- 
ment. It is true, as a general thing, that a town like this 
cannot command so able teachers as the more wealthy and 
populous ones, but when we are fortunate enough to get good 
teachers we should offer them all the encouragement to 
remain we can afford. We believe our schools are conducted 
to some extent, at least, in a manner to promote the moral as 
well as intellectual culture of the pupils. The moral facul- 
ties of children need cultivation, in order to promote their 
growth, as well as the intellectual. Some of our children 
receive but little of this instruction at home, which makes it 
the more necessary that they should receive it at school. 
What kind of a citizen does a man make who has no fear of 
God before his eyes, or conscientious regard for what is 
right? Whatever his intellectual attainments may be he is 
certainly a dangerous member of society, and the more so 
for his education for culture is power. A parent wishes to 
contemplate his child in the future, not merely as a scholar, 
but as a religious being, guided by philanthropic and chris- 
tian principles, and contributing his share to all benevolent 
institutions and the general good of mankind. 

The health of our children is another thing to be cared for 
in our schools. The teacher should see that as even a tem- 
perature as possible is kept in the school-room. It is dan- 
gerous to have it range at blood heat at one time, and in half 
an hour after be down to nearly freezing point. The smaller 
children need attention at noon and recess. Thej should be 
required to put their hats on when they go out, and not be 
allowed to sit in a current of air when they come in. When 
the eye of the parent cannot be on their little ones, the eye 
of the teacher should be. The health of a child is very 
precious. Most of our schools are now taught throughout 



the year by females, and it is generally conceded that they 
succeed as well in the instruction and management of the 
schools as males. Still we believe some of our schools at 
certain times demand male teachers, — those who can admin- 
ister correction forthwith and on the spot. In order to keep 
up a proper degree of discipline a female might sometimes 
have to make a too free use of the expelling power. There 
are cases when this is absolutely necessary, but the less of it 
a teacher can get along with the better, as we do not want to 
make vagrants of our children. None but very able female 
teachers should be employed to take charge of our winter 
schools. 

There have been two cases of somewhat general insubor- 
dination in school, one in the Centre and the other in the 
South-East District ; but we will pass over this disagreeable 
subject by simply remarking that the fewer cases of this kind 
we have to report in these days of improved humanity, the 
more agreeable it will be to all good citizens throughout the 
town. 

We don't know as this town is troubled more with truancy 
than many others, but we do know that some of our boys are 
sometimes seen loitering along the streets, or lounging about 
public places, when they ought to be in school. Such 
scholars are a disgrace to themselves and a dishonor to their 
parents. It is bad enough to lose the money appropriated 
for their education, but this is of small account compared 
with the degradation to which they are tending. There are 
others who absent themselves at examinations. This is a 
source of mortification to the teacher, and makes the school 
appear to disadvantage. The teacher is not to be blamed for 
these evils. It belong to parents to see that their children 
do not play truant or absent themselves at examinations. 

The Committee have endeavored to put such teachers into 
our schools as had a very good knowledge of the common 
English branches, and more or less acquaintance with some 
of the higher ones ; but we believe no observing person can 
go the round of our examinations without becoming con- 
4 



vinced that our common schools cannot be expected to fully 
meet the educational wants of the town. We think the time 
has conic, whether the town realizes the fact or not, when a 
school should he established in which some of the higher 
branches of education should be thoroughly taught. 

Many of our school-houses have been cold and uncomfort- 
able for many years, and they are continually growing worse. 
The subject of new ones must therefore soon come before the 
town, and we trust the citizens' will be prepared to meet it 
with their accustomed promptitude and liberality. 

Quackenboss' Grammar has'been exchanged, the past year, 
for Kerl's. The former was quite a good and comprehensive 
system of Grammar, but it was not popular with the 
teachers or a favorite book with the scholars. Kerl's Gram- 
mar is a splendid book. It takes the subject up in an 
attractive manner, and embraces a very general knowledge of 
the science. "Kerl's Elements" may seem rather hard for 
beginners, but with judicious teachers we believe it is as 
near what is required as can be obtained. The "Common 
School >' really ought not to be taken up except by the first 
class. It is better to pursue the other until a considerable 
knowledge of this branch of study is acquired. 

In consequence of an act of the legislature of I860, mak- 
ing a somewhat different distribution of the income of the 
State School Fund, this town received the last year about 
forty dollars more than heretofore. There are four private 
schools now in progress in town, consisting of about one 
hundred and ten pupils. 

Hints to Teachers. We believe our schools are generally 
conducted pretty well, but we suppose none of our teachers 
claim perfection in their employment. We think, with the 
exception of some of the older scholars, it is better for 
classes to stand when they recite. This is a more lively 
attitude, and the class presents a better appearance. We are 
frequently troubled at examinations with scholars reciting in 
a low and feeble tone of voice. This is not on account of 
any weakness of the lungs, for these same children may be 



heard when at play as well as others. It is a serious draw- 
back to the appearance of the school, and an occasion of dis- 
appointment to those who come in to witness its progress. 
Children need to be exercised considerably in loud speaking 
and distinct articulation. 

It is no unusual thing, when we visit schools, to observe 
questions passed over only imperfectly answered. Such 
answers may be equivalent to no answers at all. The scholar 
should be required to give the answer as it is in the book, or 
in language that contains the same idea. If a child is 
allowed to get into a careless, indifferent method of expres- 
sion, the habit may adhere to him through life, marring his 
appearance and impairing his usefulness. 

The subject of Grammar should receive more attention in 
some of our schools. It is not a very attractive study with 
beginners, but becomes more so by giving attention to it, 
and is of every-clay importance to everybody. 

Perhaps in no branch has there been more improvement 
made during the year than in Robinson's Intellectual Arith- 
metic. Three years ago this book was but indifferently 
attended to. We believe a small class in the West District 
were the first to go through it, but they were quickly fol- 
lowed by a few in the Xorth and East and quite a class in the 
South Districts. We trust every school in town will soon 
furnish scholars who can master the book. 

CENTRE DISTRICT. — Titer Department. 

Teachers: Miss Emeline S. Jewell, Miss Edith E. Frost, 
Mr. Daniel C. Farr, Mr. Harris C. Hartwell. 

Miss Jewell, a teacher of much experience and uniform 
success, taught the summer term. Both parents and pupils 
worked harmoniously with her, and her management of the 
school was successful. Miss Frost had charge of the school 
in the fall. Her manners were genial, she was energetic and 
decided, and her discipline was good. Her examination did 
not do her justice, but some parts of it were good and it was 
evident the school had advanced during: the term. She was 



succeeded in the winter by Mr. Farr. He was an estimable 
young man, but some of the scholars taking advantage of his 
youth and inexperience, he resigned his charge at the end of 
six weeks. He Avas followed by Mr. Hartwell, who, though 
mild and considerate, was firm in his government, and 
carried the school through the remaining five weeks with 
entire success. The public exercises at the close of the 
school were very gratifying. 

Primary Department. 

Teacher: Miss Carrie E. Lawrence. 

This school is composed of bright, intelligent children, and 
Miss Lawrence proved herself the right teacher in the right 
place. She had entire control of her pupils, and everything 
appeared neat and systematic. A great deal of precision 
was manifest in all her arrangements. She made study 
pleasant, and the scholars almost invariably came out to 
recite with well prepared lessons. Her examinations were 
interspersed with gymnastic and other exercises, and the 
large number of visitors were highly pleased. 

WEST DISTRICT. — Utter Department. 

Teachers: Miss L. A. McCutchins, Miss A. Wetherbee. 

Miss McCutchins resumed her labors here in the spring. 
Her abilities as a teacher are well understood. Her field of 
labor was an encouraging one, for there are many good 
scholars here, and they study with an earnestness and con- 
stancy that does them credit. Co-operating as they did with 
their accomplished teacher, their progress, both in the com- 
mon and some of the higher branches, was rapid, and the 
examination at the close of the fall term surpassed those we 
usually witness in a common district school. 

Miss Wetherbee took charge in the winter. She had been 
a teacher many years, came highly recommended, and taught 
with much diligence and thoroughness. In giving instruction 
we observed she left her scholars, in a reasonable degree, to 
depend upon themselves. This, though not always agree- 
able to pupils, is nevertheless essential to their permanent 



progress. The discipline the latter part of the term was not 
altogether creditable to some of the scholars. With this 
exception her examination compared very well with former 
ones in this district. A large class in Intellectual Arithmetic 
added interest to the occasion. 

Intermediate Department. 

Teacher: Miss E. C. Brown. 

This teacher enjoyed the affection and confidence of her 
scholars, and taught throughout the year with success. She 
did not exert herself so much to make a splendid show at 
examination as she did to give her pupils positive, obvious 
attainments. At the close of her school in the fall there 
seemed to be a want of activity and sprightliness in some of 
the exercises, but at the examination of the winter term the 
school appeared to advantage, especially in Reading and 
Arithmetic. There are scholars in this school who require 
vigorous trainino:. 

Primary Department. 

Teachers: Miss Mary S. Ballou, Miss Cornelia C. Ballou. 

This department, during the year, has been under the in- 
struction of diligent and judicious teachers, and is getting a 
fair start in the first principles of education. It requires 
considerable genius to present knowledge to these young 
minds so as to make the pursuit of it interesting. The dry 
questions in the text-books do not afford all the stimulus they 
need. There is a great deal besides to which it is necessary 
to call their attention, and which it is important for them to 
know. We were well satisfied with the examination of this 
school, both at the close of the fall and winter terms. 

SOUTH DISTRICT. — Upper Department. 

Teachers: Miss Helenette Colby, Miss Mary E. Clement. 

We are able to speak of this school in terms of much 
commendation. It deserves a high rank among the schools 
of the town. We think for several years it has not appeared 
better than at the close of the winter term. There are 



10 

several excellent scholars in Written Arithmetic, and a 
splendid class in Robinson's Intellectual. The recitations in 
Grammar and other branches deserve much praise. The 
school appeared well under Miss Colby's management, and 
Miss Clement performed her duty with gratifying results. 
Old text-books and new were alike familiar to her. If there 
were any scholars during the winter term who failed to im- 
prove their advantages, we hope they have reflection enough 
to realize their mistake. 

Intermediate Department . 

Teachers: Miss Lottie C. Faulkner, Miss Amelia D. 
Comstock. 

Under the instruction of these faithful and experienced 
teachers this department could not fail to flourish. Miss 
Faulkner expects her scholars to get their lessons, — their 
Heading lessons as well as others. She is very explicit in 
her explanations, and makes the most of her time. Her 
scholars always love her, and the district never fails to ap- 
preciate her services. No branch is slighted, and her miscel- 
laneous exercises are always interesting. 

The winter term was taught by Miss Comstock. Under 
her instruction the reputation of the school was sustained. 
The first principles of education received clue attention, a 
good degree of system and discipline were always apparent, 
and her examination indicated a commendable industry and 
perseverance on the part of both teacher and scholars. 

Primary Department. 

Teachers: Miss Julia S. Conant, Miss Evelina Davis. 

Both these teachers arc good scholars, and they entered 
upon their business with activity and enterprise. Miss 
Conant exercised her scholars considerably upon the black- 
board, which is an excellent method of interesting children. 
She had the faculty of getting their attention, which is of the 
first importance in any school. At her examination in the 
fall we were gratified with the results of her labors, espec- 
ially in the important branch of Reading. She was sue- 



11 

cceded in the winter by Miss Davis. Her school was pretty 
large, and she, being young and inexperienced, was not able 
to keep so good a degree of discipline as was desirable. At 
her examination, however, the deportment of her school was 
good, her scholars were well classified, and the recitations 
generally commendable. 

SOUTH-EAST DISTRICT. 

Teachers: Miss Amelia D. Comstock, Miss Sarah Loker, 
Miss Emily Loker, Mr. L. H. Ewings. 

This school has its share of lively, interesting scholars, 
and perhaps more than its share of those who are ready to 
play truant and trouble the teacher. Considering their ages 
there are some very good scholars in Arithmetic, Geography 
and Writing. During the summer and fall terms this school 
prospered under the management of Miss Comstock. The 
scholars were ambitions, neatness and order prevailed, and 
everything appeared encouraging. The winter term was 
commenced by Miss Sarah Loker. She taught two weeks 
with success, when a yearly school being offered her in 
another part of the State, she resigned her place to Miss 
Emily Loker, who, after teaching about three weeks and 
finding some of the scholars hard to manage, retired from 
her position. She was succeeded in her office by Mr. Ew- 
ings, who, after being relieved of certain scholars, taught the 
remaining two months with profit to the district, and had a 
good examination. This school requires, in the winter, a 
male teacher of energy and decision. Of the twenty-eight 
scholars who attended this school in the winter, seventeen 
were from Acton, six from Sudbury, and five from Concord. 
Concord promptly pays a satisfactory sum for the tuition of 
her scholars. Sudbury now pays nothing, giving as a reason 
that she provides within her own limits ample accommoda- 
tions for her pupils. The member of the Committee from 
this district thinks he shall object to her scholars attending 
longer on such conditions. 



12 

EAST DISTRICT. 

Teachers: Miss S. Augusta Davis, Mr. Daniel S. Davis, 
We think this school has made steady and substantial im- 
provement during the year. Both the teachers were resi- 
dents of the district, and doubtless felt more than ordinary 
interest in the advancement of their neighbors' children. 
Miss Davis taught with the success which might be expected, 
considering her scholarship and experience. She kept a 
minute record of the recitations and deportment of her 
pupils. This is calculated to stimulate them to make efforts 
to excel, and might be a good system for other teachers to 
adopt. Under her instructions the more important parts of 
Geography received especial attention, and both she and her 
successor taught Robinson's Intellectual and higher Written 
Arithmetics with success. 

NORTH DISTRICT. 

Teacher: Miss Angie Wheeler. 

We can speak of this school in the most encouraging 
terms. The scholars here study with an interest that knows 
no abatement. They have everything to encourage them, 
for their teacher is very thorough in all the branches taught, 
and her interest in her business is such as to inspire anima- 
tion in any school. There are fine scholars here in all the 
common branches, especially in Reading and Grammar, and 
Algebra and History are successfully taught. The examina- 
tion of this school at the close of the winter term afforded an 
example of the progress scholars will make when under the 
instruction of energetic and well qualified teachers for 
several successive terms. 



13 



SCHOOL CHILDREN AND APPROPRIATION. 

The number of children in town between the ages of five 
and fifteen, as ascertained on the first day of May last by the 
Assessors, was 328. 

Appropriation for support of schools, 1866-7, $2,225 00 
Share of State School Fund, 132 90 

Received for scholars attending our schools from 

other towns, 25 00 



Sum total, $2,382 90 

Sum appropriated by the town for each scholar between 
the ages of five and fifteen inclusive, $6.78. 

Respectfully, in behalf of the School-Committee, 

Wm. W, Davis, Chairman. 



Wm. W. Davis, ^ 
O. W. Mead, 
J. E. Harris, 
John Fletcher, 
Calvin Harris, 
Isaac T, Flagg,^, 



School 
> Committer 



14 




FINANCIAL. 




CENTRE SCHOOL. 




Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 


$427 70 
7 52 



Amount of teachers' wages, 

Paid for fuel, 

Care of School-House, 

Deficiency this year, 
March 18, 1867. 



$408 75 

23 60 

4 40 



$435 22 



$436 75 



1 53 
Wm. W> Davis, Committee. 



WEST SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 
Deficiency last year, 



Amount of teachers' wages, 

Paid for fuel, 

Care of School-House, 

Incidentals, 

Balance to new account, 



March 18, 1867. 



$611 00 
4 89 

$553 50 

37 50 

7 00 

6 30 

1 81 



$606 11 



$606 11 



O. W. Mead, Committee. 






SOUTH SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 
Received of F. Brown, 

Amount of teachers' wages* 

Paid for fuel, 

Care of School-House, 

Incidentals, 

Balance to new account, 



$611 00 


2 37 


$558 50 


33 75 


6 25 


12 24 


2 63 



$613 37 



$613 37 



March 18, 1867. 



J. E. Harris, Committee. 



15 



SOUTH-EAST SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 

Amount of teachers' wages, 

Paid for fuel, 

Incidentals, 

Balance to new account, 



$244 40 


31 


93 


$251 


95 


15 


00 


6 


50 


2 


88 



$276 33 



$276 33 



March 18, 1867. 


John 


FLfcfCHER, C 


EAST 

Appropriation* 

Balance from last year, 

i 


SCHOOL 


$244 40 
23 84 


Amount of teachers' wages, 

Paid for fuel, 

Incidentals, 

Balance to new account, 


$236 50 
22 00 

5 92 
3 82 



$268 24 



$268 24 



March 18, 1867, 



Calvin Harris, Committee. 



NORTH SCHOOL, 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 

Amount of teachers' wages, 

Paid for fuel, 

Incidentals, 

Balance to new account, 

March 18, 1867. 



$244 40 


5 


03 


$227 


00 


16 


00 


4 


84 


1 


59 



$249 43 



$249 43 



Isaac T. Flagg, Committee. 



16 



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ANNUAL EEPOETS 



SELECTMEN AND OTHER OFFICERS 



TOWN OF ACTON, 



FEBEUARY 26, 1867, to FEBEUARY 26, 1868, 



INCLUDING THE 



Marriages, Births and Deaths in 1867. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



CONCORD: 

PRINTED BY BENJAMIN TOLMAN. 

1868. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



RECEIPTS. 
Amount received, $15,415 42 



EXPENDITURES. 

SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 

Paid. 

O. W. Mead, for West school, $645 10 

Luther W. Piper, for South school, 645 10 

Charles Little, " Centre " 450 45 

John Fletcher, 2d, for Southeast school, 244 69 

Isaac T. Flagg, u North u 244 68 

Calvin Harris, " East " 255 82 



TOWN OF LITTLETON FOR SCHOOLING. 

Paid. 

Carrie A. Jewett and Eri J. Raymond, $4 00 



$2,489 84 



REPAIRS ON SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

Paid. 

L. W. Piper, for repairs on South school-house, $14 42 

O. W. Mead, for repairs on West school-house, 27 22 

Calvin Harris, for repairs on East school-house, 15 30 
Isaac T. Flagg, for repairs and shingling North 

school-house, 68 07 
Charles Little, for repairs on Centre school- 
house, 9 80 
John Fletcher, 2d, for repairs on Southeast 

school-house, 11 88 

O. W. Mead, for shingling West school-house, 58 50 

Do., for repairs on West school-house in 1866, 32 96 



$238 15 



BOOKS AND PRINTING. 

Paid. 

For school-books, $64 12 

" printing warrants, 7 50 

" " Selectmen's reports, 12 50 
" " Selectmen's, Town Clerk's, and 

School Committee's reports, 86 94 

" town order books, 13 25 

" highway books, 1 26 

" collector's book, 1 00 

" record book for cemetery, 15 

" scholarship and deportment cards, 12 25 



ROADS AND BRIDGES 
Paid. 

Charles F. Richardson, for breaking roads, 
Nehemiah Curtis, for labor on highway in 1866, 
John F. Blood, for labor on highway, 
Luther Billings, for breaking roads, 64£ hours, 
Israel H. Giles, for breaking roads, 46 hours, 
Cyrus Fletcher, for repairs on Powder-Mill 
bridge, 



$2 


33 


10 


00 


2 


40 


11 


90 


9 


20 


2 


00 



$198 97 



$37 83 



DISCOUNT AND ABATEMENT ON TAXES. 
Paid. 

Francis Dwight, for abatement on taxes, $46 93 

John E. Cutter, discount on taxes, 522 98 

$569 91 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR SOLDIERS AND FAMILIES. 

Paid. 

Soldiers for May drill, 1866, $114 50 

Rebecca C. Wright, 

Rebecca Bigelow, 

Hattie W. Wilder, 

Alson R. Sumner, 

Johanna Col man, 

Sarah J. Davidson, 

Hiram W. Wetherbee, 

Luke Smith, 

William Reed, 

John S. Hoar, 

Paul Hayward, 10 00 

Eliza Conant, . 8 00 

Maria Kinsley, 8 00 

Daniel L. Veaze} r , 6 00 



96 


00 


96 


00 


96 


00 


51 


00 


41 


00 


40 


00 


35 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 



$637 50 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 

Paid. 

Dr. I. Hutchins, for services rendered 
stranger, 

For George W. Robbins, at reform school, 
" support of Sarah B. Childs, 
" nursing Thomas F. Law, 

James Adams, for coffin for T. F. Law, 

Thomas F. Hammond, for burial of T. F. 
Law, 

Dr. John W. Osgood, for attending Thomas 
F. Law, 

City of Charlestown, for support of W. F. 
B. Whitney, in February, 1867, 

Town of Harvard, for support of Rhoda 
Burnham, 

For assistance rendered travellers, 

James E. Billings, journey to Natick, re- 
specting Thomas F. Law, 

Do., journey to Maiden, respecting Mrs. N. 
F. Haynes and Family, 

Do., journey to Bolton, respecting settle- 
ment of Rhoda Burnham, 

Do., journey to Harvard, respecting settle- 
ment of Rhoda Burnham, 



$2 50 


19 


50 


18 


00 


26 


00 


8 


00 


5 


00 


28 


00 


5 


00 


3 


50 


2 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


2 


50 



$129 00 



INTEREST ON NOTES. 



Paid. 

Calvin Harris, Interest, 

Augustine Conant, " 

Frederick Rouillard, " 

Joel Hanscomb, " 

Daniel Harris, " 

Ebenezer Conant, " 

Silas P. Blodget, " 

David M. Handley, " 

James A. Billings, " 

James E. Billings, " 

Lydia R. Keyes, " 

Isaac T. Flagg, " 



$12 


00 


240 


00 


90 


00 


40 


80 


48 


32 


120 


00 


65 


47 


102 


00 


12 


00 


90 


96 


36 


00 


6 


00 



$863 55 



TOWN OFFICERS. 

Paid. 

Win. W. Davis, for examining teachers, 
superintending schools, and making 
report, $75 00 

Francis Dwight, for collecting taxes, 80 00 

William D. Tuttle, for taking inventory and 
making taxes, including copying taxes 
and making returns, 43 50 

Elisha H. Cutler, for taking inventory and 
making taxes, 

Luther R. Forbush, do., 

William D. Tuttle, for services as Town 
Clerk, 

James E. Billings, for services as Selectman, 

Jonas K. Putney, " " 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, " u 



25 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


35 


00 


14 


00 


20 


00 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 

Paid. 

Yor one pair oxen for town farm, $230 00 

Hastings & Cutler, for rent of school-room 

for 1866, 
Abel Farrar, Jr., for services on town farm, 
For express, postage and stationery, 
For sealing standard weights and measures, 
Cyrus Fletcher, for coffin and robe for 

Luther Hay ward, 
Do., for removing two bodies in West Cem- 
etery, 
Do., for shingling almshouse, 
Do., for returning 30 deaths to Town Clerk, 
Do., for attending 22 funerals with the 

hearse, 55 00 

Wm. D. Tuttle, for journey to Sudbury to 
make out election return of representa- 
tive, 
Do., for collecting and recording 35 births, 
Do., for collecting and recording 21 mar- 
riages, 
Do., for collecting and recording 29 deaths, 
George W. Sawyer, for taking care of town 

clock, 
Do., for 28 gallons oil, 
Do., cleaning town clock, 



50 


00 


25 


00 


6 


41 


10 


50 


12 


75 


2 


00 


43 


50 


3 


00 



2 


50 


10 


50 


3 


15 


4 


90 


10 


00 


1G 


80 


1 


50 



$342 50 



Do., 237 pounds coal, 1 75 
Do., 36 lamp wicks, 60 
Do., setting 2 lights glass, 56 
Do., 1 broom, 38 
Do., washing floor, 2 00 
Do., opening town hall 54 times, 40 50 
Do., tolling bell for 12 deaths, 2 40 
H. J. Hapgood, for tolling bell for 7 deaths, 1 40 
James Tuttle, for rent of school-room, 50 00 
W. C. & O. Shepard, for rent of school- 
room, 50 00 
Albin Whitcomb, for damage done to 

wagon on the highway, 6 00 

George M. Brooks, for advice, 2 00 



$745 10 



CEMETERY EXPENSES. 
Paid. 

Wm. D. Tuttle, for paint for cemetery posts, $0 99 

Work at cemetery, 2 00 

Charles Hastings, for West do., 40 00 
Samuel Hosmer, hinges, setting stone posts, 

and hanging gates at the East do., 10 35 

Cyrus Fletcher, for two gates to cemetery, 8 25 

Martin Pike, for labor at cemetery, 24 00 



885 59 



CONDITION OF THE TREASURY, Feb. 26, 1868. 



RECEIPTS. 




Balance in the Treasury, Feb, 


, 26, 1867, 


$2,557 03 


State Tax for 1867, 




4,600 00 


County Tax for 1867, 




819 29 


Town Grant for 1867, 




2,500 00 


Town Grant for Schools, 




2,325 00 


Highway Deficiencies, 




54 79 


Overlay on Taxes, 




124 31 


Corporation Tax, 




573 39 


State Aid to Jan. 1, 1867, 




1,200 00 


Cash from State for Soldiers' 


Drill, 


25 40 


State School Fund, 




164 84 


Cash for School Books. 




2 37 



For Armory Rent for 1867, 


150 


00 


Burial lots in cemetery, 


4 


00 


Use of town hall, 


98 


75 


Stock sold at town hall, 


7 


93 


Use of hearse, 


2 


00 


Cash of Elias Haynes for highway taxes, 


1 


43 


School money from town of Concord, 


20 


00 


Cash from town farm, 


33 


39 


" for running-part of old hearse, 


25 


00 


" for military drill, 


114 


50 


" for poll taxes, 


12 


00 

&1n 415 42 








EXPENDITURES. 




For Support of Schools, 


$2,489 


84 


Repairs on School Houses, 


238 


15 


Books and Printing, 


198 


97 


Roads and Bridges, 


37 


83 


Discount and Abatement on Taxes, 


569 


91 • 


Appropriation for Soldiers and Families 


, 637 


50 


Support of Poor, 


129 


00 


Interest on Notes, 


863 


55 


Town Officers, 


342 


50 


Miscellaneous Expenses, 


745 


10 


Cemetery Expenses, 


85 


59 


State Tax, 


4,600 


00 


County Tax, 


819 


29 

4111 1 757 93 






V 1 1 5 1 'M £0 



Balance in the Treasury, Feb. 26, 1868, $3,658 19 



FINANCIAL CONDITION OF THE TOWN, Feb. 26, 1868. 

Dr. 

To Balance due as per Report, Feb. 26, 1868, $3,658 19 
Amount due from State for Aid furnished 

Soldiers and their Families, 667 00 

$4,325 19 



AMOUNT DUE ON NOTES. 



Cr. 




By Cash of Ebenezer Conant, 


82,058 00 


Joel Hanscom, 


700 40 


Augustine Conant, 


4.116 00 


David M. Handle}', 


1,745 90 


John R. Whitcomb, 


536 50 


James A. Billings, 


202 60 


Calvin Harris, 


214 60 


Lydia R. Keyes, 


627 60 


Isaac T. Flagg, 


105 50 


Daniel Harris, 


840 86 


James E. Billings, 


2.237 57 


Frederic Rouillard, 


1,778 10 




$15,163 63 



Balance against the Town, Feb. 26, 1868, 
without including the balance due as 
per Overseers' Report for 1868, $10,838 44 



JAMES E. BILLINGS, ) Selectmen 
JONAS K. PUTNEY. } of 
J. K. W. WETHERBEE, j Acton. 



Acton, Feb. 26, 1868. 
2 



REPORT OF THE 
EECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES, 

AT THE 

ALMSHOUSE IN ACTON, 

For the Year Ending April 1st, 1868. 



ARTICLES ON HAND APRIL 1st, 18G8. 

8 tons hay, $184.00 ; 12 cows, 730.00, 
1 horse, 240.00 ; 76 bush, corn, 114.00, 
14 fowls, 10.50 ; 3£ bush, barley ,5.25, 
550 lbs. pork, 77.00 ; 1 bbl. soap, 6.00 ; 

1 bbl. pickles, 2.00 ; 30 lbs. soap grease, 1.80, 

2 bush, potatoes, 2.00 ; 30 lbs. candles, 5.40, 
2 bbls. apples, 6.00 ; 65 lbs. ham, 14.30 

80 lbs. lard, 11.20 ; 20 bush, ashes, 5.00, 
2 lbs. butter, 1.00 ; £ bbl. flour 7.75, 
i bush, meal, 90 ; 47 lbs. dried apples, 8.46, 
36 M skewers, 



$914 


00 


354 


00 


15 


75 


83 


00 


3 


80 


7 


40 


20 


30 


16 


20 


8 


75 


9 


36 


23 


40 



$1,455 96 



RECEIPTS. 



For milk, $1,017.83; carrying milk, 28.00, $1,045 83 

cows, 98.00; horse, 75.00; oxen, 238.42, 411 42 

calves, 60.00 ; skewers, 41.16 ; potatoes, 42.00, 143 16 

peaches, 17.42 ; lard, 1.12 ; grapes, 2.50, 21 04 

apples, 75.14 ; eggs and paper, 2.59 ; pumpkins, .35 78 08 

$1,699 53 
Cash from town Treasury, 355 00 

$2,054 53 



11 

EXPENDITURES. 

For oxen, $230.00; cows, 245.00; horse, 240.00, $715 00 

meal, 89.06 ; oil, meal and shorts, 244.41, 333 47 

beef, 45.53 ; flour, 84.35 ; butter, 47.02, 176 90 

clothing, 21.36 ; molasses, 24.40 ; cheese, 18.74, 64 50 

hay, 45.45 ; sugar, 17.04 ; tools, 6.87, 69 36 

labor, 16.00 ; blacksmith's bill, 16.13 ; beans, 250, 34 63 

fish, 9.32 ; boots and shoes, 7.25 ; fowls, 1.50, 18 07 

bbls and boxes, 6.73 ; grass-seed, 9.93 ; potash, 5.67, 22 33 

rope, 45 ; chimney and stove-polish, 20 ; surcingle, 75, 1 40 

buffalo robe, 14.00 ; repairing harness, 62 ; cement, 34, 14 96 
bug-poison, 1.14; doctor's bill, 14.40; expenses to 

Boston, 4.20, 19 74 

weighing hay, 1.20; newspaper, 1.40; lumber, 2.62, 5 22 

use of cart, 1.50 ; use of wagon, 75 ; use of bull, 3.50, 5 75 

use of sleigh, 50 ; pasturing, 14.00 tripe, 1.88, 16 38 

tallow, 4.94 ; coffin, 13.00 ; board of Mrs. Bowker, 4.00, 21 94 

books, 32 ; nails, 50 ; earthen ware, 94 ; raisins, 1.32, 3 08 

repairing pumps, 3.80 ; wooden ware, 1.40 ; starch, 16, 5 36 

castings, 3.45 ; tea, 9.70 ; bread, 2.46 ; brooms, 1.00, 16 61 

camphor, 12 ; tobacco, 10.66 ; spices, 3.47, 14 25 

medicine, 1.85, coffee, 4.94; apples, 1.20, 7 99 

- matches, 1.20: vinegar, 3.00; ink, 08, 4 28 

soap, 34 ; rice, 39 ; plaster Paris, 2.25, 2 98 

cream tartar, 45 ; saleratus, 44 ; saltpetre, 05, 94 

oil, 3.74 ; salt, 7.81 ; ox labor, 75 ; oats, 50, 12 80 

services of Mr. and Mrs. Abel Farrar, Jr., 325 00 

James E. Billings's services, 6 00 

Jonas K. Putney's " 6 00 

J. K. W. Wetherbee's " 6 00 



Amount of inventory April 1st, 1867, $1,120 86 

Interest on farm, 239 40 



$1,930 94 

1,360 26 
$3,291 20 



RECAPITULATION. 

Amount of receipts, $2,054 53 

Amount of expenditures, 1,930 94 



Cash on hand, $123 59 

Total amount of expenditures, 1,930 94 

Amount of inventory April 1st, 1867, 1,120 86 

Interest on farm, 239 40 

3,291 20 



12 

Total amount of receipts, $1,699 53 

Amount of inventory April 1st, 1868, 1,455 96 



3,155 49 



135 71 

Expense of victualling foreigners, 22 44 



Total amount of supporting poor at almshouse, $113 27 

Whole number of persons (exclusive of foreigners) supported 
in the Almshouse, 7 ; average number, 3J ; present number, 5 ; 
cost per week, 66. 

James E. Billings, ) Overseers 
Jonas K. Putney, > of 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, ) Poor. 
Acton, April 1, 1868. 



Acton, March 24, 1868. 
This is to certify that I have examined the reports of the Select- 
men and Overseers of the Poor for 1867, so far as the figures and 
method of presenting the financial affairs of the town are con- 
cerned, and believe them to be correct. 

¥m. D. Tdttle, Auditor. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



BIRTHS IN ACTON, IN 1867. 

No. Date of Birth. Xame of Child and Parents' Names. 

1. Jan. 7, Carrie S. Richardson, daughter of Osman D. and Mary 

E. Richardson. 

2. Jan. 9, Hattie Augusta Haynes, daughter of Elias E. and 

Abbie E. Haynes. 

3. Jan. 10, Josie Cristell Tuttle, daughter of Joseph F. and Jen- 

nie E. Tuttle. 

4. Jan. 13, Oren Mortimer Kidder, son of John M. and Sarah E. 

Kidder. 

5. Jan. 18, George Laforest Robbins, son of Elbridge J. and 

Ellen M. Robbins. 

6. Feb. 2, Melvin Ephraim Cobleigh, son of Ephraim and Harriet 

E. Cobleigh. 

7. Feb. 13, George Crampton, son of Charles A. and Martha E. 

Cramp ton. 

8. Feb. 18, Ann Maria Gallagher, daughter of Patrick and 

Bridget Gallagher. 
- 9. Feb. 27, Freddie W. Reed, son of Reuben L. and Mary A. 
' Reed. 

10. March 31, Willie Francis Butterfield, son of Francis B. and 

Anna M. Butterfield. 

11. May 14, Lylian M. Wilbur, daughter of William P. and Olive 

M. Wilbur. 

12. May 25, Loria Grace Wild, daughter of George and Etta F. 

Wild. 

13. June 12, Fred Stanley Whitcomb, son of Frank and Frances 

L. Whitcomb. 

14. June 20, Brown, son of Charles A. and Betsey A. 

Brown. 

15. June 23, Mary Ellen Brackett, daughter of William H. and 

Ellen L. Brackett. 

16. June 29, Bertha May Hartwell, daughter of Henry and Augusta 

H. Hartwell. 

17. July 8, Sarah Ellen Hammond, daughter of Thomas W. and 

Mary A. Hammond. 



14 

18. Aug. 21, John William Haggerty, son of William 2d and 

Catherine Haggerty. 

19. Aug. 25, Florence Amelia Gaddis, daughter of John and Jen- 

nie Gaddis. 

20. Sept. 4, Adie Estelle Houghton, daughter of Warren and 

Lydia A. Houghton. 

21. Sept. 10, Emily Gertrude Harmon, daughter of Michael and 

Mary A. Harmon. 

22. Sept. 13, Martha Fletcher Smith, daughter of Henry M. and 

Abbie B. Smith. 
23 and 24. Sept. 16, Mary D. and Susan P. Farrar, daughters 
of Abel, Jr. and Delina Farrar. 

25. Sept. 20, Lizzie Etta Mellen, daughter of Benjamin and Lizzie 

Mellen. 

26. Oct. 2, Margaret Ann Trainor, daughter of Hugh and Honora 

Trainor. 

27. Oct. 3. Frank Herbert Billings, son of James E. and Tamson 

Billings. 

28. Oct. 10, Hattie M. Johnson, daughter of Oscar S. and Susan 

B. M. Johnson. 

29. Oct. 12, Alice Maria Gates, daughter of Albert and Maria W. 

Gates. 

30. Oct. 23, Warren Oscar Robbins, son of Simon and Nancy D. 

Robbins. 

31. Oct. 28, Freddie Walter McDonnell, son of George and Mary 

McDonnell. 

32. Oct. 30, William Granville Whitney, son of William F. B. and 

Anna Whitney. 

33. Nov. 2, Hattie Frances Sumner, daughter of Alson R. and 

Carrie A. Sumner. 

34. Nov. 12, Horace Herbert Robbins, son of Luke J. and Mary 

W. Robbins. 

35. Dec. 21, Blanchard, son of Luke and Jerusha M. 

Blanchard. 
Males, 15 ; Females, 20. 



MARRIAGES SOLEMNIZED AND RECORDED IN 1867. 

No. Date of Marriage. Names of the Parties. 

1. Jan. 1, Mr. Marcus M. Raymond, of Lowell, and Miss Martha 

M. Sawin, of Acton. 

2. Jan. 1, Mr. George W. Knowlton and Miss Angie H. Wheeler, 

both of Acton. 

3. Jan. 9, Mr. Hiram Chase and Miss Julia E. Edmonds, both of 

Acton. 

4. Jan. 23, Mr. Edwin Fletcher, of Acton, and Miss Susan Smith, 

of Dan vers. 



15 

5. Jan. 23, Mr. D. James Wetherbee and Miss Augusta A. Put- 

ne}^, both of Acton. 

6. Feb. 3, Mr. Luke J. Robbins and Miss Mary Warren Blodget, 

both of Acton. 

7. Feb. 14, Mr. Samuel R. Burroughs and Miss Ella Augusta 

Hay ward, both of Acton. 

8. March 23, Mr. Elbridge Wheeler, of Concord, and Miss Su- 

sanna P. Wetherbee, of Boxborough. 

9. May 5, Mr. George H. Harris and Miss Angenetta Wheeler, 

both of Acton. 

10. May 29, Mr. Jonas T. Houghton, of Hudson, and Miss Mary 

J. Hapgood, of Bolton. 

11. June 20, Mr. Delette H. Hall and Miss Susie A. Wetherbee, 

both of Acton. 

12. August 17, Mr. Josiah H. Chase and Miss Anna F. Noyes, 

both of Concord. 

13. Aug. 31, Mr. Joseph Stewart, of Lunenburg, and Mrs. Lucinda 

B. Brown, of Fitchburg. 

14. Sept. 10, Mr. Thomas F. Trow, of Bolton, and Miss Abbie 

Hamant, of Dedham. 

15. Sept. 19, Mr. Ira V. Hall and Mrs. Caroline B. Bradford, both 

of Acton. 

16. Sept. 23, Mr. Francis Colburn, of Boston, and Miss N. Anna 

Hamant, of Medfield. 

17. Oct. 5, Mr. Waldo G. Dunn and Miss Fannie M. Burnham, 

both of Acton. 

18. Oct. 13, Mr. Selden Kimball and Miss Eliza A. Kelly, both of 

Lowell. 

19. Nov. 21, Mr. James E. Heywood and Miss Mary E. Hanscom, 

both of Concord. 

20. Nov. 28, Mr. William V. Norton and Miss Lauraetta W. Reed, 

both of Acton. 

21. Dec. 25, Mr. Myron F. Going, of Acton, and Miss Maria W. 

Taylor, of Littleton. 



DEATHS IN ACTON IN 1867. 

No. Date of Death. Xames of Deceased. 

1. Jan. 5, Mrs. Nancy Bryant, aged 40 yrs. 5 mos. 4 days. 

2. Jan. 15, Mr. John Hapgood, aged 64 yrs. 11 mos. 5 days. 

3. Jan. 20, Miss Rosena T. Jones, aged 15 yrs. 3 mos. 12 days. 

4. Jan. 22, Carrie S., daughter of Osman D. and Mary E. Rich- 

ardson, aged 15 days. 

5. Jan. 24, Mrs. Hannah B. Smith, aged 42 }ts. 6 mos. 23 days. 

6. Jan. 26, Alice P. Hay ward, daughter of Paul and Alice L. 

Hayward, aged 2 mos. 23 days. 



16 

7. Feb. 1, Ada Violetta Gardner, daughter of George and 

Violetta F. Gardner, aged 2 mos. 

8. Feb. 15, Mr. William Chaplin, aged 55 years. 

9. Feb. 18, Mr. Henry Skinner, aged 38 yrs. 

10. Feb. 21, Mr. Luther Hayward, aged 57 yrs. 

11. Feb. 21, Mrs. Sarah W. Milliken, wife of Benjamin Milliken, 

aged 44 }ts. 

12. March 15, Josie C. Tuttle, daughter of Joseph and Jennie E. 

Tuttle, aged 2 mos. 8 days. 

13. April 6, Mr. Ivory Keyes, aged 62 yrs. 

14. April 25, Mrs. Rhoda Reed, wife of Isaiah Reed, aged 45 yrs. 

6 mos. 8 days. 

15. May 6, Mrs. Naomi Chaffin, widow of John Cbaffin, sen., aged 

86 yrs. 2 mos. 27 days. 

16. May-12, Mr. Edward Wetherbee, aged 56 yrs. 11 mos. 9 days. 

17. May 15, Ida J. Nye, daughter of John and Clara F. Nye, aged 

9 mos. 

18. May 17, Mr. James Keyes, aged 58 yrs. 1 mo. 11 days. 

19. May 22, at Cincinnati,' Ohio, Mr. Lowell F. Wood, of Acton, 

aged 41 yrs. 

20. May 28, Mrs. Cynthia Chaffin, wife of John Chaffin, aged 55 

yrs. 11 mos. 2 days. 

21. Aug. 28, Mr. Benaiah Robbins, aged 83 yrs. 

22. Sept. 17, Susan P., daughter of Abel jr. and Delina Farrar, 

aged 1 day. 

23. Oct. 7, Mrs. Sarah L. Tuttle, wife of Varnum Tuttle, aged 

37 yrs. 

24. Oct. 28, Lylian M. Wilbur, daughter of William P. and Olive 

M. Wilbur, aged 5 mos. 14 days. 

25. Nov. 23, Mrs. Rebecca F. Cummings, aged 82 yrs. 

26. Dec. 16, Eva A. Jones, daughter of Aaron M. and Augusta 

Jones. 

William D. Tuttle, Town Clerk. 
Acton, March 23, 1868. 



REPORT OF CEMETERY COMMITTEE. 



WEST CEMETERY. 

Receipts. 



Cash on hand, March 15, 1867, 
received for seven lots sold, 
ic u tt repairing lots, 

" " grass and loam, 

" from Town Treasurer, 
" due committee, 



Expenditures. 

For grading lots and avenues, 
" laying wall and grading, 
" teams, hauling stone and gravel, 
" posts and rails, 
" marble tablets, 



$18 32 


7 


00 


13 


33 


3 


20 


40 


00 


1 


75 


$83 60 


$22 


50 


30 


50 


16 


00 


8 


96 


5 


64 



$83 60 



EAST CEMETERY. 

Receipts. 

Cash on hand March 20, 1867, 
For grass sold, 

44 wood " 

" four lots sold, 
From Town Treasurer, 

$57 59 
Expenditures. 

For mowing and raking brush and clearing up grounds, $30 00 

" paint and labor at cemetery, 2 99 

" gates, hinges, setting posts and hanging gates, 18 60 

Cash paid Town Treasurer for lots sold, 4 00 

Cash on hand March 2, 1868, 200 



$2 00 


5 00 


1 00 


4 00 


45 59 



$57 59 



Acton, March 2, 1868. 
3 



Wm. D. Tuttle, 
Samuel Hosmer, 
Charles Hastings, J 



( Cemetery 



TOWN LIQUOR-AGENT'S REPORT. 



Expenses and Amount on Hand and Bought for year ending 
March 1, 1868. 

Whiskey, 

Gin, 

Brandy, 

Alcohol, 

Rum, 

Agent's salary, 

$653 35 



$148 00 


53 


23 


20 50 


33 


63 


372 


93 


25 


00 



Amount on Hand, March 1, 1868. 

Rum, $44 77 

Whiskey, 22 30 

Gin, 10 35 

Alcohol, 8 09 



Amount Sold for year ending March 1, 1868. 

Rum, $343 21 

Whiskey, 135 25 

Gin, 46 49 

Alcohol, 29 69 

Brandy, 21 68 



$661 83 



Net gain to town. $9 48 



REPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



TOWN OF ACTON, 



SCHOOL. YE^lR, 1867-68. 



CONCORD: 

PRINTED BY BENJAMIN TOLMAN. 
1868. 



REPORT. 



To the Citizens of the town of Acton : 

The Superintendent and School Committee respectfully sub- 
mit their Annual Report. 

The attention of the citizens of the town is annually called 
to the condition of their Common Schools and the cause of 
education in their midst. The purpose to be accomplished in 
this, should be far above the gratification of an idle curiosity, 
or the desire to find something to feed the spirit of criticism 
and censure. That is not the wisest course which seeks to 
magnify errors or increase defects. The cause of education 
constantly encounters obstacles in its advancement, the removal 
of which requires the co-operation, not only of those immedi- 
ately connected with our schools, but of all the friends of educa- 
tion and lovers of good order, morality, and the elevation of 
humanity. Without this co-operation the work of removing 
these obstacles becomes extremely difficult if not impossible. 
The existence of many defects in our Common Schools, clearly 
indicates a want of interest in town, in the great subject of 
education. We do not say, indeed, that parents are not 
sufficiently interested and anxious for the education of their 
children, (though this statement might be true in some instances,) 
but that the real value and importance of education as an 
aid in advancing humanity and perpetuating the noblest bless- 
ings God has given to man, are not sufficiently realized. Our 
country's freedom can rest securely on no other basis. Long 
ago it was said by a wise and good man, u If the time shall 



22 

ever come when this mighty frabric shall totter; when the 
beacon of joy that now rises in a pillar of fire, a sign and won- 
der of the world, shall wax dim, the cause will be found in the 
ignorance of the people. If our union is still to continue to 
cheer the hopes and animate the efforts of the oppressed of 
every nation ; if our fields are to be untrod by the hirelings of 
despotism ; if long days of blessedness are to attend our coun- 
try in her career of glory ; if you would have the sun continue 
to shed his unclouded rays upon the face of freedom, then edu- 
cate all the children in the land. This alone startles the tyrant 
in his dreams of power and rouses the slumbering energies of 
an oppressed people. It is intelligence that reared the majestic 
columns of national glory, and this alone can prevent them from 
crumbling to atoms." We should not forget that there are 
great and important blessings to be secured, not only for our- 
selves and our children, but for humanity, by advancing the 
interests of education. 

We do not know as our town is behind other towns of the 
state in its interest in the cause of education, but we are confi- 
dent that duty demands that we should not be idly content with 
the present condition of things in this respect. 

The last published reports of the State Board of education 
give the standing of the town so far as it can be shown by num- 
bers. 

In the table showing the comparative amount of money appro- 
priated by the different towns in the State for the education of 
each child in the town between five and fifteen years of age, 
Acton is the one hundred and seventieth. 

According to the percentage of taxable property appropriated 
for school purposes, Acton is the one hundred and forty-second. 
According to the average attendance of the children upon the 
public schools, Acton is the fifty-sixth. This, to be sure, is 
not a very bad position in a list of three hundred and thirty- 
five towns; being above the average in these three respects. 



23 

But let us not suppose that this covers the whole ground, or 
that there is no room for improvement in these respects. 

We believe that the use of the scholarship and deportment 
cards introduced by vote of the town one year ago, has had a 
decidedly beneficial effect in stimulating the scholars and in 
bringing Teachers and Parents into co-operation. Their use 
enables the parent to know the standing of the scholar in the 
various studies pursued, and also whether, and how many times 
they are absent or tardy. We think they have generally indica- 
ted the correct standing of the scholars, though it is possible that 
some teachers not being familiar with their use, have not been 
quite careful enough in their numbering. We earnestly recom- 
mend their continued use, with some slight alterations. 

The promise made by the Superintendent, to publish in the 
annual report the names of those who were neither absent nor 
tardy during one, two, or three terms, has also had the effect to 
promote constant attendance and punctuality, and the Roll of 
Honor is presented with the published details of each school. 
Besides those whose names are given, the Registers indicate that 
there are many more who have striven to be thus favorably 
mentioned and who are equally deserving of praise for their 
efforts in this direction. Quite a number have been absent or 
tardy only one day or one half day, and several of these, we 
have reason for believing, were detained by unavoidable, and 
sometimes melancholy circumstances. We believe we have 
given the names of all those who came fully up to the require- 
ments we mentioned at the opening of the schools, and while we 
regret that we must withhold the names of so many who are 
really deserving, we rejoice that the list is so large. 

19 were neither absent nor tardy three terms. 
32 " " " " " two " 

105 " " " " " one " 



24 

School Buildings. 

We presume that all will agree in the statement that we need 
some better school buildings. Some of them are unfit for the 
purposes for which they are used, and there are none which of 
themselves give evidence of great interest in the cause of edu- 
cation on the part of the town. 

The impression which they make upon the scholars is not 
such as to lead them to appreciate the value and importance of 
education. Much of the surroundings of our school-houses is of 
a repulsive character. They can and ought to be made attrac- 
tive both externally and internally. Maps and charts should 
find a place upon walls which are now barren of every impres- 
sion to the mind except that of reckless disregard of propriety 
and neatness. More attention and outlay in this direction 
would promote the prosperity of our schools. 

Teachers. 

Without good teachers we cannot have good schools. It is a 
trite saying, but nevertheless a true one " as is the teacher so is 
the school." The teacher's habits, temper of mind, devotion to 
duty and interest in her work, will make an impression upon 
those under her care. How important that this impression be 
of the right kind, and how important therefore is it that great 
care and judgment be exercised in the selection of teachers who 
are thus to mould and direct, in a greater or less degree, the 
subsequent course of our children. We need good disciplina- 
rians. That kind of discipline is most desirable which draws 
by love ; and is vastly more effective than that which drives by 
fear. We have seen teachers who prided themselves upon their 
ability to govern, who, after all, were lacking in the ability to 
create in their pupils a love for good order. The necessity of 
obedience, and the reasonableness of the requirements made, 
they never attempted to show. Their will was law ; and to this 
the child must yield unquestioning submission. It is not so 






25 

much a power to crush the activities of the child that is desira- 
ble, as it is an influence that can guide and direct those activi- 
ties in their proper channel. It is not so desirable that children 
. should not dare to do wrong as it is that they should not desire 
to do wrong. 

We need also teachers thoroughly qualified for their work ; 
nor is it always those who are generally regarded as the most 
advanced in scholarship who are best qualified for the teach- 
er's work. One may be, as some of our teachers have been, 
excellent in the higher mathematics and other branches, and yet 
be wanting in a knowledge of the elements of language. In most 
of our schools there is manifest a want of thoroughness in ele- 
mentary principles. This defect can only be remedied by 
employing teachers who are themselves thorough in this respect, 
and who will not neglect this, for that which may be better 
calculated to make a display. 

A frequent change of teachers, though in some cases impera- 
tively demanded, is more often detrimental. A teacher who is 
well acquainted with her pupils, who has already a knowledge 
of their attainments, habits of study, capacity, and disposition 
can more readily comprehend and adapt herself to her work, 
than one who has all this to learn. This must be apparent. 
It is wisdom therefore to retain, if possible, those who have 
succeeded passably well, and have no marked deficiency unless 
important advantages are to be secured by change. We think 
some of our schools have suffered by too frequent changes. 

School Registers. 

Many of the School Registers have been imperfectly returne'd, 
and several teachers have forfeited their legal claim to compen- 
sation by not making correct returns. More care is needed 
upon this work. We might quote several unpardonable mis- 
takes and omissions, but we forbear, only suggesting that here- 
after such defects ought not to be passed over in silence. 



26 

Text-Books, and Course op Study. 

We believe there is an urgent demand for a revision of the 
text-books in use in the town, and that a change, in some at 
least can be made, which will be of decided advantage to the* 
schools. Those now in use have been used for several years 
with the exception of KerFs Grammars, which were introduced 
about two years since. Important improvements have been 
made, and are being constantly made in books to aid the pupil 
in acquiring an education. The process of arriving at desired 
results is often shortened, and the method of fixing important 
principles in the mind improved. The most uninteresting study 
can be made more or less attractive by the manner in which it 
is presented to the pupil, and the most attractive method is 
certainly most desirable- As it is unwise to furnish heavy, 
awkward, and clumsy tools to workmen who are not sufficiently 
strong to use them to advantage, so is it unwise to furnish our 
children with books beyond their age and capacity. There is 
a uniformity in the books used in town which is commendable. 
Is there adaptability ? We are of the opinion that a change in 
all the text-books would be beneficial, and that a change in 
Arithmetics and Grammars is imperatively demanded. In say- 
ing this, we do not desire to call in question the wisdom of 
those by whom they were introduced. We know not how long 
Robinson's series of Arithmetics have been in use in this town, 
but we are confident that there are several series much to be 
preferred to this. The introduction of KerFs Grammar may be 
regarded as an experiment; which has proved unsuccessful. 
We have not seen a class during the past year using this work, 
which manifested any considerable degree of interest. Teach- 
ers, without an exception have united in the opinion that it is 
not as good as others. The continued use of this book will, we 
are confident be followed by an abatement of interest in this 
branch of study. With the best of books it cannot be made 
too attractive. 



27 

We are well aware of the complaints and often opposition 
which usually attend a change of school-books, and we think 
there is sometimes ground for this ; but we are confident that a 
careful examination of many of the text-books now in use, and 
an understanding of the difficulties to be surmounted in their 
use, would render manifest the necessity of a change. 

We must here say something also respecting the studies pur- 
sued. In most of our schools there is too great a variety, and 
too many classes. This is an evil, altogether too prominent to 
be longer tolerated. Parents should seriously take this matter 
into consideration, and not permit their children to take up a 
higher study, until they are masters of those which should pre- 
cede it. The laws of the state require instruction to be given 
to all the children who may attend school, in orthography, read- 
ing, writing, English grammar, geography, arithmetic, the history 
of the United States, and good behavior. They also make alge- 
bra, vocal music, drawing, physiology and hygiene elective, as 
the school committee may deem expedient. Algebra is far 
more generally taught than history, but who will say that it is 
of more practical value ? Physiology and hygiene, or the laws 
of health, are very much neglected, while attention is paid to 
geometry, ancient history, and other of the branches which be- 
long to the high school and academy rather than the common 
school. 

But a still greater evil or mistake lies in the superabundance 
of arithmetic in all our schools, and upon this point we cannot 
better express our ideas than in the language of the school com- 
mittee of a town in Essex county, in their report for 1867 : 

u Probably more than half the time is devoted to that great 
hobby of New England schools, arithmetic; while the remaining 
time is given to the eight or ten other studies usually found in 
our district schools. The best classes are the arithmetic classes, 
and the reputation of the teacher, and of the whole school, not 
un frequently rests on the feats performed by the first class in 



28 

arithmetic on the day of public examination. Woe to the 
teacher who has not a first class in arithmetic. Arithmetic 
should receive its appropriate attention, but it should not take 
the time of other equally important studies. 

"If the great problem of life could be solved by any arithmet- 
ical process, if children had no other faculties than those of 
calculation that need to be exercised, then ' The science of 
numbers and the art of computing by them,' might properly 
receive a large portion of the pupil's time. But is it not quite 
as important that a child's moral and perceptive faculties should 
be developed as his reasoning? Does not his usefulness, his 
happiness and his success in life, depend quite as much upon the 
right training of the former as of the latter ? If so, then ought 
not a change to be made ? That course of instruction that will 
impart the greatest amount of useful information, and best fit 
the children for the duties of life, is the course that should be 
adopted by every teacher 

" One great reason why self-educated men are practical work- 
ers is that they learn nothing they do not want to use, and so 
learn it well. Concentration gives them strength. Napoleon 
dispensed with tents and luggage in his great armies, taking 
only what he wanted to use — the sword and the bayonet. It 
seems to me — and the conclusion has been growing stronger 
each year, during twelve years' experience in public school 
teaching, that much that children are required to learn might be 
omitted with little detriment to them. A matter-of-fact teacher 
would look at his work in something of this manner : These 
boys are, most of them, to become farmers, mechanics and la- 
borers. All the scholastic education they receive will be gained 
here. These girls will, most of them become the wives of far- 
mers, mechanics and laborers. What instruction is absolutely 
essential to these boys and girls to fit them for the duties of 
life ? First they must learn to read, write and spell the Eng- 
lish language. These are often sadly neglected. Almost every 



29 

man, in whatever occupation engaged, is called upon to write 
more or less every day of his life. Writing involves spelling, 
aud both are unmistakable evidences of culture or want of it. 
Teach these thoroughly. They are of vastly more practical 
value than arithmetic — the trite and venerable maxim that the 
study of arithmetic is the best discipline of the mind, to the 
contrary notwithstanding. A knowledge of arithmetic sufficient 
to enable men and women to keep accounts correctly, will suf- 
fice, letting alone the mental discipline of the reasoning facul- 
ties, so often harped about." 

We think the following also from the school Reports pub- 
lished by the Board of Education for 1866, is worthy of con- 
sideration : " The correct use of the English language is a 
most desirable accomplishment, and is worth a long and patient 
practice, even if for its sake we should shorten the time devoted 
to other studies. For example, considering the small practical 
value of difficult arithmetical processes to the great mass of 
men, might we not profitably adopt a shorter and simpler course 
of instruction on this subject ? " 

Our large arithmetics contain much that might be useful to 
a professor of mathematics, but a smaller amount might suffice 
for the wants of men engaged in the common pursuits of life. 
And may it not be because we undertake to teach too much and 
teach it imperfectly, that after all the study of arithmetic in 
schools, men of business construct their own rules, and from 
their own experience learn accuracy and despatch ? Long ago 
an eminent educator said, " I have no doubt that we teach too 
much mathematics. Our children begin at five and continue 
the study of arithmetic and kindred subjects till sixteen. May 
not a part of this time be better spent in acquiring a ready con- 
trol of the resources of our language ? All men have occasion 
to express their thoughts, and in this country, perhaps, more 
than elsewhere, the power of correct and vigorous expression 
is indispensable." Let us carefully consider this matter and 



30 

adopt that course which will best fit the rising generation for 
the practical duties of active live. 

We cannot speak of the schools in town the past year, com- 
pared with former years, but we think they have generally 
improved to an extent which would satisfy reasonable expecta- 
tions. Let us strive to make them still better. 

E. DAVIS, Superintendent. 



CENTRE SCHOOL. 

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 

Teachers. 
Summer — Carrie E. Lawrence. 
Fall, " « « 

Winter — Josie L. Hosmer. 

Whole Number of Scholars. 
Summer — 34, average 29, 
Fall — 35, « 32. 

Winter— 37, " 31. 

Length of School. 
Summer — 2 months. 
Fall — 2 J 
Winter — 3 " 

Wages of Teachers per Month. 
Summer — $24 per month. 
Fall — $24 « " 

Winter — $22 " « 

The teacher of the Summer and Fall terms, having been con- 
nected with the school for several previous terms, was welt- pre- 
pared to enter at once upon that course which would secure the 
permanent advancement of those under her care. The advantages 



31 

derived from retaining a successful teacher were apparent in 
these terms. The teacher aimed at thoroughness, and the 
examination at the close of the Fall term clearly manifested her 
success in this aim. Miss Hosmer, who had charge of the 
Winter term, had never taught, and did not readily comprehend 
the teacher's work, but made much improvement in the progress 
of the school, and the examination was commendable to teacher 
and pupils. 

Roll of Honor. 

The following scholars have been neither absent nor tardy for 

Three Terms — Susie Tuttle, Nellie J. Hanscom, Jenny E. 
Berry, Etta Taylor, Lizzie Roth, Willie Richardson. 

Two Terms — Sophia C. Fletcher, Katie J. Kingsley. 

One Term — Hattie Reed, Rosie Jones, Anna Pike, Luella 
Smith, James Tuttle, Arthur Pike, Frank Pike, John Roth 
Wilbur Fisk. 

CENTRE SCHOOL. 

HIGHER DEPARTMENT. 

Teachers. 

Summer — Miss Prisciila Little. 
Fall— " " " 

Winter — Mr. Omar W. Folsom. 

Whole Number of Scholars. 
Summer — 22; average, 20. 
Fall— 20; " 19. 

Winter — 45; " 38. 

Length of School. 

Summer — 2 months. 
Fall — 2 
Winter — 3 " 



32 

Wages of Teachers. 
Summer — $27 per month. 
Fall — $27 " " 

Winter — $46 " " 

Miss Little, who had charge of the Summer and Fall terms 
was an earnest, faithful, and industrious teacher. She aimed to 
have all recitations thoroughly understood, and in this suc- 
ceeded to a great degree. The most prominent defect in her 
method is in teaching too much, — in not leaving enough to be 
done by the pupil. The true aim of education should be to 
develop, cultivate and strengthen the mind, rather than to pour 
into it a certain amount of knowledge. The winter term, under 
the care of Mr. Folsom, at its commencement gave promise of 
accomplishing much good work, but a spirit of insubordination 
and disregard of propriety detracted from its prosperity. The 
examination was creditable to teacher and pupils, but not so 
much so as it would have been with a deeper interest on the 
part of the pupils. 

Roll of Honor. 

The following scholars have been neither absent nor tardy 
for 

Three Terms — Josie Forbush. 

Two Terms — Ada C. Davis, Lizzie S. Taylor, Davis Richard- 
son, S. Taylor Fletcher. 

One Term — Almeda Litchfield, Theresa Kingsley, Ida M. 
Pike, Allie Burnham, Elvira A. Wheeler, Herbert Blodget, Wil- 
lie C. Jones, Simeon D. Taylor, Charles Barton, Charles Rich- 
ardson, Jonathan P. Blodget. 



33 



WEST SCHOOL. 

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 

Teachers. 
Summer — Miss M. Rebecca Nason. 
Fall — " " " " 

and Miss Mattie E. Ayres. 
Winter — Miss Mattie E. Ayers. 

Whole Number of Scholars. 



Summer — 


-32; average, 28. 


Fall — 


32 ; « 30. 


Winter — 


31; " 29. 




Length of Schools. 


Summer — 


- 2 months. 


Fall — 


2J « 


Winter — 


3 « 




Wages of Teacher. 


Summer — 


- $22 per month. 


Fall — 


22 " " 


Winter — 


24 " « 



This school has enjoyed a good degree of prosperity during 
the year. Miss Nason conducted the school during the summer 
and part of the fall, with marked success. She possessed those 
peculiar qualities which fit her for such a position. In her 
teaching and discipline, she was ever mindful of the faet that 
those under her care were children, and not men and women. 

Having an opportunity to enter a wider field of usefulness, 
she left the school during the fall term, and Miss Ayres suc- 
ceeded her. During the remainder of the fall and the whole of 
the winter term, she conducted the school with good results. 
The examination at the close gf the winter term indicated com- 
mendable progress, and showed a good degree of interest. 

5 



34 

Roll of Honor, 

The following scholars have been neither absent nor tardy for 

Three Terms — George Mead. 

Two Terms — George Hutchings, John Hoar. 

One Term — Ida McDonald, Inez Wyman, Cornelia Hayward, 
Cordelia Hayward, Jennie Eager, Eddie Hayward, Wallace 
McDonald, Willie Teel, Elsworth Hapgood, Irving Hapgood. 

WEST SCHOOL. 

INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT. 

Teachers. 

Summer — Miss Sarah A. S. Taylor. 
Fall — " Edna L. Whitcomb. 

Winter — " Jennie H. Ayres. 

Whole Number of Scholars. 

Summer — 33 ; average, 30. 
Fall— 32; " 30. 
Winter— 31 j " 27. 

Length of School. 

Summer — 2 months. 
Fall — 2 J " 
Winter— 3 " 

Wages of Teachers. 

Summer — $24 per month. 
Fall— $24 « « 
Winter— $28 " " 

All the teachers employed in this school the past year, had 
had considerable experience in teaching. Those of the summer 
and fall terms had acquired a commendable reputation in an 
adjoining town, and being considerably acquainted in the dis- 
trict, commenced their terms under favorable circumstances. 






35 

The teacher of the summer term labored under the disadvantage 
of somewhat impaired vocal power. Her pupils seemed to be 
sympathetically affected, and the school did not, as a conse- 
quence, appear as interesting as it otherwise would. Good 
progress was made in most of the studies, and some excellences 
were apparent. The examination of the fall term showed still 
farther improvement, and during the term we were much pleased 
with Miss Whitcomb's manner of teaching, and governing. Thor- 
oughness in the recitations was a prominent feature during the term. 
The teacher of the winter term had the advantage of extensive 
experience, and came well recommended. The progress of her 
school rendered apparent her power to control her pupils, and 
was less marked with insubordination *than had been some pre- 
vious terms. Considerable progress was apparent in most of 
the studies pursued, and the examination, which was well at- 
tended, and conducted with order, was regarded as evidence of 
a successful school. 

Roll of Honor. 

The following scholars have been neither absent nor tardy 
for 

Three Terms — Lizzie A. Eager, Flora S. Davis. 

Two Terms — Emma A. Mead, Nellie G. Hoar, Lizzie G. 
Rowell, Sumner Wright, Horace E. Whitcomb, Lewis C. Has- 
tings, Frank S. Davis, Edwin E. Davis. 

One Term — Lilla A. Hay ward, Florence Hayward, Emma 
Hall, Lizzie M. Robinson, Jennie Kingsley, Nellie Taylor, Charles 
H. Teel, George Gardner, Frank Derby. 

WEST SCHOOL. 

HIGHER DEPARTMENT. 

Teachers. 
Summer — Miss Mary Stacy. 
Fall — « Lizzie A. Chase. 

Winter — " Lucy M. Emery. 



36 

Whole Number of Scholars* 
Summer — 27; average, 25. 
Fall— 28; « 25. 
Winter— 38; " 37. 

Length of School. 
Summer — 2 months. 
Fall— 2 J " 
Winter — 3 " 

Wages of Teachers. 
Summer — $28 per month. 
Fall— $28 « " 
Winter— $33 " " 

This school, through the year, has been under the care of good 
teachers. Miss Stacy, who taught the spring term, was a supe- 
rior teacher, — thoroughly qualified, — of pleasing manners, 
and refined and correct taste. Her school was well man- 
aged, and the influence and spirit of the teacher was appar- 
ent in the general deportment of the pupils out of school as 
well as in. The progress in the studies pursued was even and 
thorough, and all that ought to be desired. The fall term, 
though hardly equal to the other two, was marked by some 
favorable features, and the examination was satisfactory. 

The winter term was one of unusual interest and eminent 
success. We cannot speak in too high terms of the teacher 
and school. In this school there are a great variety of studies, 
and it has been difficult so to classify it as not to throw a heavy 
burden on the teacher. It ranks first in town in respect to the 
advancement of the pupils. 

Roll of Honor. 

The following scholars have been neither absent nor tardy 
for 

Three terms — Ellen M. Hosmer, Emma Hosmer, Julien A. 
Mead, Ainsworth Hastings. 



37 

Two terms — Henry A. Mead, Clifford Barrett. 

One term — Estella A. Mead, Jennie Wheeler, Ella Whitcomb, 
Alice R. Barrett, Nellie M. Rowell, Maria P. Hastings, Frank 
0. Leland, Sherman H. Barrett, Walter Hastings, Warren H. 
Mead, Frank C. Hayward, Webster Hayward. 



SOUTH SCHOOL. 

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 

Teachers. 
Summer — Miss Victoria Willis. 
Fall, " " " 

Winter — Miss Ella A. Bacon. 

Whole Number of Scholars. 
Summer — 28, average 26. 
Fall— 31, " 27. 
Winter— 42, « 39. 

Length of School. 
Summer — 2 months. * 

Fall— 2i " 
Winter— 3 " 

Wages of Teachers. 
Summer — $20 per month. 
Fall— $20 * " 
Winter— $26 " " 

Both of the teachers in this school were beginners. Primary 
Schools are invariably trying to a teacher, often taxing the 
patience severely. But few teachers achieve marked success in 
a Primary School. This requires a peculiar adaptedness for the 
position, which we do not often find. Miss Willis possessed a 
good degree of acquired ability, and entered upon her task with 



38 

earnest wishes for success, but did not find herself fully pre- 
pared to meet and overcome all the obstacles she was unex- 
pectedly called to encounter. Consequently the schools were 
not as successful as they might have been. Miss Bacon, though 
like her predecessor, wanting in experience, became more 
readily " master of the situation." Comprehending more 
readily the nature of her work, she was untiring in her efforts to 
accomplish it. She won the kind regard of her pupils, and led 
them along with cheerfulness, in the way of improvement. 

Roll of Honor. 

The following scholars have been neither absent nor tardy for 

Three Terms — 

Two Terms — Charles Worster, Michael Hannon. 

One Term — Mary Haggerty, Mary Phelan, Lizzie Richard- 
son, Willie Dow, Alonzo Dow, Frank Taylor, George Worster, 
John Haggerty, Willie Warren, Norman Davidson. 

SOUTH SCHOOL. 





INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT. 




Teachers. 


Summer 


— Miss Lottie C. Faulkner. 


Fall — 


U U it 11 


Winter - 


— " Juliette A. Osgood. 




Whole Number of Scholars. 


Summer 


— 28; average, 27. 


Fall — 


36; " 32. 


Winter - 


-33; " 30. 




Length of School. 


Summer 


— 2 months. 


Fall — 


2J « 


Winter - 


- 3 " 






39 

Wages of Teacher. 

Summer — $26 per month. 
Fall— $26 ■ % 
Winter— $26 " " 

The summer and fall terms were under the care of Miss 
Faulkner; and to say this, is equivalent to saying that the 
schools were eminently successful. Though she has her own 
method of teaching, we found her ready to adopt practical sug- 
gestions made by the Committee. The thorough training of the 
pupils in the elements of language, and vocal exercises, mani- 
fested itself in clear and distinct enunciation. Thoroughness 
was a marked feature of this school. The mental powers of the 
pupils were constantly active to an unusual degree, and compre- 
hended the studies pursued. Miss Osgood, who had never 
taught before, could hardly be expected to make good the place 
occupied by one who was personally acquainted with the pupils 
and experienced in teaching. She entered upon her winter's 
work with an earnest desire to succeed. Her acquired abilities 
were amply sufficient to warrant success, and although the 
school necessarily appeared to a disadvantage when compared 
with previous terms, yet we by no means regard it as a failure. 

Roll of Honor. 

The following scholars have been neither absent nor tardy 
for 

Three terms — Lucy A. Jones, Mary F. Worster. 

Two terms — Hannah Worster, M. Minnie Jones, Georgie A. 
Gates. 

One Term — Hattie E. Fletcher, Nellie Phelan, Jennie A, 
Tuttle, Emma M. Conant, Nellie A. Hannon, Lizzie E. Fletcher, 
Julia Haggerty, Carrie J. Clough, Anna Law, Nelson Haynes, 
Sidney L. Richardson, Willie Rynn, Eddie F. Conant, Wilbur 
Jones. 



40 



SOUTH SCHOOL. 

HIGHER DEPARTMENT. 





Teacher. 


Miss Amelia D. Cumstock, all the terms 




Whole Number of Scholars. 


Summer 


— 31, average, 29. 


Fall — 


30; " 26. 


Winter - 


- 39 ; " 35. 




Length of School. 


Summer 


— 2 months. 


Fall — 


2J " 


Winter - 


-3£ " 




Wages of Teachers. 


Summer 


— $27 per month. 


Fall — 


$27 * " 


Winter - 


- $33 " " 



This school during the year has been under the supervision 
of the same teacher, and in an eminent degree has shown the 
advantages to be derived by retaining teachers who know their 
pupils, and who, consequently must have more interest in them 
than a stranger would be likely to have. Miss Comstock's 
method of teaching is such as is admirably calculated to make 
thorough scholars. She has not aimed at display, a result too 
often secured by mere superficial teaching, but has thoroughly 
instilled principlos into the minds of her pupils. We have 
never witnessed or heard of a spirit of insubordination existing 
on the part of any of the scholars. The quiet, amiable 
disposition of the teacher, her entire devotedness to her work, 
and the ready compliance of her pupils with her requirements, 
and their studious habits combined together, have made this 



41 

school eminently successful during the year. There has been 
no abatement of interest ; and the examination at the close of the 
winter term clearly indicated that this school ranks first in town, 
in regard to the advancement made during the past year. 

Roll of Honor. 

The following scholars have been neither absent nor tardy 
for 

Three Terms — Anna A. Tuttle, Willie E. Wood. ' 

Two Terms — Sophia E. Symonds, Nellie L. Tuttle, Ellen L. 
Jones, Clarence H. Jones, Charles C. Larrelle. 

One Term — Etta Prentiss, Hattie E. Jones, Mary E. Blood, 
Mary A. Rynn, Margaret J. Maillain, Georgie E. Tuttle, Hattie 
E. Handley, Danie F. Hayward, Frank H. Jones, Samuel Jones, 
Frank Conant, George C. Conant, Charles E. Fuller, Jonathan 
P. Fletcher, James P. Brown, Burton H. Butte, Frank J. 
Butte. 



NORTH SCHOOL. 

Teachers. 
Summer — Mrs. Angie W. Harris. 
Fall — 
Winter — Miss Ella S. Randall. 

Whole Number of Scholars. 

Summer — 14; average, 11. 
Fall— 13; " 11. 
: " 17. 



Winter— 20; 

Length of School. 

Summer — 2 months. 
Fall — 2 
Winter— 3£ 



42 

Wages of Teachers. 

Summer — 
Fall — 

Winter — 

The summer and fall terms of this school gave marked evi- 
dence of the advantages to be derived from retaining a teacher 
who understands her work and is acquainted with those under 
her care. Every effort made by teacher and pupils was in the 
right direction, and the result was regular progress. In point 
of nearly all the essentials of a good school, this, we think, 
stands first in town. Under the care of Miss Randall, during 
the winter term, the school made all the progress which was to 
be reasonably expected, though perhaps not quite as much as it 
would have made under the former teacher, and in saying this 
we would not in the least disparage the interest or ability of the 
teacher of the winter term. With the experience and acquaint- 
ance with the pupils possessed by her predecessor, we doubt 
not her success would have been more remarkable. It is not 
often that teachers succeed so well in their first term. We 
were much gratified by the examination of the school at the 
close of the winter term. 

Roll of Honor. 

The following scholars have been neither absent nor tardy 
for 

Three Terms — 

Two Terms — Cora Rouillard, Granville Rouillard, Freddie 
Rouillard. 

One Term — Irving A. Flagg. 



43 

EAST SCHOOL. 

Teachers. 

Summer — Miss Emma Wetherbee. 
Fall, " " « 

Winter— " Charlotte A. Dutton. 





Whole Number of Scholars. 


Summer 


— 33, average 27. 


Fall — 


29, " 23. 


Winter - 


- 40, " 34. 




Length of School. 


Summer 


— 2 i months. 


Fall — 


2* " 


Winter - 


- 3J " 




Wages of Teachers. 


Summer 


— $24 per month. 


Fall — 


$24 " " 


Winter - 


— $33 " " 



The summer and fall terms were under the care of Miss 
Emma Wetherbee. She had never taught before, except a pri- 
vate school of a few weeks in the same neighborhood. These 
schools were not as successful as they would have been had the 
teacher possessed more accurate acquirements and the advant- 
ages of experience by which she had profited. There was a 
want of confidence on the part of the pupils, manifest at the ex- 
amination of the fall term. Miss Dutton, who had charge of 
the winter term, had had experience in teaching, and was more 
successful. She gave the school a good start in the right direc- 
tion. She infused not a* little of her own earnestness into her 
pupils, and many of them became very much interested in the 
studies pursued, and consequently made marked improvement. 



44 

Roll of Honor. 

The following scholars have been neither absent nor tardy 
for 

Three Terms — 

Two Terms — Susie A. Wetherbee. 

One Term — Emma Perkins, Amelia F. Perkins, Lizzie M. 
Perkins, Hattie A. Harris, Elvira S. G-iles. Sarah F. Robbins, 
Roswell Wetherbee. 



SOUTHEAST SCHOOL. 

Teachers. 
Summer and Fall — Miss Martha T. Whitcomb. 
Winter— " Ellen 0. Clark. 

Whole Number of Scholars. 

Summer and Fall — 25; average, 18. 
Winter— 31; " 27. 

Length of School. 

Summer and Fall — 4J months. 
Winter— 3 J " 

Wages of Teachers. 

Summer and Fall — $26 per month. 
Winter— $32 " " 

This school though interrupted in the Summer by a contagious 
disease in the vicinity, made good advancement in all the terms. 
Both teachers employed seemed to understand their work, and 
heartily to engage in it. Five scholars have attended this school 
from Concord, and seven from Sudbury. We were notified by 
the Committee of Concord that they had made ample provision 
for the education of their scholars in their own town, and should 
object to paying for their schooling in Acton. We were also 



45 

informed that the town of Sudbury had declined to render com- 
pensation for the schooling of those from that town. We did 
not, however, refuse them admission to the school. One of the 
parents in Sudbury at least, has expressed a willingness to pay 
a reasonable sum for the privileges enjoyed in this school, and 
this may be the case with others. It would relieve the commit- 
tee from some embarrassment if this matter could be amicably 
adjusted by the towns interested. 

Roll of Honor. 

The following scholars have been neither absent nor tardy 
for 

Three Terms — Lester N. Fletcher. 

Two Terms — 

One Term — Winnie Dole, Etta Johnson, John H. Dawson, 
E. Eddy Fletcher, Walter Chaffin. 

Acton, March, 1868. 

E. DAVIS, Chairman. 

0. W. Mead, 
John Fletcher, 2d, 
Calvin Harris, 
Isaac T. Flagg, 
Charles Little, 
Luther Piper, 

School Committee. 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 

Amount of money raised by the town for School 

purposes, for 1867-8 - * - - $2,325 00 

Income from the State School Fund =■ - - 164 84 



Total) for School purposes - - - $2,489 84 



46 

Divided as follows, viz: Centre, $450.45; West, $645.10; 
South, $645.10; North, $244.68; East, $255.82; South- 
East, $244.67. 

Number of children reported by the assessors be- 
tween the ages of 5 and 15 - - - 302 

Number attending school in the year under 5 - 4 

Number attending school in the year, 15 and over 89 

Number of different scholars of all ages who have 

attended school in town in the year - - - 427* 

In the Centre, 90; West, 113; South, 127; North, 
21 ; East, 42 ; South East, 34*. 

Sum appropriated by the town for each scholar 

reported by the assessors .... $7 70 

Whole sum of money used for School purposes di- 
vided by the whole number of scholars who have 
attended school in the year - - - - $5 83 

For amount expended in repairs of school buildings, 
see Selectmen's Report, p. 3. 

* Including 5 from Concord and 7 from Sudbury. 



47 



FINANCIAL 



CENTRE SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 



Amount of teachers' wages, 
Paid for fuel, 
Incidentals, 
Deficiency last year, 
Balance to new account, 



$450 45 



$414 00 


22 


09 


• 1 


05 


1 


53 


11 


78 



$450 45 



$450 45 
Charles Little, Committee. 



WEST SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 



Amount of teachers' wages, 

Paid for fuel, 

Care of school-room, 

Sundries, 

Balance to new account, 



$645 


10 


1 


81 


$588 00 


43 


97 


7 


00 


4 


30 


3 


64 



$646 91 



$646 91 
O. W. Mead, Committee. 



SOUTH SCHOOLS. 



Appropriation, 
^Balance from last year, 

Amount of teachers' wages, 
Paid for fuel, 

Care of school-room and fires, 
Balance to new account, 



$645 


10 


2 


63 


$586 75 


34 


52 


8 


25 


18 


21 



$647 73 



$647 73 



Luther Piper, Committee. 



48 
NORTH SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 

Amount of teachers' wages, 

Paid for fuel, 

Incidentals, 

Balance to new account, 



$244 68 
1 59 


$213 50 

16 00 

5 53 

11 24 



$246 27 



$246 27 
Isaac T. Flagg, Committee. 



EAST SCHOOL. 

Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 



Amount of teachers' wages, 

Paid for fuel, 

Balance to new account. 



$255 82 
3 82 


$235 50 
16 50 

7 64 



$259 64 



$259 64 
Calvin Harris, Committee. 



SOUTHEAST SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 

Amount of teachers' wages, 

Paid for fuel, 

Care of school-room and fires, 



Deficiency this year, 



$244 67 
2 00 


$221 

20 

6 


00 
00 
00 


$247 


00 
33 



$246 67 



$246 67 
John Fletcher, Committee. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



SELECTMEN AND OTHER OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON, 

FROM FEB. 26, 1868, TO FEB. 26-, 1869, 



INCLUDING THE 



Marriages, Births and Deaths in 1868. 



ALSO, THE 



HEPORT OF THE SCHOOL-COMMITTEE, 



CONCORD : 

PRINTED BY BENJAMIN TOLMAN. 

1869. 



S E E.E C T M E X ' S R E P R T 



Receipts. 
Amount received, $16,880 94 



EXPENDITURES. 



Support of Schools. 

Paid L. W. Stevens, for West school, 
L. W. Piper, for South do., 
Charles Little, for Centre do., 
George Wilde, for South-east do., 
Isaac T. Flagg, for North do., 
Calvin Harris, for East do., 



SG38 


16 








638 


16 








445 £0 








242 


05 








242 


05 








253 


07 












$2 


.450 


09 



Repairs of School-Houses. 

Paid George Wilde, for shingling South-east 

school-house, $70 94 

Do., for repairs on South-east school- 
house, 2 75 

Do., for chair, broom, pail and dipper, 1 92 

Do., for crayons and book, 77 

L. W. Piper, for repairs on South school- 
house, 4 51 

Do., for chair, brooms, pails, crayons and 
dipper, 4 97 

L. W. Stevens, for repairs on West school- 
house, 3 10 

Do., for stove for West school-house, 14 00 

Do., for brooms, crayons, &c, 3 75 

Calvin Harris, for repairs on East school- 
house, 4 05 

Charles Little, for repairs on Centre school- 
house, 12 50 

Do., for brooms, crayons, &c, 3 50 

Isaac T. Flagg, for repairs on North school- 
house, 15 

Do., for pail, dipper and crayons, 1 40 

8128 31 



Books and Printing. # 

Paid Benj. Tolman, for printing warrants, $7 50 

" " " " Selectmen's 

report, 16 50 

Do., for printing Selectmen's, Town 
Clerk's, and School-Committee's reports, 92 12 

Do., for printing Teachers' cards, 10 00 

Do., for printing Rules for the protection 
of school-houses, 

William D. Tuttle, for Collector's book, 

L. W. Piper, for teachers' books, 

for printing road notices, 



5 


00 


1 


00 


3 


33 


3 


00 



Roads and Bridges. 

Paid Daniel Tuttle, for labor on road, 

Benjamin Hapgoocl, for breaking roads, 
Alonzo Tuttle, " " " 

Francis Hay ward, " " " 

Charles F. Richardson " " 

Barzillia H. Lawrence, " " 

Frank Hosmer, " " 

John F. Blood, " " 

" " " for repairing sluice, 
Andrew Hapgood, for breaking roads, 
Israel H. Giles, " " " 

Luke J. Robbins, " " " 

Francis Kinsley, for repairing sluice in 

South Acton, 
Daniel L. Veazey, for repairing sluice on 

Lowell road, 
Ambrose Heald, teaming stone for same, 
Cyrus Fletcher, for lumber for railing 

bridges, 
Cyrus Fletcher, for nails and labor on 

bridges, 
W. E. Faulkner, for breaking roads, 
Joel H. Conant, for labor on the road, 
Luther Billings, for breaking roads, 
Tilley Robbins, for labor on the road, 
For lumber for Powder Mill Bridges, 
For labor and nails for " " 
Daniel' Wetherbee, for building road from 

the Turnpike to near his house, 



$10 


95 


6 


40 


44 87 


9 


40 


8 


00 


15 


40 


2 


40 


6 


30 


7 


10 


19 


00 


4 


30 


19 


40 


17 


05 


30 


00 


6 


00 


76 


01 


23 


90 


12 


37 


7 


10 


19 


20 


2 


20 


196 


32 


28 


30 


50 00 



$621 



Highway Surveyors. 

Paid Barzillia H. Lawrence, 
Daniel Fletcher, 
Daniel Tuttle, 
John F. Blood, 
E. F. Fuller, 
L. W. Piper, 
A. L. Tuttle, 
Daniel Harris, 
W. H. Reed, 
Charles Wheeler, 
Charles Robbins, 
Obed A. Symonds, 
David M. Handley, 

Silas Conant and J. E. Billings, for Benjamin 
Hapgood, 



129 


80 


62 49 


50 


00 


19 


90 


108 


15 


40 83 


28 


05 


68 


42 


82 


91 


60 30 


19 


50 


36 


60 


33 


77 


21 


90 



Roads by Order of County Commissioners. 

Paid Simon Tuttle, for repairing and building 

road from the centre of the town to the 

Cemetery, $500 00 

Francis Kinsley, for repairing road near 
the house of J. K. Putney, 300 00 

John Grimes, for repairing road near El- 
bridge Robbins' saw-mill, 200 00 

Thomas Moore, for repairing road near 
Concord line, 150 00 

J. E. Billings, for repairing road near the 
houses of Luther Davis, Jonathan 
Wheeler, Charles Robbins, Geo. Keyes, 
and near the Centre Cemetery, 169 59 

Daniel Harris, for material and labor 
railing the road near Elbridge Robbins' 
saw-mill, 96 65 

Daniel Harris, for widening sluice, 7 00 

" " " ditching for the same, 1 50 

" " " repairing road near the 

house of J. E. Billings, 44 68 

Luke Smith, for building and repairing 
bridges near Elbridge Robbins' saw-mill, 1 70 00 

Do., for blasting and teaming ledge near 
the house of S. F. Hosmer, 42 18 

Henry M. Smith, for Dry Bridge, 100 00 



$762 62 



$1,781 60 



Discount and Abatement on Taxes. 

Paid John E. Cutter, for discount on taxes 

for 1868, $475 59 

John E. Cutter, for abatement of taxes 

for 1867, 86 56 



$562 15 



Appropriations for Soldiers and Families. 
Paid Soldiers, for May Drill and Fall Encamp- 



ment, 
Alson R. Sumner, 
Hiram W. Wetherbee, 
Rebecca C. Wright, 
Hattie W. Wilder, 
Rebecca Bigelow, 


$1,590 90 
27 00 
18 00 
85 33 
96 00 
96 00 







Support of Poor. 

Paid For medical attendance and supplies for 

Mrs. Murphy, 
Express on Rufus Tenny's trunk, 
A. Farrar, expenses to Westboro', for Geo. 

Bullard, 
Mrs. N. F. Haynes, for supplies, 
Coffin and robe for child, 
Dr. French, attending Haynes' family, 
Sarah B. Childs, for fuel, 
Journey to Maiden, respecting Haynes 

family, 
for assistance rendered travellers, 
" support and burial of Asa Oliver, 
" George W. Robbins, at Reform School, 



$13 50 




50 


2 


80 


34 


62 


10 00 


10 00 


16 


00 


3 


00 


5 


75 


48 


32 


13 


00 



$157 49 



Interest on Notes. 

Paid Augustine Conant, interest, $240 00 

James E. Billings, " 131 47 

Cyrus Conant, " 120 00 

Frederick Rouillard, " 102 00 

David M. Handley, " 102 00 



Paid Daniel Harris, 


interest, 


48 32 


Joel Ilauscomb, 


u 


40 80 


Lydia R. Keys, 


a 


36 00 


John R. Whitcomb, 


« 


30 00 


Calvin Harris, 


(( 


24 00 


James A. Billings, 


a 


12 00 


Isaac T. Flagg, 


u 


6 00 







$892 59 



Town Officers. 

Paid Rev. Edwin Davis, for examining teach- 
ers, superintending schools, and mak- 
ing report, $85 00 
William D. Tuttle, for taking inventory, 



copying and making taxes, 


50 00 


W. D. Tuttle, for services as Town-Clerk, 


25 00 


Elisha H. Cutler, for taking inventory 




and making taxes, 


25 00 


Luther R. Forbush, for taking inventory 




and making taxes, 


25 00 


J. E. Cutter, for collecting taxes, 


80 00 


James E. Billings, for services as Select- 




man, 


36 00 


Jonas K. Putney, do., do., 


14 50 


J. K. W. Wetherbee, do., do., 


20 00 


Town Committee, for expenses incurred 




in opposing the annexation of West 




Acton to Boxboro', 1,49 




$1,859 49 


Miscellaneous Expenses. 




Paid James Tuttle, for rent of school-room, 


$50 00 


Cutler Brothers, " " " 


50 00 


John E. Cutter, for summoning thirty 




persons to take the oath of office, 


3 75 


Geo. W. Sawyer, for taking care of town clock, 


10 00 


" " " cleaning clock, 


1 50 


" " " 20 galls, oil for Town Hall, 


10 70 


" " " coal, 


9 84 


" " " eight chimneys, 


1 00 


" " " washing floor, 


3 00 


" u " one broom, 


50 


" " " opening T.Hall 37 times, 


27 75 


" " " tolling bell for ten deaths, 


2 00 



8 



Paid N. S. Faulkner, for tolling bell for 17 deaths 

in 1867-8, 3 40 

H.J. Hapgood, for tolling bell for 5 deaths, 1 00 
Cyrus Fletcher, for attending 21 funerals 

with hearse, 52 50 

Do., for recording and making return to 

Town-Clerk, of 32 deaths, 3 20 

William D. Tuttle, for journey to Sud- 
bury, to make out election return of 
Representative, 
Do., for recording 16 marriages, 
Do., " " 31 deaths, 

Do., " collecting and recording 33 births, 
Do., for recasting grade of road from Ac- 
ton Centre to Cemetery, 
for express, postage and stationery, 
' Horse-cart for Town Farm, 
' Hay-wagon " " " 
4 paper hangings for Almshouse, 
4 whitewashing " 

' nails for shingling " 

' moving logs from highway near Francis 
Bobbins' saw-mill, 



2 


50 


2 


40 


5 


10 


9 


90 


5 


00 


9 


72 


67 


00 


19 


50 


3 


54 


3 


50 


2 


47 


5 00 



Cemetery Expenses. 
Paid Charles Hastings, for West Cemetery, 



CONDITION OF THE TREASURY, FEB. 26, 1869. 



State Tax for 1868, 
County Tax for 1868, 
Town Grant for 1868, 
Town Grant for Schools, 
Town Grant for Highways, 
Highway Deficiencies, 
Overlay on Taxes, 
Militia Bounty, 
Corporation Tax, 
State Aid to Jan. 1st, 1868, 



. 26, 1868, 


$3,658 19 




1,840 00 




848 55 




3,500 00 




2,325 00 




900 00 




88 04 




175 22 




1,565 50 




868 28 




613 00 



State School Fund, 

Liquor Licenses, 

Liquor Tax, 

Pedlers' License, 

School money from town of Stow, 

Use of Town-Hall, 

From town of Lincoln, for support and burial 

of Asa Oliver, 
Received from Town Farm, 



134 


09 




125 


00 




11 


62 , 




• 6 


00 




2 


54 




54 


00 




[ 

48 


32 




123 


59 






$16,886 


94 



Expenditures. 

For Support of Schools, $2,459 09 
Repairs on School-houses, 128 31 
Books and Printing, 138 45 
Roads and Bridges, 621 97 
Highway Surveyors, 762 62 
Roads, as per order Count}^ Commis- 
sioners, 1,781 60 
Discount and Abatement on Taxes, 562 15 
Appropriation for Soldiers and Families, 1,913 23 
Support of Poor, 157 49 
Interest on Notes, 892 59 
Town Officers, 1,859 49 
Miscellaneous Expenses, 365 77 
Cemetery Expenses, 25 00 
State Tax, 1,840 00 
County Tax, " 848 55 



$14,356 31 



Balance in the Treasury, Feb. 26, 1869, $2,530 63 



Financial Condition of the Town, Feb. 26, 1869. 
Dr. 
Tobalancedueasperreport,Feb.26, 1869, $2,530 63 
Amount due from State, for aid furnished 

soldiers and their families, 407 00 

Amount due from the State for rent of 

Armory, 150 00 

$3,087 63 



10 

Amount Due on Notes. 



Cr. 
By Cash of Ebenezer Conant, 
Joel Hauscom, 
Augustine Conant, 
David M. Handley, 
John R. Whitcomb, 
James A. Billings, 
Calvin Harris, 
Lydia R. Keyes, 
Isaac T. Flagg, 
Daniel Harris, 
James E. Billings, 
Frederick Rouillard, 



$2,058 00 
700 40 


4,116 
1,745 


00 
90 


536 


50 


202 


60 


202 


60' 


627 


60 


105 


50 


840 


86 


2,237 57 
1,778 10 

$15,151 



Balance against the Town, Feb. 26, 1869, 
without including the balance due as 
per Overseers' Report for 1869, or a 
balance of about $550, due for re- 
pairing roads, as per order of the 
County Commissioners, $12,064 00 



James E. Billings,- "i Selectmen 
Jonas K. Putney, > of 
J. K. W. Wethehbee, ) Actons 



Acton, February 26, 1869. 



REPORT OF THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES, 

AT THE 

ALMSHOUSE IN ACTON, 

For the Year Ending April 1st, 1869. 



Articles on Hand April 1st, 1869. 

13 cows, $880.00 ; 1 horse, 250.00 ; 6 tons hay, 108.00, $1,238 00 
28 bus. oats, 21.00 ; 60 bus. corn, 66.00 ; 1 shote, 30.00, 117 00 
23 fowls, 1725 : 28 M. skewers, 21.00 ; 50 lbs. ham, 9.00, 47 25 
125 lbs. pork, 22.50 ; 3 bbls. soap, 15.00 ; 2 bbls. apples, 7.00, 44 50 
50 lbs. soap-grease, 3.00 ; 80 lbs. lard, 16.00 ; pickles, 1.00, 20 00 
10 bus. potatoes, 8.00 ; 18 do. ashes, 3.60 ; 1-2 lb. tea, .60, 12 20 
lot skewer timber, 2.00 ; 12 lbs. apples, 1.20 ; 25 lbs. 

candles, 4.50, 7 70 



$1,486 65 



Receipts. 

For milk, $1,172,86 ; apples, 190.87 ; sweet corn, 1.50, 
cow, 42.00 ; calves, 47.25 ; pork, 20.67, 
potatoes, 27.00 ; berries, 32.73 ; eggs, 8.74, 
skewers, 51.25; grapes, 1.68; squashes, 1.00, 
poultry, 4.10 ; use of wagon, 3.50, 
keeping pedler, .50 ; pickles, .25, 
iron, .86, keeping colt, 8.40, 



Cash from Town Treasury, 



$1,365 


23 


109 


92 


68 


47 


53 


93 


7 


60 




75 


9 


26 


$1,615 16 


86 


50 


$1,701 


66 



12 



Expenditures. 
For cows, $253.00 ; shotes, 30.75 ; potatoes, 28.65, $312 40 

meal, 29.23 ; rice meal, 95.36 ; oil meal and 

shorts, 221.02, 345 61 

grinding grain, 6.66 ; sugar, 26.42 ; butter, 84.50, 117 58 
fish, 2L07; beef, 92.98; flour, 82.20, 196 25 

cheese, 21.97; tallow, 3.24; beans, 9.39, 34 60 

molasses, 31.15; tobacco, 12.47; bread, 3.89, 47 51 

clothing, 18.32 ; knives and forks, 2.62 ; oats, 9.00, 29 94 
tripe, 4.62; plaster Paris, 6.53 ; potash, 12.31, 23 46 

horse-cart, 67.00 ; hay-wagon, 19.50 ; boots and 

shoes, 12.12, 98 62 

blacksmith's bill, 11.68; barrels, 8.63; pasturing, 13.59, 33 90 
tea, 18.25 ; coffee, 7.07 ; salt, 7.65 ; oil, 3.70, 36 67 

super-phosphate, 16.89; tools, 28.50; spice, 2.94, 48 33 

expense to Boston, 9.15 ; grass-seed, 11.07, 20 22 

medicine, .25 ; tin- ware, 1.05 ; straw, .52 ; rope, .90, 2 72 
bridle, 5.00 ; tugs, 4.00 ; mending harness, .57, 9 57 

skewer timber, 3.75 ; filing saw, 30 ; soap, 1.30, 5 35 

pails, 1.75; ox-labor, 3.00; cream tartar, .80, 5 55 

making cider, 1.00 ; newspaper, 1.70 ; mason work, 1.50, 4 20 
butchering, .75 ; labor, 1.05 ; use of bull, 3.50 ; nails, .97, 6 27 
ink, .10 ; vinegar, 2.00 ; saltpetre, .06 ; starch, .29, 2 45 

matches, 1.30 ; rice, .39 ; saleratus, .50 ; stove polish .10, 2 29 
crockery, .40 ; snuff, .45 ; brush, .37 ; wicking, .43, 1 65 

brooms, 1.45 ; clothes pins, .08 ; flypaper, .25 ; glue .14, 1 92 
spider, .50; bucket, .45; raisins, 1.25, castings, 1.06, 3 26 
services of Mr. and Mrs. Abel Earrar, Jr., 360 00 

" James E. Billings, ■ 6 00 

" Jonas K. Putney, 6 00 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, 6 00 



$1,768 32 
Amount of inventory, April 1st, 1868, $1,455 96 

Interest on farm, 239 40 



$3,463 68 



Recapitulation. 

Amount of receipts, $1,701 QQ 

Amount of expenditures, 1,768 32 

Amount due from Town Treasury to balance account, $Q6 66 



13 



Total amount of expenditures, $1,768 32 

Amount of inventory April 1st, 1868, 1,455 96 

Interest on farm, 239 40 



Total amount of receipts, $1,615 16 

Amount of inventory April 1st, 1869, 1,486 65 



$3,463 68 



$3,101 81 



$361 87 
Expense of victualing foreigners, 17 20 



Total amount of supporting poor at Almshouse, $344 67 

Whole number of persons (exclusive of foreigners) supported in 
the Almshouse, 8 ; average number, 4 3-4 ; present number, 6 ; 
cost per week, $1.40. 



James E. Billings, \ Overseers 
Jonas K. Putney, > of 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, j Poor. 



Acton, April 1st, 1869. 






TOWN-CLERK'S REPORT. 



BIRTHS REGISTERED IN ACTON, IN 1868. 

No. Date of Birth. Name of Child. Parents' Names. 

I. Jan. 21, Florian W. Fiske, son of James W. and Maria Fiske. 
- 2. Feb. 2, Herbert Ernest Reed, son of George and Anna E. 

Reed. t 

3. Feb. 23, George F. Richardson, son of Edward F. and Frances 

H. Richardson. 

4. March 10, Joseph Chesson Parker, son of Edwin C. and 

Hannah H. Parker. 

5. March 23, Eugene Lazelle White, son of Abram and Marietta 

E. White. 

6. March 26, Mary Calanan, daughter of Daniel and Ellen 

Calanan. 

7. April 10, Hattie Belle Harris, daughter of Frank E. and M. 

Sophia Harris. 

8. May 2, Etta Augusta Tuttle, daughter of Alonzo L. and 

Ellen C. Tuttle. 

9. May 5, Fred Walter Gilmore, son of Walter A. and Emma A. 

Gilmore. 

10. May 5, Daniel McCarthy, son of Daniel and Mary McCarthy. 

II. May 23, Emma Elvira Fiske, daughter of Robert and Susan 

A. Fiske. 

12. May 27, William Schoular Randall, son of Freeman L. and 

Amelia A. Randall. 

13. June 1, Frank Emerson Wood, son of Winthrop E. and 

Lydia A. Wood. 

14. June 6, Arthur Bradford Davis, son of William B. and S. 

Maria Davis. 

15. June 8, Arthur Harris McDonnell, son of Albert and Tina 

McDonnell. 

16. June 10, Carrie Maria Dunn, daughter of Waldo G. and 

Fannie M. Dunn. 

17. June 18, James Roland Wetherbee, son of D. James and 

Augusta A. Wetherbee. 

18. June 21, Carlton Carroll Conant, son of Silas, Jr. and Cath- 

erine Conant. 

(14) 



15 



19. June 23, Ellen Elizabeth Lane, daughter of Morris and Mary- 

Lane. 

20. June 24, Josie Ida Tuttle, daughter of Joseph F. and Jennie 

E. Tuttle. 

21. Aug. 13, Martha Chandler Pratt, daughter of Windsor F. 

and Mary Pratt. 

22. Aug. 16, Minnie Gertrude Bassett, daughter of Joseph R. 

and Clara Bassett. 

23. Sept. 13, Eugene Lazelle Hall, son of Delette H. and Susan 

A. Hall. 

24. Oct. 4, Charles Carlton Taylor, son of Moses and Mary E. 

Taylor. 

25. Oct. 10, Ann Maria Coughlin, daughter of John and Mar- 

garet Coughlin. 

26. Oct. 15, Minnie H. Brooks, daughter of Henry and Harriet 

E. Brooks. 

27. Oct. 31, Ellen Raddin, daughter of Patrick and Hannah 

Raddin. 

28. Nov. 5, A daughter to Charles A. and Martha E. Crampton. 

29. Nov. 16, Margaret Paulina Schouler, daughter of William 

and Elizabeth Schouler. 

30. Nov. 17, Harry Grant Robbins, son of Luke J. and Mary 

W. Robbins. 

31-2. Nov. 22, John and James Dooley, twin children of Rich- 
ard and Johanna Dooley. 

33. Dec. 16, A daughter to E. A. and Nellie Albee. 



MARRIAGES RECORDED IN 1868. 

No. Date of Marriage. Names of the Parties. 

1. Jan. 1, Mr. Levi H. Robbins and Miss Mary C. Tuttle, both 

of Acton. 

2. Jan. 16, Mr. Aaron C. Handley and Miss Lydia W. Tuttle, 

both of Acton. 

3. Jan. 27, Mr. John A. Walker, of South Groton, and Miss 

Betsey Maria Whitcomb, of Boxbofough. 

4. March 25, Mr. Isaiah Reed and Mrs. Sarah Jane Davison 

both of Acton. 

5. May 3, Mr. Samuel J. Smith and Mrs. Lucy A. Chamberlain, 

both of Acton. 

6. April 22, Mr. William A. Ingham, of Lowell, and Miss 

Nancie H. Fletcher, of Acton. 

7. April 30, Mr. Horace R. Hosmer, and Miss Carrie H. Smith, 

both of Acton. 



16 



8. May 12, Mr. Stephen A. Oglesby, of Marion, and Miss Laura 

E. Durkee, of Acton. 

9. June 2, Mr. Edwin Newton and Miss Georgianna S. Clough, 

both of Acton, 

10. June 14, Mr. John Whitcomb, of Harvard, and Miss Hellen 

P. Tower, of Stow. 

11. July 11, Mr. William H. Brooks and Miss Lucy R. Stearns, 

both of Stow. 

12. Sept. 3, Mr. Charles J. Willis, of Acton, and Mrs. Mary A. 

McDowell, of Littleton. 

13. Sept. 5, Mr. Henry H. Hanscom and Miss Ora L. Jones, 

both of Acton. 

14. Nov. 8, Mr. Edwin R. Rouillard, of Boston, and Miss Eliza 

A. Harris, of Acton. 

15. Nov. 22, Mr. Charles H. Cash, and Miss Charlotte E. Davis, 

both of Acton. 

16. Dec. 2, Mr. Isaac G. Reed, of Acton, and Miss Jane Maria 

Broatch, of Middletown, Conn. 



DEATHS IN ACTON, IN 1868. 

No. bate of Death. Names of Deceased. 

1. Jan. 15, Mr. Maverick Wyman, aged 79y. 2m. 

2. Jan. 21, Widow Hannah Rouillard, aged 84y. 11m. 4d. 

3. Jan. 22, Mr. Nathan Buttrick, aged 81y. 4m. 18d. 

4. Jan. 26, Widow Sally Robbins, aged 81y. 

5. Jan. 26, Ana Sophia Jones, daughter of Elnathan, Jr., and 

Elizabeth Jones, aged 2y. 8m. 6d. 

6. Jan. 27, Mr. Aaron Chaffin, aged 76y. 4m. 24d. 

7. Feb. 7, Mr. Stevens Hayward, Esq., aged 81y. 11m. 28d. 

8. Feb. 23, Lizzie Etta Mellen, daughter of Benjamin and Lizzie 

Mellen. 

9. Feb. 18, Helen Lizzie Davis, daughter of William W> and 

Martha C. Davis, aged 3y. 8m. 14d k 

10. Feb. 29, Mr. William Conant, aged 58y. 3m. 

11. Mar. 2, Widow Nancy Sweatt, aged 78y. 8m. 

12. Mar. 8, Mr^Simeon Conant, aged 77y. 8m. I6d. 

13. Apr. 7, Mrs. Susan A. Mead, wife of Oliver W. Mead, aged 

28y. 10m. 17d. 

14. Apr. 10, Mr. Asa Oliver, aged 59y. 

15. Apr. 11, Mr. John Brown, aged 54y. 8m. 

16. Apr. 20, Mr. Jonathan B. Davis, aged 78y. 5m. 22d. 

17. Apr. 22, Widow Nancy Sprague, aged 70y. 8m. 

18. June 19, Nellie J. Fletcher, aged 27y. 2m. 



17 



19. July 14, Mr. Michael Shurrey, aged 66y. 

20. July 17, At Hamilton, Mo., Mr. Emory A. Symonds, aged 

22y. lm. 17d. 

21. Aug. 4, Mr. Calvin Taylor, aged 74y. 6m. 

22. Sept. 2, Mrs. Sarah Wild, wife of Mr. Joseph Wild, aged 

81y. 

23. Oct. 19, Mrs. Harriet E. Brooks, wife of Henry Brooks, 

aged 33y. 

24. Oct. 22, Minnie II. Brooks, daughter of Henry and Harriet 

E. Brooks, aged 7d. 

25. Oct. 26, Mr. John Cobleigh, aged 74y. 

.26. Oct. 28, Mr. John Davey, aged 80y. 4m. 7d. 

27. Nov. 16, George Farwell Richardson, son of Edward F. and 

Frances H. Richardson, aged 8m. 21d. 

28. Dec. 22, Hattie M. Fuller, aged 27y. 

29. Dec. 30, Mr. Luther Davis, aged 81y. 3m. 

30. Sept. 10, At Stoneham, Mr. Elijah C. Brown, aged 59y. 8m. 

lOd. 

31. March 20, At Lowell, Mrs. Nancy Parker, wife of Elbridge 

Gr. Parker, aged 41y. 9m. 20d. 

William D. Tuttle, Town-Clerk. 
Acton, March 20, 1869. 



REPORT OF CEMETERY-COMMITTEE. 



WEST CEMETERY. 
Charles Hastings, Superintendent. 



Dr. 

Cash rec'd for 4 lots, 

" grading 3 lots, 
" Tablet, 
" Loam sold, 
'• Hay " 
of Dr. Green (donation), 
" Town-Treasurer, 



Cr. 



Cash paid for 11 1-2 days' labor, 
" " " teaming, 
" " " fencing, 
" due Committee March 1, 1868, 



m 



hands March 1, 1869, 



$4 00 

2 27 
69 

3 50 
1 00 

10 00 
25 00 



$28 


75 


4 


25 




75 


1 


75 


10 


96 



$46 46 



$46 46 



Acton, March 1, 1869. 



William D. Tuttle, . 
Samuel Hosmer, 



Charles Hastings 



:tle, \ 
igs, j 



Committee. 



(18) 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL-COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON, 



FOR THE 



SCHOOL-YEAR 1868-9. 



CONCORD: 

PRINTED BY BENJAMIN TOLMAN. 

1869. 



REPORT. 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

Your School-Committee feel able to report the condition 
of our schools during the year, as on the whole, prosperous. 
We say this, although several of our teachers have partially 
or wholly failed, and the best of them would be the first to 
acknowledge their own distance from perfection. 

Yet of the twenty-one teachers employed in town during 
the year, at least two-thirds should be classed as excellent 
and successful, and at least one third of the whole number 
deserve still higher praise. When we consider the combina- 
tion of qualities necessary to make a first-rate teacher, it will 
seem a matter for congratulation that so large a proportion 
of ours have been more than excellent. Four of the schools 
have not changed teachers during the year, so that seventeen 
teachers have been employed for seven schools. Some 
changes are, of course, unavoidable, as good teachers leave 
the profession, or those have been employed who are found 
to be ill adapted to their work. But the advantage to a 
school of having a good permanent teacher has been abund- 
antly demonstrated, and the Committee would make every 
effort to retain those who prove themselves well fitted for 
their places. 

We have spoken of teachers as if the success or failure of 
a school rested with them entirely, but we do not forget the 
aid that may be given in either direction by parents and 



pupils. A teacher of experience and tact, with good physical 
health and a willingness to work, will have a good school in 
the face of opposition and •discouragement. On the other 
hand a young teacher, or one too modest to properly govern 
a school, may yet succeed well, if she can have the aid and 
sympathy of all those interested in the welfare of the school. 
Very few who have not tried it appreciate the amount of hard 
work required in one of our common schools. We speak, of 
course, of a teacher who feels her responsibility, and does all 
in her power to benefit her pupils. 

Unless the mind of the teacher is active and wide awake, 
the scholars are sure to be dull and listless. If the teacher 
passes lightly over the hard places in the lessons, the scholars 
will do no better. Then the teacher has need of ready tact 
and the quickest perception to govern well the children with 
differing temperaments and different home training. She 
must be patient with the dull ones, sharp to look after the 
roguish, and Avatchful lest she " show partiality" to the bright 
and the docile. 

No wonder that the inexperienced teacher should some- 
times think the task too hard — that she should become con- 
fused and disheartened — then give up trying to have things 
right, and only go the round of daily duties with as little 
trouble as possible. It is then that visits to the school by 
the parents, and encouraging words can do great good. 
The teacher sees that some one takes an interest in the school — 
that she will receive the reward of praise and gratitude if it 
is Reserved, and will not so easily endure idleness and dis- 
order, when there are others to observe it beside herself. 

In the statistical table subjoined, we have added a column 
showing the number of visits by parents and others, exclud- 
ing the Superintendent's visits, during each term. 

We should be sorry to state how large a proportion of 
those small numbers represent children, and persons out of 
the district. We respectfully urge parents to be more atten- 



tive to this matter, and to visit their schools at least once 
every term. They will certainly find their own interest in 
the school increased, as well as that of their children, and, 
having seen for themselves, will not be obliged to depend 
upon " they say" for a knowledge of what is done in the 
school-room. Seeing too, the difficult work of the teacher, 
they will be more inclined to sympathize with, and help her. 

As directed by vote of the town last year, the Committee 
had reprinted the * * Rules for the preservation of School- 
Houses," and posted copies in every school. In some in- 
stances, teachers have neglected to fulfil strictly their re- 
quirements, but we think that less injury has been done this 
year, than in some former years. 

The only change in text-books made during the year has 
been the substitution of Guyot's for Cornell's series of 
Geographies. The latter had been a long time in use in our 
schools, and some parts of the old edition were absolutely 
worthless. The new edition was an improvement, but so 
different from the old as to make different classes in the same 
grade almost a necessity. Some change was demanded and 
as Prof. Guyot's series seemed to the Committee superior to 
any other, it was introduced at the beginning of the school 
year. 

The method of teaching the subject in the new book was 
so different from that to which both teachers and scholars had 
been accustomed that at first the change was not agreeable to 
all. But, after one year's trial the Committee believe the 
•experiment fully justified, and that we have only begun to 
realize the good results coming from the change. 

We have in Guyot's books ' ' map questions sufficient to 
-compel a careful examination of the map — a method of map- 
drawing, furnishing to every pupil, irrespective of any special 
taste for drawing, the means of making an accurate map " — 
and a description of the physical features of the various coun- 
tries at once clear, picturesque and exhaustive. 



It is the design of Prof. Guyot that map-drawing should 
hold a prominent place in Geographical teaching, and, in some 
of our schools, good progress has been made in that direc- 
tion. It is confidently expected that more will be done as* 
our teachers become better acquainted with the methods so 
fully described in their text-books. 

We have sadly felt the need of wall maps, and it is the in- 
tention of the Committee to supply the want as soon as pos- 
sible. It seems to us that we cannot afford to leave our 
school-rooms destitute of such constant and impressive, 
though silent teachers. Two of the school-houses, the North 
and East, retain their sets of Fowle's Outline Maps, nearly 
or quite complete. In the others, no vestige remains, though 
it is presumed that all were supplied at the same time. This 
fact is no encouragement for furnishing new ones, but it is 
hoped that such careless destruction rqay be prevented in the 
future, especially if the maps are in constant use, and regard- 
ed as helps by the scholar. This appears to be the case in 
the two districts mentioned, and what can be done there, is 
not impossible in other districts. 

The same reason that required a change in Geographies 
renders some change in Readers necessary — namely, a new 
edition, largely introduced into the schools, with different 
paging and some new matter. In this case we deem it the 
better plan to introduce entirely new books, as the old ones 
have become very familiar from long use, and the less ad- 
vanced classes, especially, would feel more interest in some- 
thing new. A better classification also might be accom- 
plished, as many scholars, anxious for some change 7 have 
been using books altogether above them. 



Centre School. 

In the higher department the teacher for the summer and 
fall terms was Miss C. E. Lawrence, who had before earned 



a high reputation In the district, by teaching well for several 
terms in. the primary department. She proved herself 
equally active and capable in the more advanced school. She 
was willing to work hard herself and so incited her scholars 
to diligence. At the examination the school appeared to be 
perfectly regulated, and in good working order. All the 
clashes showed thorough instruction and good progress. The 
pieces selected for recitation were excellent and well recited. 

Mr. Luther Conant took charge of the winter term, and 
entered upon his duties with his accustomed energy. His 
well-known success as a teacher makes any praise here super- 
fluous. He knows exactly what to do and how to do it in 
the best manner. The prevalence of scarlet fever in the 
neighborhood about the middle of the term, diminished the 
attendance very much and the school was closed from Jan. 
20th to Feb. 23d. Notwithstanding the interruption the 
term was a very profitable one to the scholars, and good pro- 
gress was made. 

Miss Ella F. Lawrence taught the primary department 
during the summer and fall, to the general satisfaction of the 
district. 

In the winter term Miss Etta Eouillard taught the first 
seven weeks, and Miss S- F. Wright the remaining three 
weeks. Both these teachers were beginners, and the school 
made less advancement than would have been expected under 
teachers of more experience. 



West School. 

'The higher department has had two superior teachers, and 
fully sustained its good reputation. * During the summer and 
fall Miss Emery continued to conduct the school with an 
amount of physical and mental vigor that few can equal. It 
was her aim to have her pupils understand thoroughly the 



subjects gone over, and to think for themselves. Her own 
energy and enthusiasm could not fail to stimulate tjie minds 
of her scholars, and it was a source of much regret to the 
Committee that other duties compelled her to resign her po- 
sition at the close of the fall term. We can only hope that 
she may be equally useful and successful in another sphere. 

Miss Conant succeeded her and made the winter term a 
pleasant and profitable one. She has had much experience 
as a teacher, is active and efficient. There are many good 
scholars in this school and the examination, which was well 
attended, was an occasion of much interest. The reading 
classes especially, showed excellent drill, and the readiness 
and clearness of the answers from all the classes gave evidence 
that no branch had been neglected. The dialogues, compo- 
sitions, and recitation of select pieces would have been called 
good in a High-School or Acadenty. At the close of the 
exercises the teacher received from her pupils two vases filled 
with beautiful flowers, a very pleasant evidence of mutual 
sympathy and co-operation. 

Intermediate Department. — Miss Whitcomb had charge of 
this division during the summer and fall. We knew that 
she was a well qualified teacher, with considerable experience 
and expected a superior school. In some departments of 
study our expectations were not disappointed. In others 
we thought her method of teaching defective. Still, fair pro- 
gress was made, and the examination was worthy of praise 
in many particulars. We noted an apparent " want of in- 
terest " on the part of the scholars, perhaps chargeable in some 
degree to their age, but indicating also a lack of earnestness 
and enthusiasm on the part of the teacher. 

The winter term was ©pened by Miss Hazelton, of Plym- 
outh, N. H., a teacher of some experience and thorough 
education. She worked hard, though almost discouragec 
from the first, for while she was well qualified to instruct* 



she lacked the requisite tact to govern such a school. Find- 
ing herself unable to make the term profitable, she resigned 
her place after one month, and was succeeded by Miss Dra- 
per. The general appearance of the school was at once im- 
proved, and satisfactory progress was made during the 
remainder of the term. The examination was well attended 
though the day was very stormy and the classes generally 
appeared very well. The recitation of select pieces, and 
dialogues gave a pleasant variety to the exercises. 

The primary school was a decided success. Miss Newhall 
begun the year, a young teacher, with no experience, but at 
once gave evidence of being well fitted for the work she had 
undertaken. The school was always found in good order, 
and the children occupied with something useful. Decided 
improvement was manifest at each examination, and the num- 
ber of pleased spectators present showed that the faithful 
teacher was not unappreciated. The school-room was un- 
comfortable and unsightly, but for all that it was a pleasant 
place to visit, for it was kept neat and tidy, and the occu- 
pants seemed always bright and happy. We hope Miss 
Newhall may continue long in the same school, for good 
teachers are nowhere more needed than, in the primary de- 
partments. 



South School. 

Miss Comstock has retained her place in the advanced sec- 
tion of this school throughout the year, and uninterrupted 
good progress has been made. The teacher insists upon 
exactness and thoroughness, so that comparatively little 
ground is gone over, but the scholars do more studying than 
in most schools where longer lessons are given, and the 
examinations showed that the work undertaken had been 
well accomplished. We marked several of the recitations at 



10 

the last examination as worthy of special praise, but will 
only mention the reading in concert by the whole school, 
and the gymnastic exercises with dumb-bells. We would 
like to see the latter in all of our schools. We take pleasure 
in adding, in behalf of the scholars, that they seemed equally 
interested with the teacher in making their school as nearly 
perfect as possible. 

In the Intermediate department Miss Hapgood has proved 
herself a competent and faithful teacher. Her constant kind- 
ness and gentleness assured her scholars that she was inter- 
ested in their welfare, and in return, they regarded her with 
gratitude and affection. We sometimes thought that she 
showed too much tolerance of heedlessness both in recitation 
and deportment, for the best good of her school, and we often 
felt a lack of life and enthusiasm in both teacher and pupils. 
But there was abundant evidence of good teaching at each 
examination, and the school made steady progress. 

The Primary department has had four teachers, and, of 
course, has been less a success than the other divisions. The 
teacher in the summer was a novice in the art. Though well 
qualified to instruct, and willing to work, she did not mani- 
fest the quiet persistence necessary to insure order and dili- 
gence in such a difficult school, so the work of teaching 
became a hard task for her, and the term a less profitable 
one for the scholars. 

Miss Faulkner taught in the fall with her accustomed suc- 
cess. Her tact and experience, aided by unflagging industry, 
seemed to transform the disorderly and idle children into 
enthusiastic learners. All of her instruction was excellent, 
and the improvement of the school all that could be desired. 
We would especially mention with praise a thorough and con- 
tinuous drill in pronunciation and articulation, and also the 
requirement that the scholar should give a clear and complete 
answer to every question. Too many of our teachers are 
negligent in this respect, accepting from the scholar a word 



11 

or two, and finishing the sentence themselves, or leaving it 
incomplete. It is possible, and very important to form good 
habits in this regard in the Primary-School, for clear expres- 
sion and clear thinking are likely to go together. 

Miss Ballou, a teacher of experience and many excellent 
qualifications, begun the winter term, but her quiet and gentle 
ways were not adapted to the school, and she resigned dur- 
ing the fourth week. She was followed by Miss Buffum, of 
Xorth Berwick, Me., who had better success and finished the 
term quite profitably. 



South-East School. 

Miss Clark continued in charge of this school through 
the summer and fall. \Ve could find much to praise in her 
management. The room was always neatly kept, and the 
scholars quiet and orderly ; the lessons were well studied, 
and generally recited correctly. In these respects her school 
was almost a model. But the more important part of her 
duties — namely, the teaching — was less perfectly performed. 
She was satisfied to ask just the questions in the book, or to 
listen, while the reading classes went through the prescribed 
lessons, so there was evident at examination a lack of anima- 
tion and of thorough drill, though the deportment of the 
scholars was entirely satisfactory. 

In the winter, the teacher was a much better instructress, 
but hardly as efficient as a disciplinarian. We had nothing 
to complain of however in the way of order, and the school 
made good progress. At the examination we were especially 
pleased w T ith the Geography classes. Maps had been drawn 
Ijy the pupils on the blackboard — ^very good maps too — and 
from them the countries were described in an interesting and 
thorough manner. The classes in Reading and Arithmetic 
also gave evidence of good instruction. 



12 

East School. 

The summer and fall terms were again under the care of 
Miss Emma Wetherbee. She had the advantage of previous 
experience in the same school, and showed also a tact and 
efficiency in governing that many good teachers do not pos- 
sess. The school could always be commended for good 
behavior, and the recitations generally were creditable to 
both teacher and pupils. At the examination the scholars 
were especially prajsed for the interest they exhibited, and 
for the promptness and distinctness of their answers. 

The teacher for the winter term was Miss Hattie A. Bruce, 
of Littleton. She seemed to understand her work, and 
secured in a good degree the approbation of both parents 
and scholars. The examination was well attended, and, in 
many respects excellent. The order seemed hardly as per- 
fect as under the former teacher, but there was evidence of 
improvement in the studies pursued. 



North School. 
Mrs. Harris continued in this school throughout the year, 
and fully sustained her previous reputation. Higher praise 
than this we could hardly give, as she has been long known 
as one of our best teachers. The scholars are kept actively 
at work and have good thorough instruction in all depart- 
ments of study. The high standing and proficiency of this 
school are largely due to the labors of Mrs. Harris. At the 
last examination her scholars expressed their appreciation of 
her worth by an appropriate present. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Chas. Little, Chairman. L. W. Piper, 
Calvin Harris, L. W. Stevens, 

Isaac T. Flagg, Geo. Wilde. 

Acton, March 25, 1869. 






FINANCIAL 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 

Amount of teachers' wages, 
Paid for fuel, 

Care of school-rooms and fires, 
Balance to new account, 



Centre 


School. 










$445 


60 






11 


78 


es, 


393 


25 






27 


25 


fires, 




5 


20 






31. 


68 



$457 38 



$457 38 
Charles Little, Committee. 



- West School. 

Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 


$638 16 
3 64 


Amount of teachers' wages, 
Paid for fuel, 

Care of school-rooms and fires, 
Balance to new account, 


$589 55 

41 87 

6 00 

4 38 



$641 80 



$641 80 
L. W. Stevens, Committee. 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 



South School. 


$638 16 
22 05 


3S, 

fires, 


$599 50 

42 25 

9 00 

9 46 



$660 21 



Amount of teachers' wages, 
Paid for fuel, 

Care of school-rooms and fires, 
Balance to new account, 

$660 21 

L. W. Piper, Committee. 
(13) 



14 



East School. 

Appropriation, 

Balance from last year, 


$253 07 
7 64 


Amount of teachers' wages, 
Paid for fuel, 

Care of school-rooms and fires, 
Balance to new account, 


$239 00 
15 75 

3 67 

2 29 



$260 71 



$260 71 
Calvin Harris, Committee. 



South-East School. 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 

Amount of teachers' wages, 
Paid for fuel, 

Care of school-room and fires, 
Balance to new account, 



$242 05 
13 00 


$207 00 

20 00 

6 00 

22 05 



$255 05 



$255 05 
George Wilde, Committee. 



North School. 

Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 


$242 05 
11 24 


Amount of teachers' wages, 

Paid for fuel, 

Care of school-room and fires, 

Desk book, 

Balance to new account, 


$229 50 

16 00 

4 00 

90 

2 89 



$253 29 



$253 29 
Isaac T. Flagg, Committee. 



Amount of money raised by town, $2,325 00 

Income from the State School Fund, 134 09 



Total for School purposes, $2,459 09 



15 



No. of children reported by Assessors between the ages 

of five and fifteen, 308 



Sinn appropriated by the town for each scholar report- 
ed by Assessors, $7 54 



ROLL OF HONOR. 



CESTUE. HIGHER. 



Those who have been 
neither absent or tar- 
dy for three terms. 



Ada C. Davis, 
Susie Tuttle, 
Willie Jones. 



Those who have been 
neither absent or tar- 
day for two terms. 



Josie A. Forbush, 
Lizzie Taylor, 
Almeda Litchfield, 
Delia Stearns, 
Addie Tuttle, 
Sophia Fletcher, 
Herbert Blodgett. 



Those who have been 
neither absent or tar- 
day for one term. 



Eliza Wheeler, 
Ida M. Pike, 
Nellie Hauscom, 
Katie Kinsley, 
Clara Stearns, 
Jonathan Blodgett, 
Herbert Noyes, 
Waldo Hauscom > 
Willie Davis, 
John Roth. 



centre, primary. Lizzie Roth 



Jennie Berry, 
M. Etta Taylor, 
Ida Hale, 
Wilbur Fisk, 
Frank Fike. 



Rosie Jones,. 
Herbert Fiske, 
Willie Richardson, 
Lyman Tuttle, 
Willie Kinsley, 
Albert Sawyer, 
Eoswell Tuttle, 
Arthur Tuttle. 



WEST, HIGHEST. 



Maria Hastings, 
Annie C. Hastings. 



Ellen Blanchard, 
Carrie A. Jewett, 
Warren Fairbanks, 
Walter W. Hastings, 
Julie Mead. 



WEST, 
INTERMEDIATE. 



Nellie G. Hoar, 
Lizzie G. Rowell, 
Nellie F. Handley, 
Emma Stockwell, 
Lucie H. Hayward, 
Lilla A. Hayward, 
Lewis C. Hastings. 



Flora S. Davis, 
Emma C. Hall, 
Mary Hurley, 
Rose E. Arnold, 
Emma A. Mead, 
Frank S. Davis, 
Edwin E. Davis, 
G. Sumner Wright, 
George A. Gardner, 
Arthur W. Stevens, 
Horace Whitcomb, 
Charles Teel. 



WEST, PRIMARY. 



John S. Hoar, 
Austin E. Lawrence. 



Cornelia Hayward, 
Cordelia Hayward, 
Ella S. Teel, 
George Y. Hutchins, 
Alphonso Wyman. 



Cora M. Arnold, 
Susie C. Hayward, 
Laura Stockwell, 
Mary S. Cutler, 
Lottie E. Handley, 
Hattie M. Whitcomb, 
Delette Handley, 
Eddie Hayward., 
Crosby Hoar, 
Willie T. Mason, 
George V. Mead, 
Willie A. Teel, 
Wallace McDonald, 
Arthur W. Houghton 



17 



SOUTH, HIGHEST. 



Anna A. Tuttle. 



Mary A. Rynn, 
Frank II. Jones, ' 
Willie E. Wood, 
Danie F. Hayward. 



Charlie C. Laselle, 
Burton H. Butters, 
Jonathan P. Fletcher, 
Nelson H. Tenney, 
Nellie L. Tuttle, 
Sophia E. Symonds, 
Ellen L. Jones. 



SOUTH, 
INTERMEDIATE. 



Lucy A. Jones. 



Nellie Wilder, 
Nellie Hannon, 
Addie Jones, 
Mary Wonster, 
Nellie Tuttle, 
Frank Butters, 
Georgie A. Gates. 



Minnie Jones, 
Jennie Tuttle, 
Nellie Conant, 
Mary Davidson, 
Emma Billings, 
Emma Handley, 
Anna Law, 
Hattie Fletcher, 
Lizzie Fletcher, 
Willie Rynn, 
Eddie Conant, 
Charley Laselle, 
Anson Piper, 
Wilber Jones. 



south, primary. John Rynn 



James Hannon, 
Michael Hannon, 
Frank H. Bulette. 



Lizzie Richardson, 
Myrtie Richardson, 
Martha Jones, 
Nellie Dean, 
Usher Brown, 
Arthur Jones, 
Willie Warren, 
George W. Worster, 
Frank Haynes, 
Norman H. Davidson, 
John F. Angell. 



Susie A. Wetherbee. 



Hattie Harris, 
Sarah F. Bobbins, 
Amelia F. Perkins, 
Lizzie M. Perkins, 
Roswell Wetherbee. 



Nellie E. Batchelder, 
Susie A. Batchelder, 
Emma F. Estabrook, 
Ida R. Kstabrook, 
Frank Wetherbee, 
Butterfield Harris. 



south-east. 



Winnie Dole, 
Lester N. Fletcher. 



Isabella Dawson, 
Mary L. Fairbanks, 
Etta J. Johnson, 
Addie C.Jones, 
John Dawson, 
Albert N. Gates, 
George E. Gates. 



north. 



Julie Ina Rose. 



Freddie Rouillard, 
Lizzie A. Veazie, 
Lyman D. Veazie. 



Cora Rouillard, 
Annie P. Cash, 
George Rose, 
Bertie Russell, 
Irving A. Flagg. 



SCHOOLS. 



(Centre, 



sWest, 



'SOUTH, 



| Higher, 

I Primary, 

Highest, 

Intermediate. 

Primary, 

Highest, 

Intermediate. 
Primary, 



)East, 

)South-East, 

.North, 



Ventrf i Higher, 

LENTRE, | rrimary) 



TEACHERS. 



sWEST, 



'SOUTH. 



( Highest, 

] Intermediate 

( Primary, 

( Highest, 

J Intermediate 

( Primary, 



)EA8T, 

)South-East, 

\NORTH, 



/Centre, 



( Higher, 
) Primary, 

f Highest, 
'West, \ Intermediate 
[ Primary, 

f Highest, 

(Intermediate. 
Primary, 

>EA8T, 
)SOUTH-EAST, 

.North, 



)SOTJTH, 



SUM.UEU. 

Hiss Carrie E. Lawrence; 
" Ella F. Lawrence, 

" Lucy M. Emerv, 

11 Martha T. Whitcomb, 

" Sarah M. Newhall, 

" Amelia D. Oomstock, 
" Carrie M. Hapgood, 
" J. E. Schouler, 

" Emma Wetherbee, 

•' Ellen 0. Clark, 

Mrs. Angie W. Harris, 

Totals, 
. Fall. 
Miss Carrie E. Lawrence, 
" Ella F. Lawrence, 

" Lucy M. Emery, 

" Martha T. Whitcomb, 

" Sarah M. Newhall, 

" Amelia D. Comstock, 
" Carrie M. Hapgood, 
" Lottie C. Faulkner, 

" Emma "Wetherbee, 

" Ellen 0. Clark, 

" Mrs. Angie TV. Harris, 

Totals, 
Winter. 
Mr. Luther Conant, 
Miss EttaEouillard, 
" S. F. Wright, 

Miss Jennie A. Conant, 
Miss Martha F. Hazelton, 
" Emma I. Draper, 
Miss Sarah M. Newhall, 

" Amelia D. Comstock, 
" Carrie M. Hapjrood, 
{ Miss Cornelia C. Ballou, 
[ " Emma M. Buffum, 

Miss Hattie A. Bruce, 
Corrinna Shattuck, 

Mrs. Angie W. Harris, 

Total Winter Term, 
Aggregate for year, 



2 

2 

2 1-4 
2 1-4 
2 1-4 

2 1-2 

2 1-4 

2 1-4 



23 3-4 

2 1-4 
2 1-4 

2 1-2 
2 1-2 
2 1-2 

2 1-4 
2 1-4 
2 1-4 

2 1-4 

2 1-4 

2 1-4 



$27 
22 

32 
24 
20 

27 
26 
20 

26 

26 

26 






26 24 5-! 
35 30 



8276 

$27 
24 



25 1-2 8285 
2 1-2, $50 
2 1-2 22 



3 1-2 
3 
3 34 



33 14 8331 



1 32 1-2 8892 1014 894 



25 14 
26 

32 

21 34: 

26 2-3 
27 

23 2-5 

22 2-3 



14 3-o 1 



274 

24 
1-2 

20 1-2 

28 

34 

217-11 
31 

31 

23 2-5 
19 1-3 
14 3-5 



'A 



z - 
6 
4 ™< 



317 280.3 

44 36.5 
38 32 



28 1-3 
27 1-2 
34 

33 3-5 
37 1-4 

30 4-5 



3-vi 



25 1-2 
19 1-2 



340 



143 



87 



134 422 



15 



Total average percentage of attendance during the year, 88 26-100. 



REPORTS OF 



THE SELECTMEN 



— AND — 



OTHER OFFICERS 



—OF THE— 



TOWN OF ACTON, 

FROM 

FEBRUARY 26, 1869, TO FEBRUARY 26, 1870, 

INCLUDING THE 

Marriages, Births and Deaths in 1869. 

— AESO, THE— 

REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



PRINTED BY TOLMAN & WHITE, 

221 "Washington Street, Boston. 

1870. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



APPROPRIATIONS AND RECEIPTS. 



Unexpended balance of last year, 


$2,530 


63 


Borrowed of J. K. Putney, 


650 


00 


Town grant, 


5000 


00 


Town grant for schools, 


2325 


00 


Regular town grant for highwa3 7 s, 


1200 


00 


Special town grant for highways, 


300 


00 


Overlayings on taxes, 


70 


77 


Overlay ings on road taxes, 


8 


10 


State tax, 


2300 


00 


County tax, 


936 


33 


State aid to Jan. 1st, 1869, 


384 57 


Corporation tax, 


767 


29 


Military account, 


253 


80 


Militia bounty, 


738 


50 


Uniforms for Davis Guards, 


1080 


00 


Armory rent, 1868, 


150 


00 


State school fund, 


150 


92 


Dog fund, 


89 


25 


For timber, QQ feet, 


1 


98 


Graham witness fees, 


3 


50 


For use of Town Hall, 


94 


75 


From George Kendall, for expenses 


incurred 




respecting his father, 


20 


00 


From sale of Cemeteiy lots, 


8 


00 








EXPENDIT 


URES. 

SCHOOLS. 




SUPPORT OF 




Appropriation for 1869, 


$2,325 00 


State school fund, 


150 


92 

— $2,475 92 



(3) 



PAYMENTS. 



SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 



Paid Moses Taylor, for Centre School, 
Levi W. Stevens, for West 
E. F. Richardson, for South 
William B. Davis, for East 
John White, for North 
George Wilde, for Southeast 



$448 
642 
642 
254 
243 
243 



65 
53 
53 
79 
71 
71 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

Paid Moses Taylor, repairs on Centre sch. house, $6 55 
Incidentals, 

Levi W. Stevens, repairs on West " 
Incidentals, 

E. F. Richardson, repairs on South " 
Wm. B. Davis, repairs on East " 
Incidentals, 

George Wilde, repairs on Southeast " 
Incidentals, 



4 


60 


132 


24 


3 


62 


10 


45 


24 


46 


1 


52 


7 


25 


1 


05 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 



$2,475 92 



Paid Joseph Noyes, 
Daniel Fletcher, 
Samuel Hosmer, 
Ai Robbins, 
John Conant, 
G. W. Li verm ore, 
L. R. Forbush, 
Daniel Harris, 
John White, 
J. W. Loker, 
Simon Tuttle, 
George H. Harris, 
John R. Houghton, 
E. H. Cutler, 
Antoine Bulettc, 
James Tuttle, 
J. H. Conant, 
Moses Taylor, 



$191 74 



$73 25 


76 


50 


42 


55 


67 


63 


39 


50 


46 


60 


108 


15 


92 


40 


45 


81 


24 


00 


78 


40 


36 


71 


149 


90 


120 


90 


37 


70 


162 


06 


176 


41 


53 


11 


»- 


$1,431 58 



SPECIAL REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS AND SLUICES. 

Paid Benj. Hapgood, for repairing road in his 

district, 852 00 

Ai Robbins, for repairing gravel pit road, 63 10 
Nathan Brooks, for repairing road in his 

district, 17 00 

Richard Kinsley, for repairing road near 

his house, 10 00 

Daniel Tuttle, for repairing road and build- 
ing sluice near the centre of the town, 91 85 
Do., for repairing road and building sluice 

in the centre of the town, 102 97 

Moses Taj'lor, for repairing roads in his 

district, 25 00 

Thomas Kinslej*, for repairing sluice near 

the house of Samuel Chaffin, 5 00 

James Tuttle, for repairing roads in South 

district, m 600 00 

Simon Tuttle, for repairing roads in his 

district, 25 00 

E. H. Cutler, for repairing road near the 

house of William Reed, 15 00 

J. E. Billings, for repairing road near the 

house of William Wheeler, 5 40 

Thomas Kinsley, for work done on road 

near the house of Mrs. Harriet Davis, 2 50 
Simon Hapgood, for gravel and work near 

the house of William Wheeler, 5 00 

William W. Davis, for widening bridge on 

the road leading to his house, 2 50 

George Chandler, for work done on bridge 

near Robbins' saw-mill, 2 50 

$1,024 82 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS BY ORDER OF COUNTY 
COMMISSIONERS. 

Paid Francis Kinsley, balance for repairing road 

near Nagog Pond, $86 50 

Thomas Kinsley, for laying wall and build- 
ing sluice near house of S. F. Hosmer, 20 50 
Daniel Tuttle, for repairing road near East 

Cemetery, 56 00 

Do., repairing road near Robbins' saw-mill, 51 90 
Simon Tuttle, for railing the road near East 

Cemetery, 92 47 



6 



Paid Thomas Kinsley, for repairing road near 

East Cemetery, 2 50 

Simon Tuttle, balance for repairing road 

near East Cemetery, 345 00 

E. J. Robbins, for repairing road near the 

house of John White, 60 00 

Thomas More, balance repairing road 

near Concord line, 51 00 

Daniel Harris, for repairing drive-way near 

Robbins' saw-mill, and for gravel, 9 50 

J. K. Putney, for gravel for road near his 

house, 5 00 

John Grimes, balance repairing road near 

Robbins' saw-mill, 75 00 

Louis Rouillard, for building road near 

NagogPond, 66 50 

Do., for gravel for the same, 8 00 

J. E. Billings, for building sluice near Rob- 
bins' saw-mill, * 15 50 
William Reed, for putting in sluices near 

his house, 26 10 

E.J. Robbins, repairing road in his district, 13 20 



BREAKING ROADS. 

Paid John Conant, $9 00 

Daniel Harris, 9 00 

J. H. Conant, 6 20 

W. H. Reed, 4 40 

J. Noyes, 6 60 

L. R. Forbush, 6 38 

Ai Robbins, 2 60 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 

Paid Town of Ashby, on account of Lot Fitch, $85 83 
George M. Brooks, for advice, 
Town of Natick, for Mary A. Law, 
City of Boston, for Mrs. Childs, 
Express to Natick, 

Samuel Hosmer, journey to Boston respect- 
ing Mrs. Nancy Baldwin, 
For John Whitney, 
Joseph Noyes, journey to Natick, 
For assistance rendered travellers, 
Town of Westboro', for George F. Bullard, 8 75 



10 


00 


78 


25 


16 


40 




60 


3 


50 


6 


00 


3 


00 


5 


75 


:1, 8 


75 



$984 67 



$44 18 



$218 OS 



EXPENSES OF TOWN FARM. 

Paid for j-oke of oxen, $275 00 

Abel Farrar, for balance of salary for 

1868, 66 66 

Simon Tuttle, for repairs on Town Farm 

barn, 74 10 

Coffin and robe, for Titus Williams, 14 76 







INTEREST. 




Paid Augustine Conant, 


$240 00 


Frederick Rouillarcl, 


102 00 


Lydia R. Keyes, 


36 00 


Daniel Harris, 


48 32 


Joel Hanscomb, 


40 80 


James E. Billings, 


131 47 


David M. Handley, 


102 00 


Cyrus Conant, 


120 00 


John R. Whitcomb, 


60 00 


Isaac T. Flagg, 


6 00 


Luther Billings, 


12 00 


Incidental interest, 


7 68 


PRINTING. 




Paid Benjamin Tolman, for printing warrants 


, $12 50 


for report of Selectmen, 


21 00 


for report of Selectmen, School Commit- 




tee and other Town Officers, 


107 43 


for voters' lists, 


12 00 


for burial permits for Town Clerk, 


2 50 


MILITARY. 




Paid for special duty June 16th, 1869, 


$253 80 


May drill and Fall encampment, 


738 50 


Uniforms, 


1,080 00 



$430 52 



$906 27 



$155 43 



$2,072 30 



STATE AID. 

Paid Hiram W. Wetherbee, $18 00 

Alson R. Sumner, 30 00 

Hattie W. Wilder, 96 00 

Rebecca C. Wright, 48 00 

Emily C. Harding, 88 00 

Joanna Moulton, 20 00 



CEMETERY. 

Paid Martin Pike, for mowing Cemetery, $23 70 

Wm. D. Tuttle, laying out lots, 75 

Henry M. Smith, do. 1 00 

Samuel Hosmer, for furnishing posts and 

work, 2 00 



BRIDGE NEAR WETHERBEE'S MILLS. 

Paid J. E. Billings, for lumber, $243 26 

" iron, 6 64 

" nails, 5 67 

" labor, 178 43 



TOWN OFFICERS. 

Paid Dr. Cfharles Little, Supt. of Schools, $85 00 

Wm. D. Tuttle, services as Assessor, 40 00 

Phineas Wetherbee, do. 25 00 

L. R. Forbush, do. 25 00 

Wm. D. Tuttle, services as Town Clerk, ( 25 00 

John E. Cutter, collecting taxes, * 80 00 

Wm. W. Davis, services as Selectman, 36 00 

E. J. Robbins, " " 20 00 

Charles Robinson, " " 14 00 



TOWN HOUSE. 

Paid John Fletcher & Sons, for 5,835 lbs. coal, 
freight, teaming, and weighing, 

George Sawyer, 500 lbs. coal, 
" " 37 gallons oil, 

Washing floors, 

One broom, 

One box lamp wicks, 

Opening hall and committee rooms, 71 
times, 

Cleaning funnel, 

A. D. Holt, for repairs on funnel, 



$36 58 


3 


50 


17 


00 


5 


00 




50 




33 


45 


50 


2 


00 


16 


48 



$300 00 



$27 45 



$434 00 



$350 00 



$126 89 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid Jonas Blodgett, auctioneer, on roads, $6 00 

J. E. Cutter, insurance on town-bouse, 150 00 
A. R. Sumner, for painting monument 

and monument fence, 9 00 
Richard Kinsley, building road near Cbarles 

Twitchell's bouse, 68 00 

Cjtus Fletcber, for work in armory, 225 51 
Wm. D. Tuttle, viewing roads, by request 

of Selectmen, 4 25 

Do., writing lease of arnKny, 1 00 
Do., grading road near Charles Twitchell's 

house, 5 00 
Express paid on reports and public docu- 
ments, 2 80 
Samuel Hosmer, for examining and reporting 

on school-houses, 3 00 

Francis D wight, for do., 2 00 

L. R. Forbush, for express, 87 
George F. Wetherell, for grave-stone for 

Ezekiel Davis, 30 00 

James Tuttle, for rent of school-room, 50 00 

Cutler Brothers, for do., 50 00 
T. F. Lawrence, filling hole where hay 

scales stood, in West Acton, 6 00 
J. E. Cutter, summoning 20 persons to take 

oath of office, 2 50 

Stamp on note, 35 

Francis Dwight, superintending burials, 45 00 

Do., making return of 17 deaths, 1 70 
Wm. D. Tuttle, journey to Sudbury, to make 

out election returns, 2 50 

Do., postage on returns, - 30 

Do., paid express on Assessors' book, 30 
Do., making copy of town tax-book for 1869, 

for State Department, 7 00 

Do., express on law book, 30 

Do., collecting and recording 28 births, 8 40 

Do., recording 27 deaths, 4 70 

Do., " 17 marriages, 2 55 

Do., putting in sluice near his house, 5 00 

Do., Collector's book, 1 12 

George Sawyer, care of town clock, 10 00 

Do., tolling bell 22 times for deaths, 4 40 

Do., cleaning town clock, 1 50 

J. E. Cutter, abatement of taxes', 47 89 

Do., discount on taxes, 612 00 



$1,370 94 



10 



Receipts and Expenditures from Feb. 26, 1869, to Feb. 26, 1870. 

Unexpended balance as per report of Feb. 26, 1869, $2,530 63 
Appropriations, 8,825 00 

Other receipts, 7,707 76 







$19,063 39 


EXPENDITURES; 




Support of schools, 




$2,475 92 


Repairs of school-houses, 




191 74 


Repairs of highways, 




1,431 58 


Special repairs of highways,* 




1,024 82 


Repairs of highways by order of 


County 




Commissioners, 




984 67 


Breaking roads, 




44 18 


Support of poor, 




218 08 


Expenses of Town Farm, 




430 52 


Interest, 




906 27 


Printing, 




155 43 


Military, 




2,072 30 


State aid, 




300 00 


Cemetery, 




27 45 


Bridge near Wetherbee's Mills, 




434 00 


Town officers, 




350 00 


Town House, 




126 89 


Miscellaneous, 




1,370 94 


State tax, 




2,300 00 


County tax, 




936 33 

$15 781 1° 






Balance in the Treasury Feb. 26, 


1870, 


$3,282 27 


TOWN DEBT. 




Ebenezer Con ant, 




$2,067 6G 


Augustine Conant, 




4,135 33 


Daniel Harris, 




840 80 


Frederick Rouillard, 




1,778 10 


Joel Hanscom, 




700 40 


James E. Billings, 




2,237 57 


David M. llandley, 




1,715 90 


Isaac T. Flagg, 




105 90 


L} T dia It. Keyes, 




027 60 


Calvin Harris, 




214 00 


Luther Billings, 




202 &U 


John R. AVhitcomlN 




506 50 


Jonas K. Putney, 




687 37 

$15,849 99 



11 



Amount due from State aid, 
Rent of armory, 
Treasurer, 



$300 00 

200 00 

3,282 27 



$3,782 27 
$12,067 72 



WM. W. DAVIS, ) Selectmen 
E. J. ROBBINS, } of 
C.ROBINSON, ) Acton. 



Acton, Feb. 26, 1870. 



REPORT OF THE 
RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



AT THE 



ALMSHOUSE IN ACTON 

For the Year Ending April 1st, 1870. 



ARTICLES ON HAND APRIL 1st, 1870. 

12 cows, $840,00 ; horse, 250,00 ; 2 shotes, 40,00, $1,130 00 

2k tons hay, 65,00 ; straw, 6,40 ; 9 bush, wheat, 15,75, 87 15 

21 fowls, 15,75; 18 bush, ashes, 4,50; 114J lbs. 
bacon, 26,00, 

250bbls. pork, 50,00; 140 do. beef, 16,80; 54 do. 
candles, 10,80, 

50 bbls. lard, 11,50; 33 do. butter, 13,20; 1 bbl. 
apples, 4,00, 

1-2 bbl. soap, 2,50; pickles, 1,00; 50 bush, pota- 
toes, 27,50, 

5 M skewers, 3,00 ; 1 1-2 bush, meal, 1,65 ; beans, 1,00, 

dried apple, .60 ; coffee, .50 ; tea, .65, 



46 


25 


77 


60 


28 


70 


31 
1 


00 
65 
75 


$1,408 


10 



RECEIPTS. 

For milk, $1,281,00 ; carryingmilk, 84,00 ; calves, 32,20,81,397 20 

hop-poles, 73,12 ; eggs, 10,51 ; old iron, 2,00, 85 63 

beef, 43,40; hides, 16,08 ; pork, 4,77, 64 25 

soap-grease, 6,31 ; potatoes, 94,05; straw, 10,42, 110 78 

oxen, 255,00 ; berries, 32,83 ; grapes, 1,50, 289 33 

oats, 14,40 ; skewers, 23,48 ; lard, 9,80, 47 68 

apples, 242,60; onions; 1,48, 244 08 

From Lucy A. Brown's estate, 52 98 

$2,291 93 
Recieved of treasury for oxen, $275 00 

$2,566 93 
(12) 



823 46 


23 


80 


263 


00 


7 


40 


105 


88 


69 


52 


11 


99 


125 


46 



13 



EXPENDITURES. . 

For grinding, 87,97 ; straw, .52 ; potatoes, 14,97, 
paper, .05 ; butchering, 4,50 ; rice meal, 19,25, 
cows, 214,50 ; pasturing, 42,00 ; driving, 6,50, 
soap, .12 ; mending shoes and harness, 1,65 ; 

wheat, 5,63, 
shotes, 27,00 ; labor, 78,78 ; whip, .10, 
whitewashing, 1,75 ; hay, 59,90 ; fish, 7,87, 
barrels, 10,54; axle-bed, 1,00; bug poison, .45, 
meal, 121,96 ; Mr. Jackson, 1,50 ; Titus, 2,00, 
expenses to Boston, 6,33 ; weighing, .93 ; butter, 

75,98, 83 94 

beef, 39,74 ; castings, 1,53 ; basket, .45 ; turnips, 

15.10, 
repairing clock and pump, .84 ; stove, 5,00, 
blacksmith's bill, 25,06 ; brush, .45, 
newspaper, 1,73 ; tin ware, .75 ; Dr. Cowdry's bill, 

30,00, 
sleigh bells, 1,25 ; soap, 3,67 ; cheese, 16,78 ; 
smoking hams, .80 ; oil meal, 192,23 ; shorts, 76,04, 
plaster, 4,05 ; flour, 51,42 ; card, .50 ; beans, 3,37, 
salt, 8,27; rice, 1,01 ; tea, 18,40; molasses, 26,67 
saleratus, .78 ; kerosene, 2,43 ; hoes, 1,20 ; snath, 92, 
pork, 17,03 ; tobacco, 4,32 ; sugar, 25,35, 
matches, 2,20 ; ropes, 1,25 ; crackers, 5,38, 
nails, 4,58 ; medicine, 2,96 ; soap, 1,96 ; chalk, .04, 
vinegar, .50 ; glass, .55 ; raisins, 2,82 ; thread, .07, 
saltpetre, .13 ; sage, .30 ; hops, .33 ; neats oil, 1,05, 
pails, .70 ; sulphur, .10 ; shirting, 1,62 ; spice, 3,57, 
mustard, .90 ; starch, .08 ; wicks, .43 ; broom, 1,00, 
washing-machine, 12,50; yeast, .12; lantern, 1,10, 
bags, .30 ; coffee, 2,40 ; peas, .99 ; phosphate, 7,98, 
crockery, 1,14 ; turnip seed, .70 ; blacking, .08, 
oyster shells, .10 ; clothes and cloth, 24,18, 
scythes, 2,62 ; sponge, .10 ; grass seed, 7,37, 
starch, .28 ; mop handle, 12 ; blueing, .06, 
veal, 2,84 ; cream tartar, .75, 
ox work, 4,00 ; use of bull, 4,50 ; cider, .90, 
Mr. and Mrs. Abel Farrar, for their services, one 

year, 375 00 

Samuel Hosmer, for making report to Board of 

State Charities, and report to, the town, 5 00 

Do., for services as overseer of the poor, 8 00 

Joseph Noyes, services as overseer, 8 00 

Simon Tuttle, " " 8 00 

81,802 34 



56 


82 


5 


84 


25 


51 


32 


48 


21 


70 


69 


07 


59 


34 


54 


35 


5 


13 


46 


70 


8 83 


9 


54 


3 


94 


1 


81 


5 


99 


2 


41 


13 


72 


11 


67 


1 


92 


24 


28 


10 


09 




46 


3 


59 


9 


40 



14 



Amount of inventory, April 1st, 1869, 1,486 65 

Interest on farm, 239 40 



$3,528 39 
Total amount of receipts, $2,566 93 

Amount of inventory, April 1st, 1870, 1,408 10 



$3,975 03 
$446 64 



Victualling travellers, $29 00 



Cash on hand, April 1st, 1870, $446 64 

Cash from treasury, for oxen, 275 00 



Income above expenses, $171 64 

Loss of a cow, $75,00. 

Whole number of persons (exclusive of travellers) supported in 
the almshouse, 5 ; average number, 3 4-5 ; present number, 3. 



Samuel Hosmek, ) Overseers 
Joseph No yes, > of 
Simon Tuttle, ) Poor, 



Acton, April 1, 1870. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



BIRTHS REGISTERED IN ACTON IN 18C9. 

No. Date of Birth. Name of Child and Parents' Names. 

1. Jan. 30, Walter Clifton Gardner, son of George and Violette 

F. Gardner. 

2. Feb. 22, Ora Josephine Cobleigh, daughter of Ephraim and 

Harriet E. Cobleigh. 

3. Feb. 25, Jennie Robbi'ns, daughter of Levi H. and Mary C. 

Robbins. 

4. Feb. 27, Abby Pitman Colman, daughter of George W. and 

Louise M. Colman. 

5. March 2, Susie Mary Davis, daughter of Alvin A. and Mary 

T. Davis. 

6. March 27, George Cresswell Warren, son of George H. and 

. Rebecca N. Warren. 

7. April 14, Emily Bertha Hosmer, daughter of Horace R. and 

Carrie H. Hosmer. 

8. May 17, Robert Gardner Reed, son of Isaac G. and Jane 

Maria Reed. 

9. May 25, Hattie May Robbins, daughter of Simon and Nancy 

D. Robbins. 

10. May 26, Mary Ella King, daughter of Francis and Mary King. 

11. June 5, Evelyn Stanwood Fletcher, daughter of Edwin and 

Susan Fletcher. 

12. June 22, Otis Moody Cutler, son of Nathaniel E. and Sarah 

A. Cutler. 

13. Aug. 4, Bessie Florence Winckle}^, daughter of John S. and 

Rose Winckley. 

14. Aug. 21, Charles A. Fletcher, son of Aaron S. and Sarah T. 

Fletcher. 

15. Aug. 24, Annie W. Brackett, daughter of William H. and 

Ellen L. Brackett. 
1G. Aug. 30, Mattie F. Randolph, daughter of E. L. F. and Hattie 
A. Randolph. 

17. Sept. 4, Lilla May Teel, daughter of William II. and Mary 

E. Teel. 

18. Sept. 20, Ernest Elwood Wetherboo, son of D. James and 

Augusta A. Wetherboe. 
(15) 



16 



19. Oct. 2, Mary Florence Fletcher, daughter of Aaron J. and 

Mary E. Fletcher. 

20. Oct. 30, Lilla Alice Thompson, daughter of Albert S. and 

Martha A. Thompson. 

21. Oct. 31, Frank Ellis. Fiske, son of James W. and Maria Fiske. 

22. Oct. 31, Hannah Hayes, daughter of Michael and Mary Hayes. 

23. Nov. 11, Emma Estelle Knowlton, daughter of George W. 

and Angie PI. Knowlton. 

24. Dec. 17, Lizzie Hannon, daughter of Michael and Mary A. 

Hannon. 

25. Dec. 22, Mary Augusta Davis, daughter of William B. and S. 

Maria Davis. 

26. Dec. 23, Emma Augusta Hartwell, daughter of Henry and 

Augusta H. Hartwell. 

27. Dec. 27, Henry Bertram Going, son of Myron F. and Maria 

W. Going. 

28. Dec. 30, Susie Lillian Kallock, daughter of Isaac M. and Sa- 

lome C. Kallock. 
Males, 8 ; females, 20 ; total, 28. 

Nov. 21, 1868, Nina Eloise Taylor, daughter of Thomas and 
Martha A. Taylor. 



MARRIAGES RECORDED IN ACTON IN 1869. 

No. Date of Marriage. Names of Parties. 

1. Jan. 1, Mr. Frederick C. Nash, of Columbia Falls, Me., and 

Miss Clara H. Hapgood, of Acton. 

2. Jan. 21, Mr. Luther Conant and Miss S. Augusta Davis, both 

of Acton. 

3. Jan. 24, Mr. Oliver C. Wyman, of Acton, and Mrs. Hannah 

Frost, of Lowell. 

4. March 4, Mr. Zenas Folger, of Waltham, and Miss Ora A. 

Hosmer, of Acton. 

5. April 4, Mr. Oscar E. Preston and Miss Mary Sophia Fuller, 

both of Acton. 

6. April 8, Mr. Augustine Hosmer and Miss Susie H. Richard- 

son, both of Acton. 

7. April 29, Mr. Varnum Tuttle, of Acton, and Mrs. Mary M. 

Jordan, of AVorcester. 

8. May 16, Mr. George McWhirter and Miss Maria G. Holmes, 

both of Concord. 

9. Sept. 2, Mr. Addison B. Wheeler, of Acton, and Mrs. Berin- 

tha W. Sawyer, of Westford. 
10. Sept. 9, Mr. Sylvanus R. Hunt and Miss Marion M. Sears, 
both of Acton. 



17 



11. Sept. 20, Mr. Henry S. Hapgood, of Acton, and Hattie M. 

Webster, of Marlborough. 

12. Nov. 11, Mr. Henry Brooks and Mrs.. Julia A. Munroe, both 

of Acton. 

13. Nov. 17, Mr. John W. Kittredge, of South Groton, and Miss 

Ellen Franklin Taft, of Acton. 

14. Nov. 18, Mr. Alfred A. Whitcomb, of Boxborough, and Miss 

Seraphina Moore, of Stow. 

15. Nov. 21, Mr. Lowell A. Jones and Miss Sarah A. Parmenter, 

both of Acton. 

16. Nov. 25, Mr. Julian Tuttle and Miss Hannah E. Livermore, 

both of Acton. 

17. Nov. 25, Mr. Henry T. Billings, of Worcester, and Miss Emma 

F. Flagg, of Acton. 



DEATHS IN ACTON IN 1869. 

No. Date of Death. Names and Age. 

1. Jan. 12, John W. Haggerty, son of William and Catherine 

Haggerty, aged 1 yr. 6 mos. 

2. Jan. 29, Mr. Nathaniel S. Adams, aged 56 yrs. 9 mos. 

3. Jan. 30, George Adams, son of Nathaniel S. and Louisa W. 

Adams, aged 17 yrs. 11 mos. 

4. March 4, Susan Fiske, daughter of Robert and Susan Fiske, 

aged 5 yrs. 5 mos. 

5. March 7, Emma E. Fiske, daughter of Robert and Susan Fiske, 

aged 9 mos. 12 days. 

6. March 7, Herbert C. Fiske, son of Robert and Susan Fiske, 

aged 2 yrs. 8 mos. 

7. March 10, Mrs. Sophia H. Taylor, wife of Mr. Silas Taylor, 

aged 77 yrs. 

8. March 12, Jennie Robbins, daughter of Levi H. and Mary C. 

Robbins, aged 15 days. 

9. March 15, Miss Hattie S. Decoster, aged 21 yrs. 9 mos. 27 days. 

10. March 16, Mr. Ebenezer W. Hayward, aged 56 yrs. 6 mos. 

11. March 16, Mr.. Albert Adams, son of Nathaniel S. and Louisa 

W. Adams, aged 24 yrs. 

12. March 20, Irving A. Flags, son of Isaac T. and E. Maria 

' o So ' 

Flagg, aged 13 yrs. 3 days. 

13. July 9, Mr. Moses Treadwell, aged 60 yrs. 3 mos. 

14. July 17, Mrs. Mary E. Conant, wife of Mr. John Conant, aged 

46 yrs. 6 mos. 9 days. 

15. Aug. 6, Mrs. Nancy Estabrook, wife of Mr. Joseph Estabrook, 

aged 44 yrs. 2 mos. 6 days. 

16. Aug. 16, Mrs. Damaris llandley, aged 63 yrs. 2 mos. 



18 

17. Aug. 16, Titus Williams, aged 63 yrs. 

18. Aug. 22, Miss Ella E. Whitcomb, daughter of Joel II. and 

Eliza J. Whitcomb, aged 18 yrs. 6 mos. 6 da3's, 

19. Sept. 3, Miss Rhoda S. Walker, aged 20 yrs. 8 mos. 9 days. 

20. Sept. 22, Mrs. Mary T. Davis, wife of Mr. Alvin A. Davis, 

aged 32 yrs. 6 mos. 9 days. 

21. Oct. 18, Delmar G. Barker, son of Henry and Louisa M. Bar- 

ker, aged 4 yrs. 

22. Nov. 16, Dr. Charles Little, aged 32 yrs. 9 mos. 

23. Nov. 17, Mrs. Mary Ann Wood, wife of William F. Wood, 

aged 41 yrs. 6 mos. 19 days. 

24. Dec. 7, Miss Abbie Holclen, aged 41 yrs. 

25. Dec. 11, Alice G. Gardner, daughter of George and Violette 

F. Gardner, aged 5 yrs. 9 mps. 11 days. 

26. Dec. 17, Mr. William M. Gilmore, aged 59 yrs. 

27. Dec. 22, Mrs. Lovisa Randall, aged 85 yrs. 3 mos. 

WILLIAM D. TUTTLE, Town Clerk. 
Acton, March 18, 1870, 



REPORT OF CEMETERY COMMITTEE. 



WEST CEMETERY. 
, Dr. 

To cash on hand, February, 1869, 
" 7 lots sold, 
" grass, 
" 10 loads loam, 

Cr. 

By cash paid Ira Stockwell, labor, 
" " for teaming, 
" on hand, February, 1870, 



$10 96 
7 00 
1 00 
1 25 


$15 00 
3 45 
1 76 



$20 21 



$20 21 



Charles Hastings, 

For the Committee. 



EAST CEMETERY, 
Dr. 

To cash received for 6 lots sold, $6 00 

" " from town of Acton, 20 70 



$26 70 



Cr. 
By cash paid Martin Pike, mowing brush in 

Cemetery, $23 70 

do. Samuel Hosmer, for work in Cemetery, 2 00 
do. H. M. Smith, numbering^ lots, 1 00 



$26 70 



H. M. Smith, V Q 

Samuel Hosmer, \ CommUte i 
Charles Hastings, ' 



SGS, J 

(19) 



THE 



ANNUAL REPORT 



— OF THE — 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



— OF THE- 



TOWN OF ACTON, 



— FOR THE — 



SCHOOL- YEAR 1869-70. 



PRINTED BY TOLMAN & WHITE, 

221 Washington Street, Boston. 

1870. 



REPORT 



Citizens of Actox :• 

Owing to failing health, Dr. Little resigned his position 
of local committee for the Centre District, and chairman of 
the Board, at the close of the Spring term of the schools. 
At a meeting of the Selectmen and School Committee, 
during vacation, Mr. Moses Taylor was chosen to serve out 
the unexpired term of Dr. Little, as local committee ; and 
we as chairman of the Board. We assumed the duties of 
the office with extreme reluctance; — indeed, would hardly 
have accepted at all, had we not cherished the hope that Dr. 
Little, after a rest, would so far recover his usual health as 
to assume the chairmanship again during the Winter. This 
hope, however, proved delusive; for, ere that time arrived, 
we sadly joined in the requiem over his mortal remains, 
and saw them carried to their final resting place. In the 
death of Dr. Little, the town lost an honored and respected 
citizen, and the cause of education a devoted friend. 

We claim your indulgence while we present a few 
thoughts, which, we trust, will prove beneficial to our 
schools. 

School-Houses. — We heartily commend the action the 
town took, at its March meeting, to immediately commence 
the erection of one or more convenient buildings for the use 
of schools. The action was not taken a moment too soon, 
we can, from personal knowledge, most positively assert. 
We repeat what we have said before on this point, that we 
can never cultivate proper feelings of respect for property, 



either public or private, in the minds of our children, by 
constantly sending them to school in rooms that present 
such an inconsistent, dilapidated aspect, as to render the 
temptation irresistible to hit the hanging ceiling a poke, or 
try their knives and pencils here and there, on the walls and 
benches, all the while reasoning to themselves, — and not 
far from the truth, — " can't make them look much worse." 
We hope the town will take the same action each succeed- 
ing year, until we have school-houses in every part of it 
that we shall not feel ashamed of ; — fo,r what tends more 
directly to degrade a town, and lower it in public estimation, 
than a set of ' ' old tumble down school-houses " that will 
not compare with the average of stables ? We know the 
expense will be considerable, but we know, too, that we 
cannot put our money where it will yield a more sure or 
greater interest than in investing it in what will promote a 
right and judicious education of our children. If there is 
any class of, men who hang like a dead weight upon 
progress, and the true moral and intellectual elevation of the 
masses, it is those who shrug up their shoulders and groan to 
think they cannot invest quite so much in government 
bonds and bank stock, because they must pay a tax towards 
promoting a truly worthy object. They are constantly 
harping that scholars * ' would tear new school-houses to 
pieces in a little while, so they would look as bad as the old 
ones." Such men would set their sons to mowing grass 
with a stub-scythe, for fear they would injure a better one, 
or let their daughters get down on their hands to wash floors 
to save the expense of a mop-handle. What, we ask, ought 
to give us more pleasure, when age has crept upon us, and 
our heads are whitened for the grave, than to think we 
contributed cheerfully towards those means of education and 
improvement that directly tended to place our sons and 
daughters in positions of honor and trust ? And will not 
these same sons and daughters, when far away they hear 
some one speak in terms of praise of their native town, and 



her educational facilities, proudly say : that is my town — 
there I was educated ? 

Discipline. — That there has been an evident lack of ef- 
ficient discipline in some of our schools the past year, we 
will not deny ; neither do we admit that the teachers hare 
been wholly to blame. We know that, in some instances, 
parents have hurled their anathemas at teachers, and said 
they ought not to be retained in charge a single day, and 
blamed the Committee because they were. We would like 
to ask such, if they ever consider all the bearings of the 
case, as the Committee has to. That there is usually a cor- 
responding laxity of parental discipline at home; that a 
first-class experienced teacher cannot always be obtained, 
and the Committee must take a novice in the art, and help 
them through as best they can. There are some who clamor 
loudly for order just so long as the rules are applied to 
somebody's children but their own ; but when their child- 
ren are made to " toe the mark," the teacher is all wrong, 
and no business to make such rules and regulations, and 
inflict punishment in this manner or that. Ah ! parents, do 
you ever stop to think, when using such language before 
your children, that they may sometime be placed in cir- 
cumstances where they will have the very life crushed out of 
them by just such opposition? When, with proper en- 
couragement, they might have become eminently successful. 
To those who wish for better teachers, and a more efficient 
discipline, as far as teachers are concerned, we would say : 
we must raise the standard of wages, and attract them to us, 
rather than repel by their meagerness. And yet, the rate 
of wages is not the whole reason why many teachers will 
not enter some of our schools. They well know there are 
some scholars who do not intend to come under the dis- 
cipline of any teacher, or any one, perhaps we might say. 
Now we have got to depend mainly upon female teachers, 
and cannot expect, in a majority of instances, to obtain 
those who are physically competent to cope with vicious 



6 

scholars, — nor should we expect it. An excellent teacher 
remarked to us, at the close of her Winter term, " I shall 
not, for any consideration, enter into an engagement to teach 
this school again ; for, besides hearing in a thorough manner, 
some twenty recitations a day, they expect me to 'thrash' 
some of the largest boys into obedience, which I consider 
neither right nor proper to expect of any female." What 
shall be done? Shall we continually submit to have our 
schools broken up and become a by-word and reproach, 
because some scholars will neither avail themselves of the 
advantages afforded, nor let others ? Is it right or just to 
let honest, industrious scholars be cheated out of their time 
and money in this manner, as many are? The answer 
is plain, the law must be enforced. Not that we would have 
wrong, by any means, done to any scholar, but rather, that 
justice be visited upon the few who are guilty, and not 
injustice upon the many who are innocent. 

Reading. — Good reading is to be. regarded as the most 
important branch of education. It is, indeed, a great ac- 
complishment ; and the common school is the place for 
acquiring it. The teacher should not only understand the 
pauses and pronunciation, but he should understand the 
elocutionary department, so that he can read.a passage, and 
give the various modulations of voice, as a perfect example 
for his scholars to imitate. One paragraph, or one verse, 
taken up at each lesson, and so thoroughly studied that each 
member of a class can read it correctly, is better than pages 
read over in the hasty careless manner that is practiced in 
some schools. Good reading, like good music, thrills with 
its magic power, and awakens an answering chord in every 
breast. 

Writing. — That this branch of education is altogether too 
much neglected, those who examine the writing-books in 
most of our schools will testify. What Henry Ward Beecher 
says of dress will apply to writing. He says that "dress 
does not make a man, but when a man is made he looks bet- 



ter dressed up." So writing does not make ideas, but if a 
person has ideas worth committing to paper, they certainly 
ought to he written in a neat, legible manner. A few days 
ago we received a communication from a publishing house 
in Boston, with the agent's name signed in such a scrawling 
manner that had we not seen it in print we must forever 
have remained in ignorance as to what it was. Such writing 
is a nuisance and imposition to the person who must try and 
decipher it. Teachers should take more pains to thoroughly 
qualify themselves to give instruction in this branch. They 
should be able to illustrate to their scholars how the pen 
should be held, and how the letters are formed. And when 
the writing-hour comes, insist that every scholar gives his 
undivided attention to it, and conforms to the explanations 
and copy given them as models, else there will be but little 
improvement. 

Grammar. — This is usually considered by scholars a dull, 
dry study, and teachers should understand and appreciate its 
importance, so as to be wide awake in devising interesting 
methods of teaching it. We would like to see Aids to Eng- 
lish Composition introduced into all the higher departments 
of school, to be taught in connection with grammar. In the 
only school where it was introduced the past year, the teacher 
assured us that the class, consisting of some twenty-five 
members, were much interested, and certainly the results 
were highly satisfactory. We have not a very high opinion 
of those who think more of dead and foreign languages than 
they do of our own. When we meet with such, we are 
reminded of a young man who engaged to teach school in 
the same town where we were once teaching. He was 
brought before the chairman of the committee (with whom we 
boarded) for examination, and, among other questions, was 
asked, "What connects North and South America ?" 
Scratching his head and looking quite perplexed, he finally 
said, "he had not paid much attention to the common 
branches ; he had been studying the higher, preparing to en- 



8 

ter college ; really, he had forgotten whether it was land or 
water." 

Arithmetic. — Of this branch we cannot say but what 
there is time jsnough spent in studying it. Most children 
commence it at the age of six or seven, and continue to drone 
over it as long as they attend school, if to the age of twenty- 
one. In one school we found Eobinson's Higher and Prac- 
tical ; Greenleaf 's Higher, besides some four classes in alge- 
bra. We thought this "too much of a good thing," and 
requested that the algebra classes be combined into two, at 
least, and that Greenleaf 's Arithmetic be excluded from the 
list of studies. In another school we found the same written 
arithmetics, algebra, and several classes in Eobinson's Men- 
tal and Primary. We requested Greenleaf s to be excluded 
from this school. Now, with the numberless classes or 
divisions that a teacher must make — especially in a mixed 
school — in arithmetic, it takes nearly one-half of each school- 
day to hear these recitations ; much more, we think — and 
we would not undervalue it — than its importance demands. 
We believe one text-book on written and one on mental 
arithmetic, is sufficient for our common schools. These, 
with a teacher competent to teach them in a thorough, prac- 
tical manner, will furnish a scholar with all the knowledge 
he need have of this branch, to enter any of our higher 
institutions of learning in half the time spent upon the 
study now. 

We now pass to a brief view of the schools and teachers, 
for the last year, which, with the knowledge we have of 
them, we will endeavor to give in an impartial manner. 

West Primary School.— This school, throughout the 
year, was under the instruction of Miss Sara M. Newhall. 
Miss Newhall is an excellent teacher, and performed a work 
in this school that will long be remembered by both pupils 
and parents. Her examinations called forth much and well- 
deserved praise for herself and scholars. 



9 

West Intermediate School. — This is a difficult school 
to keep in working order, and needs a teacher of much firm- 
ness and decision. Such an one was found in Miss E. I. 
Draper, who had charge throughout the year. It gave us 
much pleasure, at the examinations, to highly commend this 
teacher for the labor she had performed, and many of the 
scholars for the advancement they had made. 

West Grammar School. This school was taught by 
Miss Jennie A. Conant during the Spring and Fall terms, 
who fully sustained her well-established reputation as a 
teacher. The examination was well attended, and gave good 
satisfaction. Miss Lizzie M. Burr taught during the Winter 
term. Miss Burr is a good teacher, and had not a few 
scholars so far demeaned themselves as to injure the govern- 
ment, the school would have been a highly successful one. 
This school contains some of the most advanced scholars of 
any in town. 

East School. — Miss A. J. Whittredge was placed in 
charge during the Spring and Fall terms, and Mr. W. L. 
Hurd during the Winter term. Both were inexperienced 
teachers, and did not succeed so well as we could wish. 
We think, however, it might have been otherwise, had the 
teachers met with proper encouragement. Mr. Hurd came 
well recommended, and is a young man of good abilities. 

Xorth School. — This is a quiet and orderly school, where 
the scholars appreciate the advantages afforded and try to 
make the most of them. Miss Lottie A. Dutton was placed 
in charge during the Spring term, and commenced the Fall, 
but left, when part through, for reasons that hardly met our 
approval. Mrs. Angie Harris finished the term with her 
usual success. The Winter term was under the care of Miss 
Sarah W. Loker. Miss Loker is a thorough scholar herself, 
and an excellent teacher. Suffice it to say, that her instruc- 
tion, and the advancement of the school, met our warm 
approval. 



10 

South Primary School. — Miss Martha A. "Whitney was 
placed in charge during the Spring term, and considering the 
size of the school (part of the Intermediate were placed in 
this school for this term), and that it was her first effort, did 
very well. Miss Hattie E. Handley, also a "beginner," had 
charge during the Fall term. The examination was very 
pleasant indeed and showed that her labors had been a 
decided success. Miss Whitney again had charge during 
the Winter term, and governed and instructed the school 
much to our satisfaction. 

South Intermediate School. — The scholars belonging 
to this school were divided, and part sent to the Grammar, 
and part to the Primary, for the Spring term. The Fall 
term was taught by Miss Whitney with fair success. The 
Winter term was commenced by Miss Nellie M. Bradley. 
Some of the scholars behaved so badly that she became dis- 
couraged, and left the third day. Miss Handley succeeded 
her, and did the best she could to restore order, but did not 
succeed quite so well as we could have wished. There are 
some rogues in this school -who need severe discipline. 

South Grammar School. — This school had the advantage 
of the same excellent teacher for another year. Miss Corn- 
stock has labored here with such untiring industry that her 
school, in many respects, has become a model one. The 
examinations were of that high order that need no praise 
from us. We will 'only speak of the large class in Aids to 
English Composition ; every member answered promptly, 
and not a question was missed. 

South-East School. — This school was unfortunate 
enough to have four teachers during the year. Miss Cor- 
rinna Shattuck taught during the Spring term, how well, 
we cannot say, as our predecessor left us no minutes. Miss 
Lizzie S. Piper taught during the Fall term with excellent 
success, considering it was her first effort at school teaching. 
Her examination showed that the scholars had made good 



11 

improvement. Miss Piper has two good traits for a teacher : 
energy and decision. The Winter term was commenced by 
Miss Anna Randall, who, from lack of energy to either 
govern or instruct, soon left. Miss Maria P. Hastings was 
then engaged to finish the term. Miss Hastings passed one 
of the best examinations of any teacher that ever came before 
us, and we heartily wish her success in her first effort. And 
had she maintained good order it would have been all we 
desired. The examination was better than we expected ; 
indeed, quite good. • 

Centre Primary School. — This school had three different 
teachers during the year. Miss Carrie M. Hapgood in the 
Spring ; Miss Junia S. Bartlett in the Fall ; and Miss 
Lizzie M. Priest in the Winter. We have no record of 
Miss Hapgood's success. Both the other teachers won for 
themselves much credit, for their good order and thorough 
instruction. At the examinations, we were pleased to give 
the scholars much praise for the prompt and correct manner 
in which they recited. 

Centre Grammar School. — Miss Piiest had charge of 
this school during the Spring and Fall terms. Under her 
instruction the scholars made good progress, and were 
commended at the examination. The Winter term was 
commenced by Rev. Mr. Jackson. Mr. Jackson had borne 
the reputation of being an excellent teacher, and, we doubt 
not, would have carried the school to a^succesful close had 
his health proved equal to the task imposed upon it. That 
failing, he relinquished his charge at the end of the fifth 
week. E. F. Richardson was engaged to teach the remain- 
der of the term. As to his success, we leave other and less 
partial judges, to record. 

Changes in Text-Books. — Town's series of readers, 
which had been in our schools for a long time, were ex- 
changed for Hillard's ; — a change which was much needed, 
and, Ave believe, is giving universal satisfaction. At the 
commencement of the year, the P. D. and S. system of pen- 



12 

manship was exchanged for the Spencerian. This, however, 
after a fair trial, not proving what was desired, a subsequent 
change was made for the Potter and Hammond series, 
which, we think, in some respects, is superior to any we 
have examined. We would advise a change in our mental 
arithmetics as soon as possible. Eobinson's, which are now 
in use, are altogether too difficult for ordinary intellects, 
— they discourage to begin with. The fact is, most of the 
problems require a good knowledge of written arithmetic 
to solve them with any degree of facili%. This is not as it 
should be, and we hope soon to see ' a more simple and 
gradual book introduced. 

E. F. RICHARDSON, 

Chairman. 



FINANCIAL. 



SO 

Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 


UTH 

and fii 


SCHOOLS. 

-es, 
E. F. Rich, 


$642 53 
9 46 


Amount paid teachers, 
Paid for fuel, 
Furniture, care of rooms 
Balance to new account, 


$575 
47 
11 
17 


25 

41 
67 




LRDSON 


€ 



151 99 



$651 99 



CENTRE SCHOOLS. 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 

Amount paid teachers, 

Paid for fuel, 

Care of rooms and fires, 



$448 65 
31 68 


$449 96 

26 37 

4 00 



$480 33 



$480 33 
Moses Taylor, Committee. 



SOUTH-EAST SCHOOL. 

Appropriation, $243 71 

Balance from last year, 22 05 



Amount paid teachers, 


$192 90 


Paid for fuel, 


20 00 


Care of rooms and fires, 


5 00 


Balance to new account, 


47 86 



$265 76 



$265 76 
George Wilde, Committee. 
(13) 



14 



NORTH SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, $243 71 

Balance from last year, 2 $9 



Amount paid teachers, 
Paid for fuel, 
Care of rooms and fires, 
Balance to new account, 


Jom 


$221 35 

16 00 

5 36 

3 89 




i White, C 


I 

Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 


:ast SCHOOL- 




$254 79 
2 29 


Amount paid teachers, 
Paid for fuel, 
Care of rooms and fires, 
Balance to new account, 


$227 00 

19 00 

2 75 

8 33 



$246 60 



$246 60 



$257 08 



$257 08 
William B. Davis, Committee. 



WEST SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last year* 

Amount paid teachers, 
Paid for fuel 
Care of rooms and fires, 
Balance to* new account, 



$642 53 
4 00 


$594 00 
39 25 

6 00 

7 28 



$646 53 



$646 53 
Levi Stephens, Committee. 



Number of children reported by Assessors^ between the ages of 
five and fifteen, 306. 

Amount of money raised by town, $2,325 00 

Income from State school fund, 150 92 

-* 

Total for schools, $2,475 92 

Sum appropriated by town for each scholar reported 

by Assessors, $7 60 



15 



TABLE 









3 


t 


3 


> 

< 


p 


o 


o 








cn? 


OP? 


o_ 




= 


o 


a 




SCHOOLS. 


TEACHERS. 


^5" 

o o 

s *** 
5 g, 


09 

•a 

a 


o 


1 

> 

3" 


2 
en 
<< 


< 
<t> 

$ 


o 

1 








' 1 


| ? S 




3 


i 


O 











s* 


o 


1 
P 


z 

p 


2, 

SB 

a 


00 

o 






Spring. 












Centre 


( Grammar, 
| Primary, 


Miss Lizzie Iff. Priest, 


2 1-4 S27 28 241-4 




1 


6 


" Carrie M. Hapgood, 


2 1-4 24 33 29 1-3 






4 




| Grammar, 


" Jennie A. Conant, 


21-4 33 25 23 




7 




West 


I Intermediate^ 


" E. J. Draper, 


2 1-4 26 27 24 






10 




( Primary, 


11 Sarah M. Newhall, 


21-4 22 31 301-4 






11 


South 


( Grammar, 
\ Primary, 


" Amelia D. Comstock, 


2 1-2 32 39 32 1-2 




10 


4 


" Martha G. Whitney, 


21-2 1 26 45 40 


1 




3 


East, 




" A. J. Whittredge, 


21-4 26 30 23 1-3 


1 


2 


1 


South-East, 


" Corrinna Shattuck, 


21-4 26 25 23 2-3 


1 


1 


1 


North, 




" Lottie A. Dutton, 

Totals, 


21-4 26 17l 14 1-2 


1 


_2 


6 




23 


268 


300 


264 5-6 


4 


23 


46 






Fall. 
















Centre 


( Grammar, 
( Primary, 


Miss Lizzie M. Priest, 


21-4 


27 


33 27 34 




4 


8 


" Junia S. Bartlett, 


2 1-4 


24 37 29 2-3 






4 




( Grammar, 


" Jennie A. Conant, 


21-2 33 29 251-2 




6 


3 


"West 


< Intermediate, 


" E. J. Draper, 

" Sarah 31. Newhall, 


2 1-2 26 30 24 






3 




( Primary. 


2 1-2 24 35 32 14 


1 




7 




( Grammar, 


" Amelia D. Comstock, 


2 1-4 1 32 40 32 




14 


7 


South 


I Intermediate, 


" Martha G. Whitney, 


21-4 22 26 231-4 






5 




( Primary, 


" Hattie E. Handley", 


21-4 20 21 18 1-2 






2 


East, 




" A. J. Whittredge, 


2 1-4 


26 30 25 1-4 


1 


1 





South-East, 


" Lizzie S. Piper, 


21-4 


26 29 25 1-3 


2 


3 


1 


North, 




f Miss L. A. Dutton, 
I Mrs. Angie Harris, 

Totals, 














21-4 26; 17 151-3 


1 
5 


2 
30 


5 




25 1-2 , 286 


327 


278 5-6 


~45 






Winter. 
















\ Grammar, 


( Rev. Mr. Jackson, 
1 Mr. E. F. Richardson, 


11-4 1 40 












Centre 


13-4! 50! 45 36 3-4 




25 


4 




( Primary, 


Miss Lizzie M. Priest, 


2 3-4 27 41 34 34 






8 




I Grammar, 


" S. Lizzie Burr, 


2 14 33 34 31 




13 


1 


West 


< Intermediate, 


" E. J. Draper, 


2 1-2 28 31 29 14 






1 




( Primary, 


" Sarah M. Newhall, 


2 1-2 | 24 33 30 1-2 






10 




( Grammar, 


" Amelia D. Comstock, 


314 


&5 38 331-4 




22 


8 


South 


] Intermediate, 


" Hattie E. Handley, 


3 


26 26 23 1-2 




1 


2 




( Primary, 


11 Martha G. Whitney, 


3 


24 26 211-2 








East, 


:r„«* 


Mr. W. L. Hurd, 
| Miss Anna Randall, 
| " Maria P. Hastings, 


2 34 
1-2 


40| 33 27 

28 




7 




South-Laoi, 


2 


30 i 29 25 




4 


1 


North, 




Miss Sarah W. Loker, 

Aggregate for the year. 


31-2 30 23 19 


_ 


8 

80 

~133 


2 




31 370 359 3111-2 


~37 










791-2 


924 


986 


855 1-6 


~128 



REPORTS OF 



The Selectmen and other Officers 



TOWN OF ACTON, 



FROM 



FEBRUARY 26, 1870, TO FEBRUARY 27, 1371, 



INCLUDING THE 



Marriages, Births and Deaths in 1870. 



ALSO, 



THE REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 



TOLMAN & WHITE, PRINTERS, 221 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON. 

1871. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



APPROPRIATIONS AND 


RECEIPTS. 


Unexpended Balance of last year, 


$3282 27 


Borrowed of Wrn. Wheeler, 


500 


00 


Regular Town Grant, 


4500 


00 


Town Grant to build School Houses, 


3000 


00 


Town Grant for Schools, 


2325 


00 


Town Grant for Highways, 


1200 


00 


State Tax, 


2300 


00 


County Tax, 


933 


36 


Military Account, 


807 


00 


State Aid, to January 1st, 1870, 


282 


00 


Corporation Tax, 


768 


14 


Uniforms for Company E, 


80 


00 


Armory rent, 1869, 


150 


00 


School Fund, 


185 


54 


From sale of old School House, East District, 105 


00 


East School House stove, 


4 


00 


Surplus from Town Farm, last year, 


477 


07 


Use of Town Hall, 


131 


25 


Use of cellar, 


10 


48 


Dog Fund, 


77 


11 

$21 1 1£ 99 









EXPENDITURES. 



SUFPORT OF SCHOOLS. 

Paid John E. Cutter, for Centre School, 
L. W. Stevens, West 
Wm. W. Worster, South 
Wm. B. Davis, East 
John White, North 



Geo. Wilde, South East 



(3) 



$513 


94 


669 


62 


669 


62 


258 


36 


244 


12 


244 


12 



$2,599 78 



SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS, 

Paid L. W. Stevens, West District, 
Wm. B. Davis, East " 

John White, North " 

J. E. Cutter, South East " 
" Centre " 

Win. W. Worster, " 



AND INCIDENTALS. 



$26 


79 


9 


30 


7 


00 


16 


00 


13 


38 


7 


38 



$79 85 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 



Paid Daniel Fletcher, for 1869, 
A. H. Jones, 
Samuel Chaffin, 
Jon. A. Piper, 
J. E. Billings, 
John Grimes, 
Henry Haynes, 
James Tuttle, 
Jas. C. Wheeler, 
John Harris, 
Luther Conant, 
Francis Pratt, 
I. T. Flagg, 
Addison B. Wheeler, 
Adelbert Mead, 
J. E. Cutter, 
C. A. Crampton, 



$5 80 



Paid George W. Liver more, 

Luke Hapgood, gravel,- 

John Grimes, building bridge near the 
house of Alonzo Tuttle, 

William D. Tuttle, surveying road in 
West Acton, 

D. Harris, repairing bridges and roads, 

James E. Billings, repairing and railing- 
roads, near Wetherbee's Mills, 

James Tuttle, putting in sluice near 
Tarbell's store, 

Wm. W. Davis, repairing road in the 
centre of the town, 

John Conant, widening and railing the 
bridge near his house, and repairing 
two other bridges, 



57 


30 


85 


00 


54 


30 


89 


85 


41 


60 


32 


54 


124 


94 


26 


50 


36 


71 


64 


00 


75 


00 


37 


96 


26 


40 


145 


03 


79 


35 


39 


00 




&1 0-21 28 




VJ-)«-JL aO 


ND 


BRIDGES. 


$10 55 


2 


50 


6^ 


00 


6 


00 


18 


62 



13 40 



26 50 



222 22 



132 84 



Paid Luther Conant, relaying bridge, and re- 
pairing road, near the house of L. R. 
Forbush, 85 00 

L. W. Piper, for straightening road near 

his house, 55 14 

Land for same, 20 00 

Francis Pratt, repairing bridge near pow- 
der mills, 4 
A. G. Fay, for ditto, 10 
A. B. Wheeler, building sluice, 12 
A. L. Tuttle, work on gravel pit road, 24 
Estate of Joel Hanscom, for work done 
on road near the house of Luther Pi- 
per, 13 00 
Joel Hanscom, for land, 11 00 
J. E. Cutter, repairing bridge, 15 00 
A. H. Jones, for relaying sluice near 

Dwight's Mill, 54 25 - 

Hemy Haynes, 9 96 

A. Mead, repairing sluices, 10 00 



00 
15 
20 
14 



BREAKING ROADS IX 



Paid George W. Livermore, 
Antoine Bulette, 
Addison B. Wheeler, 
Daniel Fletcher, 
James Tuttle, 
E. H. Cutler, 
J. B. Houghton, 
Samuel Hosmer, 
John Grimes, 
George Harris, 
Henry Haynes, 
I A. Mead, 
Simon Tuttle, 



-70. 




$10 40 


37 


40 


8 


50 


17 


40 


17 


40 


14 


60 


16 


00 


2 


40 


5 


80 


3 


00 


5 


30 


8 


75 


9 


15 



8821 4: 



$156 10 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 

Paid board for Mrs. Jonas Ilandley, 818 00 
J. Billings, for Lot Fitch, 1868, 2 50 
Samuel Hosmer, expenses to Natick, re- 
specting Mrs. Luke Law, 60 
Support of Julia A. Haynes, 10 25 
Sarah Childs, 22 75 
" James O. Fitch, 54 63 
" Betsey J. Fitch, 10 00 



Paid for funeral expenses of James 0. Fitch, 31 00 
Joseph Noyes, journey to Boston respect- 
ing James O. Fitch, and settling ac- 
count, 4 00 
Simon Tuttle, rent of house for Mrs. 

Sarah White, 10 00 

Simon Tuttle, journey to Boston, respect- 
ing N. P. Haynes, 3 00 
Do., journey to Bolton, 1 50 
Luther Conant, support of Mrs. Sarah 

White in Worcester, 27 50 



EXPENSES OF TOWN FARM. 

Paid J. W. Livermore, for hay, $50 00 

J. E. Billings, pauper register, 1868, 3 50 

Samuel Hosmer, work, 4 00 

Benj. F. Merriam, stone, 25 00 

Simon Tuttle, material for Town Farm 

House, 65 60 

Do., work done on Town Farm buildings, 182 87 
Do., labor and material, 277 42 

Cyrus Fletcher, work, 30 02 

Coffin and robe for C}tus Handley, 15 60 

Jos. Noyes, assistance rendered travellers, 6 00 
Simon Tuttle, for paint, 

" 32 rolls of paper, 

" fixing for door, 

u moving building, 

u services as building committee, 

John Grimes, labor, 
Dr. Cowdrey, timber, 
Francis Conant, labor and lime, 
James Billings, 225 feet clapboards, 
A. H. Hodgman, for work, 
Cash paid, 

For stove and funnel, 
Cash for pump, 
For lead pipe, 
For lodging travellers, 
Frank Robbins, sawing, 



3 


00 


5 


40 


1 


50 


1 


10 


je, 6 00 


18 


00 


2 


92 


30 


62 


9 


00 


7 


00 




75 


3 


50 


10 


00 


1 


25 




50 


43 


93 



$195 



$804 48 



INTEREST. 




Paid Augustine Conant, 


$292 00 


Calvin Harris, 


24 00 


Jonas K. Putney, 


39 00 


Lydia R. Keyes, 


36 00 


Frederick Rouillard, 


102 00 


James E. Billings, 


131 47 


Daniel Harris, 


48 32 


D. M. Handley, 


102 00 


Joel Hanscom, 


40 80 


J. R. Whitcomb, 


30 00 


Luther Billings, 


12 00 


Cyrus Conant, 


140 00 


PRINTING. 




Paid Tolman & White, for warrants, &c., 


20 00 


Selectmen's reports, 


16 70 


Town Officers' reports, 


93 35 


Notices of cattle disease, 


2 50 


MILITARY. 




Paid for uniforms for Co. E, 


$80 00 


May drill and Fall encampment, 


807 00 


STATE AID. 




Paid Hiram W. Wetherbee, 


$18 00 


Hattie N. Wilder, 


96 00 


Rebecca C. Wright, 


48 00 


Joanna Moulton, 


48 00 


Emily C. Harding, 


8 00 


Nancy B. Richards, 


57 33 


Minnie A. Munroe, 


62 53 







$997 59 



$132 55 



$887 00 



$337 86 



CEMETERY. 

Paid Martin Pike, for work in East Cemetery, besides 

$5.50 worth of hay sold, $24 42 



, 



TOWN TOMB. 



Paid William Reed, labor, 


$69 60 


S. L. Dutton, sharpening tools, 


3 99 


E. J. Robbins, for cash paid, 


2 00 


John White, granite, 


10 00 


Charles Wheeler, teaming, 


66 00 


A. Davis, sharpening tools, 


4 20 


John Harris, labor, 


45 60 


Daniel Harris, " 


37 50 


Luke Smith, 


148 00 


" " for cash paid, 


15 62 


Luke Tuttle, teaming, 


14 00 


Daniel Wetherbee, door, 


30 66 


Ai Robbins, labor, 


45 00 


William Reed, for granite, 


60 00 


William W. Davis, for cash paid, 


4 00 


" " " journey to Westford, 


2 50 


TOWN OFFICERS. 




Paid E. F. Richardson, Superintendent of 




Schools, 


$70 00 


Estate of Charles Little, 


20 00 


William D. Tuttle, services as Town Clerk 




for the year ending March 6, 1871, 


25 00 


J. E. Cutter, collecting taxes, 


80 00 


Daniel Wetherbee, services as Assessor, 


18 00 


A. C. Handlev, " " 


21 00 


C. A. Harrington, " " " 


18 00 


William W. Davis, services as Selectman 


, 36 00 


E. J. Robbins, " " " 


20 00 


C. Robinson, " " " 


14 00 



TOWN HOUSE. 

Paid John E. Cutter, for lead and oil, 
" " " " teaming, 

Francis Jones, painting, 

Cyrus Fletcher, 

J. Fletcher & Sons, 3,660 lbs. coal, 
" " " freight, 

" " " teaming, 

" " " weighing, 

Charles Robinson, 42J gals, kerosene, 

for kerosene barrel, 



$131 


28 


3 


15 


230 


80 


8 


49 


14 


64 


3 


20 


2 


00 




24 


13 


37 


1 


50 



$558 67 



$322 00 



Paid Geo. Sawyer, opening town-hall 76 times, 
7^ gallons oil at .50, 
coal hod, 
6 lamp chimneys, 
1 broom, 
setting glass, 
washing floors, 
care of clock, 



52 


05 


3 


75 


1 


05 




80 




50 




50 


6 


00 


10 


00 



$483 32 



EAST SCHOOL HOUSE. 



Paid James E. Billings, 
For lead and oil, 



$3,000 00 
18 22 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid H. S. Hapgood, tolling bell for 5 deaths, $1 00 

Levi W. Stevens, for examining school 
houses in 18G9, 

Lj^dia R. Keyes, on account of note, 

Peter Tenney, for horse shed, 

Francis Dwight, repairing hearse, 

John Fletcher, Jr., for rent of Armory, 

William D. Tuttle, for stationery, 

Express on School Reports, 

Running line on Town Common, 

Meeting County Commissioners at West 
Acton, 

Express on Laws and Resolves, 

Cash and express for Law Book, 

For express, 

John Fletcher, Jr., for reception of Mas- 
sachusetts military, 

Removing Tablets and painting Mon- 
ument fence, 

D. H. Hall, tolling bell for 7 deaths, 

Cyrus Fletcher, for attending 13 funerals, 
from Jan. 1, 1869, to April 1, 1869, 

Making returns of 13 deaths, 

Selectmen perambulating Sudbury line 
and moving town bounds, 

Perambulating Boxboro' line, 
Carlisle " 
Littleton " 

Expenses incurred in running Stow line 

and establishing bounds, 47 17 

2 



2 


00 


100 


00 


10 


00 


28 


00 


150 


00 


1 


50 




30 


2 


50 


1 


50 




35 




40 




30 


287 34 


9 


37 


1 


75 


32 


50 


1 


30 


3 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 



;,018 22 



10 



Paid J. E. Cutter, insurance on East School 

house for five years, 61 50 
Cyrus Hale, for express, 1 55 
William W. Davis, postage and stationery, 1 00 
W. D. Tuttle, express on Public Documents, 35 
Do., journey to Sudbury to make out elec- 
tion returns, 2 50 
Do., postage on election returns, 50 
Do., collecting and recording 24 births, 7 20 
Do., recording 18 marriages, 2 70 
Do., recording 18 deaths, 3 60 
Do., express on law book, 30 
Do., stationery and postage, 50 
Francis Dwight, superintending 17 fune- 
rals, 51 00 
Expense on hearse, 2 00 
" " sleigh hearse, 4 00 
Making returns of 21 deaths, 2 10 
J. E. Cutter, notifying persons to take 

oath of office, 3 00 

Stamp for William Wheeler's note, 25 

D. Wetherbee, collector's book, 1 50 
" " express, 25 
Cutler Brothers, rent of School-room, 50 00 
James Tuttle, « u " 50 00 
James Blodgett, selling old School-house 

in East District, 5 00 

Geo. Sawj T er, tolling bell for 9 deaths, 1 80 

Geo. Ropes, plan for West School-house, 50 00 

Levi Dow, highway damages, 10 40 

E. Bobbins, use of tomb 20 years, 20 00 



$1,018 28 



RECEIPTS FROM FEB. 26, 1870, TO FEB. 27, 1871. 

Unexpended balance as per Report of Feb. 26, 1870, $3,282 27 
Appropriations, 11,025 00 

Other Receipts, 6,810 95 

$21,118 22 



EXPENDITURES. 

Support of Schools, $2,599 78 

Repairs of School-houses and Incidentals, 79 85 

Regular highway work, 1,021 28 

Special repairs of highways and bridges, 821 47 

Breaking roads, 156 10 



11 



Support of poor, 




195 73 


Expenses of Town Farm, 




804 48 


Interest, 




997 59 


Printing, 




132 55 


Military, 




887 00 


State aid, 




337 80 


Cemetery, 




24 42 


Town Tomb, 




558 67 


Town Officers, 




322 00 


Town-house, 




483 32 


East School-house- 




3,018 22 


Miscellaneous, 




1,018 28 


State Tax, 




2,300 00 


County Tax, 




933 36 




February 


^Ifi fi01 Ofi 






Balance in the Treasury 


27, 1871, $4,426 26 


TOWN 


DEBT. 




Ebenezer Conant, 




$2,067 QQ 


Augustine Conant, 




4,135 33 


Daniel Harris, 




840 86 


Frederick Rouillard, 




1,778 10 


Joel Hanscom, 




700 40 


James E. Billings, 




2,237 57 


David M. Handley, 




1,745 90 


Isaac T. Flagg, 




111 50 


Lydia R. Keyes, 




527 60 


Calvin Harris, 




202 60 


Luther Billings, 




202 60 


John R. Whitcomb, 




506 50 


Jonas K. Putney, 




687 37 


William Wheeler, 




523 00 


Owe for East School-house, about, 


> 


100 00 


« " grave-stones for Mrs. Brown and 




Titus Williams, 


50 00 






«1fi /Mfi oo 






Amount due from State Aid, 




$337 86 


" " Treasurer, 




4,426 26 

$4 761 1° 






Balance against the Town, $11,652 87 




WM. W. 


DAVIS, 1 Selectmen 




E. J. ROBBINS, of 




C. ROBINSON, ) Acton. 



Acton, February 27, 1871. 



REPORT OF THE 
RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



AT THE 



ALMSHOUSE IN ACTON, 

For the Year Ending April 1st, 1871. 



ARTICLES ON HAND APRIL 1st, 1871. 

12 cows, $672.00 ; horse, 250.00 ; shotes, 13.00, 

6 tons of ha}', 162.00; 5 bushels ashes, 1.25; 2 tur- 
keys, 5.00, 

250 lbs. pork, 40.00 ; 60 lbs. lard, 10.80 ; 40 lbs. can- 
dles, 6.00, 

26 fowls, 19.50 ; 140 lbs. bacon, 23.33, 

3 bbls. apples, 6.00 ; 10 bush, potatoes, 5.00 ; f bbl. 
soap, 3.00, 

i bbl. flour, 4.75. 



$935 00 


168 25 


56 
42 


80 
83 


14 
4 


00 
75 



$1,221 63 



RECEIPTS. 



For milk, $992.32 ; teaming milk, 84.00 ; calves, 48.77, $1,125 09 

Hoop-poles, 35.01 ; eggs, 9.21 ; chickens, 8.75, 

slabs, 7.71, 60 68 

Lard, 6.50 ; potatoes, 33.00 ; berries, 20.00 ; grapes, 

2.60, G2 10 

Apples, 145 ; tomatoes, 1.00 ; cabbages, .50 ; skew- 
ers, 2.10, 148 60 

Oxen, 205.00 ; work of oxen, 6.30 ; teaming, 1.50, 212 80 

$1,609 27 

Received of treasury to pay for hay, 50 00 



$1,659 27 
(12) 



13 



EXPENDITURES. 

For beans, $2.59 ; medicine, 4.10 ; mending boots, .67, $7 36 
Repairing wagon, 5.75 ; bug poison, .75 ; whet- 
stones, .37, 6 87 
Raisins, 1.06 ; haying-tools, 8.02 ; card, .25, 9 33 
Barrels, 13.55 ; oxen, 225.00 ; carving-knife, 1.00, 239 55 
Pails, 1.50 ; making cider, 1.97 ; lantern, 1.25, 4 72 
Butchering, 2.00 ; repairing pump, 3.00 ; pigs, 8.00, 13 00 
Account books, .70 ; filing saw, 1.13 ; wrench, 1.25, 3 08 
Whiffle-tree, .37 ; curtains, .42 ; pasturing cows, 38.50, 39 29 
Cutting hoop-poles, 12.80 ; tin ware, 1.25 14 05 
Weighing hay, 1.50 ; repairing harness, 2.25, 3 75 
Smoking bacon, .70 ; hooping bbl. .40 ; wood-box, .25, 1 35 
Blacksmith's bill 35.26 ; 1 pair reins, 2.75, 38 01 
Nails, .83 ; brooms, 1.08 ; slippers, .75 ; kettle, .85, 3 51 
Axe-helve, .30 ; grass-seed, 4.53 ; potatoes, 9.75, 14 58 
Rope, .40 ; castings, 1.75 ; garden seeds, .42 ; hoe, .75, 3 32 
Stove polish, .10 ; tomato plants, 1.05 ; hops, .20, 1 35 
Handles, .64 ; spider, .50 ; basket, .92, 2 06 
Paint, .57 ; varnish, 1.75 ; oil-cloth, 2.64, 4 96 
Toweling, .90 ; clothing, 12.75 ; vinegar, .69, 14 34 
Yeast, .10 ; crackers, .80 ; rice, .66 ; onions, 1.05, 2 61 
Rosin, .18 ; can, .37 ; saltpetre, .18 ; squash, .44, 117 
Axe, 1.25 ; use of bull, 3.00 ; oil, 4.36, 8 61 
Labor, 142.09 ; nutmegs, .35 ; cloves, .13 ; matches, 

1.85, 144 42 
Cassia, .96 ; sugar, 26.41 ; tea, 19.05 ; starch, .14, 46 56 
Pepper, .46 ; mustard, .47 ; cream tartar, 1.15 ; gin- 
ger, .46, 2 54 
Saleratus, .96 ; molasses, 16.84 ; cheese, 14.47, 32 27 
Soap, 6.97 ; salt, 6.35 ; fish, 10.99 ; butter, 53.72, 78 03 
Meat, 95.13 ; tobacco, 12.61 ; flour, 65.72, 173 46 
Plaster, 4.40 ; corn, 6.85 ; rye, 1.86 ; oats, 10.94, 24 05 
Corn-meal, 172.00 ; oil-meal, 154.46 ; shorts, 91.66, 418 12 
Hay, 115.68 ; hen feed, 3.97 ; grinding, .48, 120 13 
Teaming, 2.00 ; Dr. Cowdrey's bill, 16.00, 18 00 
Services of John Blood and wife, 285 00 
Luther Conant, making Report to Board of State 

Charities, and Report to the Town, 6 00 

Luther Conant, for services as Overseer of the Poor, 8 00 

Joseph Noyes, " " " " " " " 8 00 

Simon Tuttle, " « " " " " " 10 00 



$1,811 45 
Total amount of Receipts, 1,659 27 



14 



Drawn from Treasury, to balance account, $152 18 

Received from Treasury to pay for hay, 50 00 



Income less than Expenditures, $202 18 

One hundred and six lodgers, also breakfast and sup- 
per for each, $53,00. 

Interest on the farm, 239 40 

Expenditures in excess of* Receipts, 202 18 



$441 58 



Cr. By seventy-eight dinners furnished carpenters and 

masons, 29 25 



Cost of supporting the Poor, $412 33 

Whole number of persons (exclusive of travellers) supported in 
the almshouse, six ; average number, four and one-half ; present 
number, four. 

Luther Conant, \ Overseers 
Joseph Noyes, > of 
Simon Tuttle, ) Poor. 
Acton, April 1, 1871. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 



BIRTHS IN ACTON IN 1870. 

No. Date of Birth. Name of Child and Parents' Names. 

1. Jan. 3, Fred W. Billings, son of James E. and Tamson 

Billings. 

2. Feb. 28, Elwyn Wheeler Harris, son of George H. and Angie 

Harris. 

3. March 12, Morris Andrew Lane, son of Morris and Mary E. 

Lane. 

4. March 19, Bertha Elizabeth Edmonds, daughter of Albert T. 

and Maria M. Edmonds. 

5. April 1, John Calnann, son of Daniel and Ellen Calnann. 

6. April 12, Patrick Edward Trainer, son of Hugh and Hannah 

Trainer. 

7. April 29, Edith Sophia Dunn, daughter of Waldo G. and 

Fannie M. Dunn. 

8. May 2, Samuel James Staple, son of William H. and Jane 

Staple. 

9. May 17, Hattie Louise Tuttle, daughter of Alonzo L. and 

Ellen O. Tuttle. 

10. May 18, Velma Augusta Hosmer, daughter of Augustine and 

Susie H. Hosmer. 

11. May 21, Horace Mann Counter, son of John and Elizabeth J. 

Counter. 

12. May 25, Ida Marion Littlefield, daughter of Hanson and 

Florence M. Littlefield. 

13. June 29th, Alfred Dumont Holt, son of Abner D. and Abbie 

J. Holt. 

14. Jury 3, Lizzie Mannion, daughter of John and Julia Mannion. 

15. July 4, Hobert Emery Mead, son of Oliver W. and Lucy M. 

Mead. 

16. July 23, Joel Foster Ha}^ward, son of Joel F. and Sarah E. 

Hayward. 

17. July 26, Charles Franklin Randall, son of Freeman L. and 

Amelia A. Randall. 

18. Aug. 14, Lucius Everett Hosmer, son of Lucius S. and Ella 

F. Hosmer. 

19. Aug. 29, Frank Lester Wyman, son of Charles and Lucia M. 

Wyman. 

(15) 



1(3 



20. Sept. 4, Allie May Preston, daughter of Oscar E. and Mary 

E. Preston. 

21. Sept. 24, Susan Edwards Conant, daughter of Luther and S. 

Augusta Conant. 

22. Oct. 1, Michael James Sheny, son of John and Bridget 

Sherry. 

23. Nov. 12, Lillian Francis Richardson, daughter of Edward F. 

and Harriet F. Richardson. 

24. Nov. 26, Edwin Mason Parker, son of Edwin C. and Hannah 

H. Parker. 

25. Dec. 25, Maria Marion Walker, daughter of John A. and 

Betsey M. Walker. 
2G. Dec. 27, Hattie Elvira Cobleigh, daughter of Ephraim and 
Harriet E. Cobleigh 
Males, 15 ; females, 11 ; total, 26. 



MARRIAGES RECORDED IN ACTON IN 1870. 

No. Date of Marriage. Names of the Parties. 

1. Jan. 5, Mr. Lucius S. Hosmer and Miss Ella F. Tuttle, both 

of Acton. 

2. Jan. 13, Mr. Charles H. Staples, of Stowe, and Miss Isabella 

C. Leland, of Acton. 

3. March 17, Mr. John Conant, of Acton, and Mrs. Anna Eliza- 

beth Foster, of Barre. 

4. April 20, Mr. Isaac W. Flagg, of Boston, and Miss Emma 

Wctherbee, of Acton. 

5. April 24, Mr. Elwyn H. Whitcomb, of Boxborough, and Miss 

Mary F. Houghton, of Acton. 
G. April 28, Mr, Augustus Bunce, of Westford, and Miss Emily 
W. Loker, of Acton. 

7. May 11, Mr. William H. Wood, and Miss Hattie Tuttle, both 

of Acton. 

8. May 14, Mr. Hiram Dolby, of Lowell, and Miss Abbie A. 

Gates, of Acton. 

9. June 5, Mr. James D. Coburn, and Miss Marietta M. Graham, 

both of Acton. 

10. June 27, Mr. John P. Rouillard, of Cambridge, and Miss 

Margaret Wa} r ne, of Acton. 

11. July 17, Mr. Samuel A. Guilford and Miss Ellen M. Keyes, 

both of Acton. 

12. Aug. 25, Mr. Alvin A. Davis and Miss Susan M. Smith, 

both of Acton. 

13. Oct. 13, Mr. William H. Norton, of Cambridge, N. Y., and 

and Maiy F. Dix, of Boston. 



17 



14. Nov. 6, Mr. William S. Handley and Miss. S. Lizzie Rich- 

ardson. 

15. Nov. 16, Mr. Albert B. Brown and Miss Mary L. Stevens, 

both of Acton. 

16. Nov. 19, Mr. Neil Curry and Miss Mary Elizabeth Wheeler, 

both of Acton. 

17. Dec. 20, Mr. George W. Crampton and Miss Estella M. 

Wright, both of Acton. 

18. Dec. 25, Mr. David C. Cutler and Miss Estella A. Mead, both 

of Acton. 



DEATHS REGISTERED IN ACTON IN 1870. 

Jo. Date of Death. Name of Deceased. 

1. Feb. 16, Mrs. Eliza Conant, wife of Mr. Silas Conant, aged 

65 yrs. 8 mos. 5 days. 

2. Feb. 28, Mr. Cyrus Putnam, aged 72 yrs. 10 mos. 24 days. 

3. March 5, Mr. Amos Handley, aged 70 years. 

4. March 15, Mrs. Salome C. Kalloch, aged 25 yrs. 

5. April 21, James Dooley, aged 1 yr. 5 mos., son of* Richard and 

Joanna Dooley. 

6. April 28, Mr. Ira Stockwell, aged 64 yrs. 10 mos. 

7. May 24, Mrs. Hattie A. Randolph, aged 28 yrs. 7 mos. 

8. June 10, at Port Deposit, Md., Charles A. Fletcher, son of 

Aaron S. and Mary T. Fletcher, aged 9 mos. 20 
days. 

9. July 7, Eddie A. Sawyer, son of Henry L. and Lucy A. Saw- 

yer, aged 2 mos. 1 day. 
.0. July 28, Mrs. Eunice Maria Flagg, wife of Mr. Isaac T. 

Flagg, aged 53 years. 
.1. July 28, Mr. Isaac Bullard, aged 79 jts. 
.2. July 29, Clara L. Bruce, daughter of Jeptha C. and Annie E. 

Bruce, aged 1 3a*. 6 mos. 
.3. Aug. 27, Miss Mary E. Page, aged 28 yrs. 6 mos. 
.4. Sept. 3, Mrs. Orie L. Hanscom, wife of Mr. Henry Hanscom, 

aged 22 yrs. 6 mos. 
.5. Sept. 18, Mr. Winthrop F. Conant, aged 55 yrs. 3 mos. 

16. Sept. 30, Lucius Hapgood, son of Andrew and Eliza Hap- 

good, aged 19 yrs. 7 mos. 26 days. 

17. Oct. 30, Mr. Cyrus Handley, aged 61 yrs. 

18. Dec. 2, Mr. Joel Hanscom, aged 68 yrs. 8 mos. 23 days. 

WILLIAM D. TUTTLE, Town Clerk. 
Acton, March 26, 1871. 



THE ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON, 



FOR THE 



SCHOOL-YEAR 1870-71, 



TOLMAN & WHITE, PRINTERS, 221 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 

1871. 



REPORT. 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

Your Committee are happy in being able to report the 
condition of the schools as prosperous and healthy, and 
generally successful. There have been no cases of open 
rebellion during the past year, and yet some things have 
happened which we wish could have been different. We 
have endeavored to secure the best teachers possible, under 
the circumstances, but still we do not claim perfection in 
this respect. Good teachers are becoming more scarce every 
year, and it becomes evident to every thinking mind that 
we must pay higher prices than we have hitherto done, or be 
satisfied with second-rate teachers. The latter we are not 
disposed to do, for however low the wages paid, we find 
occasion to employ the same strong language of criticism in 
the one case as the other. Now one of two things, we as a 
town must do, raise more money for schools, or have shorter 
schools, which in our opinion are already far too short. 
There are many circumstances which serve to affect our 
schools favorably, or otherwise, which are not thought to be 
very important in the minds of the community at large. 
The qualities of a teacher are too frequently discussed in the 
presence of the children, and an opinion given (thought- 
lessly no doubt), which results unfavorably for the best 
interests of the school. What we want to impress upon the 
minds of the parents, is the importance of often visiting the 
school, enquire after the welfare of the children, and how 
they succeed at school, and not take " they say," or " I was 



told," for what is done in the school-room. Did they do 
this, I think they would sec what a hard task some teachers 
have, and feel the need of lending them their aid, by giving 
them a cheering word, and encourage them to go forward in 
the high and noble work of teaching the young and tender 
minds how to discharge the gaeat duties and responsibilities 
which await them. Also, counsel their children, and if need 
be, command them to love and respect their teachers, and 
conform to all the rules and requirements of the school. 
Better suffer stmie things that you think are not quite right, 
until they can be remedied, than to join with the multitude 
to do evil, and condemn the teacher without an investigation. 
We may succeed in obtaining the best of teachers, but unless 
they have the sympathy of the parents, and their support, 
the school will be next to a failure ; while on the contrary, a 
second-rate teacher, aided by the parents and friends of the 
school, may succeed admirably. Another reason why much 
of the value of our schools is lost to the children, is the fact 
that absences are so frequent. A little mist, or siioav, or the 
good condition of the meadow for skating, an errand to be 
done, or a little job of work, or a visit to be made, are all- 
important reasons in the minds of some of the parents for 
the children to stay away from school, and thereby an untold 
amount of injury be done, not only to the children who 
stay away, but to the whole school. 

Oh, parents, see to it that blame and guilt are not found 
in the skirts of your garments, and that half educated men 
and women do not grow up in our midst, notwithstanding all 
the privileges that they enjoy, and all the money and expense 
the town is put to, to furnish them for us. Your Committee 
wish that the people of the town could be made to feel the 
importance which this subject demands, and let nothing less 
than sickness keep their children away from the school-room, 
and our word for it, our schools would feel the effects of 
such a course, and result in a far greater amount of good to 
the children, to ourselves, and the world at large. 



School-Houses. — As this subject is now being agitated 
by the town, perhaps nothing need be said by us, and yet 
perhaps you will bear a word or two from us. You are all 
aware that the town has built one new house, in the East 
District, a nice and commodious one, which like a city on a 
hill, or a lighthouse to a harbor, sheds its benign and blessed 
influences all around, preparing us to shun the rocks and 
quick-sands of ignorance and degradation, and fill well the 
sphere alloted us in the great drama of life. There are 
other houses which demand that something should immedi- 
ately be done ; but in the eagerness of some of our friends, 
we fear that we may overleap the bounds of propriety in 
the minds of others, and the result be, that our houses will 
remain about where they now are. 

Your Committee, in view of the condition of the town, 
would recommend a moderate appropaiation to repair and 
beautify, and make attractive, our present school structures, 
rather than throw them all aside and build new altogether, 
believing that that course will well subserve the cause of 
education in our town for at least a few years. But what- 
ever may be done, we hope will be done with a union of 
purpose, and a desire to promote the best interests of the 
cause so near our hearts, believing that the investment is not 
lost, but will repay as large a per cent, as any other we 
could make. 

Text-Books. — There has been no change recommended 
during the year for two or three reasons. Within two or 
three years there have been many quite extensive changes, 
and although all may not think them the best that could be 
made, yet for our part we think them very good, with one 
exception, and that is Robinson's Mental Arithmetic ; it is 
too difficult for the place it occupies, and we would advise 
a change at the earliest practical moment, and one more 
gradual, introduced . 



6 

Discipline. — This is a difficult part of our common 
schools to control, and do justice to all parties and keep 
clear of all snags, and is becoming more so every year. 
Especially so when we consider the fact that Solomon, the 
wisest of men, is considered an old fool in respect to the use 
of the rod upon the children. Corporal punishment is be- 
coming more unpopular eveiy day. We would not advise 
the indiscriminate use of the rod, or punish for every little 
frivolous thing ; neither would we abandon, wholly, the use 
of it in our schools ; for there are, no doubt, cases where 
the use of the rod would do an untold amount of good, and 
bring the refractory scholar to terms better than to expel 
him, and thus deprive him of the benefits resulting from a 
good school, which he so much needs. I have a case or two 
in my mind now, of this kind, in our schools, the past 
winter. 

We now pass to take a hasty glance of the schools and 
the teachers of the past year. 

West Primary. — This school was taught by Miss Anna 
E. Hall, during the spring and fall terms, who fully sustained 
her reputation of previous years. She was interested in her 
scholars and her scholars in her. She labored hard, and 
accomplished a good work, as the closing examination proved. 
We were particularly interested in the map drawing of these 
young scholars, on slips of paper, which were passed at the 
examination, and think they did themselves and teacher much 
credit by so doing, and We wish it was more generally prac- 
ticed in our schools. The scholars showed their appreciation 
of her efforts to instruct, by a well selected present at the 
close. The winter term was taught by Miss S. Jennie 
Wheeler, of not much experience, yet she seemed to feel at 
home in the school-room, and won for herself and scholars 
much commendation and praise, and not undeserved, as the 
frequent visits and closing examination evidenced. She, 
also, received a present from the scholars, as a token of their 
esteem and affection. 



West Intermediate. — The spring term was taught by 
Miss E. P. Draper. She was a teacher of much firmness 
and decision, and governed and instructed much to our satis- 
faction. For the fall term, the school was divided between 
the Primary and Grammar schools. The winter term was 
taught by Miss Carrie L. \Yhitcomb, who came well recom- 
mended, and labored well and hard, and nothing appeared to 
be wrong, yet the closing examination did not quite meet our 
expectations. There was a lack of energy and promptness 
which we were unable to account for. 

\Vest Grammar. — The spring term was taught by Miss 
Edna M. Lowe, whose promptness of >manner instilled the 
same into the scholars. The school appeared well whenever 
we visited it, and a good degree of progress was attained in 
the several branches attended to. The fall term was taught 
by Miss Draper, of the Intermediate, whose school was 
divided, thus giving more scholars and more work to this 
teacher. Although there were too many studies, yet she 
accomplished a good work, and will long be remembered by 
scholars and parents, as deserving of much esteem and 
respect, for her untiring efforts in behalf of the school, and 
we award her our hearty approval. 

The winter term was taught by Miss Hall, and now as 
before, her quiet manner gained for her the respect of most 
of her scholars. The school was a good success ; the 
scholars appeared well and made good progress, every prob- 
lem promptly and correctly worked and explained at the 
close of the school. The Committee were perfectly satisfied, 
and gave the school and teacher their unqualified approval. 
The scholars of this school manifested their respect for their 
teacher in the selection of a valuable present. 

South Primarv. — The spring term of this school was 

taught by .Miss Ada F. Goddard. This is a difficult school 

to govern, and needs a teacher of firmness and decision, 

which was found in Miss Goddard ; when visited the school 

4 



8 

appeared well, and good progress was made. The fall term 
was taught by Miss M. E. Edwards. She is a good teacher, 
and under her instruction the school made good progress. 
The winter term was taught by Miss Laura A. Brown. She 
failing to gain the interest of the scholars in their studies, 
did not get along as smoothly as we could have wished ; not, 
however, wholly the fault of the teacher. Some of the 
scholars need severe discipline ; and the school, the sympathy 
of the parents, which they failed to give. There was a mis- 
understanding in regard to the close, and there was no 
examination. 

South Intermediate. — This school enjoyed the advan- 
tages of the same teacher, for the spring and winter terms. 
The school was small ; hardly enough in the spring to create 
a healthy ambition to excel in the minds of the scholars, 
yet they seemed to make good progress in their studies. 
The teacher was earnest in her work, and elicited a good 
degree of approval from the Committee, at the several visits 
made. For the fall term the school was divided between the 
Primary and Grammar schools. 

South Grammar. — This school had the advantage of the 
same teacher throughout another year. This teacher and 
school has been reported in such high terms in previous 
reports, that nothing need be said by us. Suffice it to say, 
that when visited by us, and at the examinations, the school 
and the exercises of it were of such a character as to be 
above criticism. All the exercises were excellent, but the 
drawing of maps upon the blackboard, and the description 
of them, were splendid. The exercise in gymnastics was 
past description, and serves as a relief after hard study, and 
better prepares them for continued toil and study than any- 
thing else for the time spent iu the exercise. 

Centre Primary. — This school had the benefit of the 
same teacher, Miss Eudora K. Lawrence, throughout the 



year. She came well recommended, and fully sustained 
the recommendation. She went quietly, but earnestly, about 
her work, and under her instruction the scholars made good 
progress. Towards the close of the winter term there was 
a falling off in attendance, and the school lacked the support 
and sympathy of many of the parents, as is too often the 
case with this school, and which is necessary in order for the 
scholars to receive the full benefit of the school. Xo fault 
of the teacher produced this result. 

Cextee Grammar — The spring and fall terms of this 
school were taught by Miss Lizzie M. Priest. She was one 
who has had considerable experience in school teaching. 
Her method of governing and instructing met with the 
hearty approval of the Committee, and the examinations 
were of that high tone that need no criticism ; being prompt 
herself, she inculcated the same virtues in her scholars. 
The winter term was taught by Mr. E. A. Daniels, a younsr 
man of a quick, active mind and ready wit, and infused into 
the school an interest for study and the acquirement of 
knowledge and progress in whatever was undertaken, and a 
desire to excel, which we have not often witnessed in this 
school. The examination at the close gave evidence of thor- 
ough training, and a good practical knowledge of the studies 
pursued, and called forth the praise and admiration of the 
Committee and others present. 

East School. — This school has enjoyed the pleasure of 
having the same excellent teacher, Miss Mary A. Tinker, 
throughout the year, and a good and lasting benefit has been 
the result. This school, previous to the past year, has been 
below the average in deportment, and but little good accom- 
plished. But a complete revolution has been made, and the 
school at present, in many respects, is second to none in 
town. The exercises of the school, whenever the Committee 
have been present, have been very pleasing and above criti- 
cism. The examinations at the close were highly interesting, 



10 

and deservedly called forth the approbation of the Com- 
mittee and many of the parents of the district. Both teacher 
and scholars received the hearty approval of all present. 

South-East. — This school, in the spring term, was 
taught by Miss Hattie E. Handley. At its commencement 
it appeared very dull and uninteresting, and wanting in 
energy and activity. Later in the term there was a marked 
improvement, and toward its close it assumed a commendable 
appearance, and the teacher did herself and the school much 
credit by her quiet, yet earnest and persistent efforts to bring 
about so desirable a change. The fall and whiter terms were 
taught by Miss Allie H. Burnham. Under her thorough 
training and drill the school made rapid progress. The 
scholars became interested in their studies, and at the close 
of the school we were able to speak in high terms of the 
good order and marked progress of the school. The schol- 
ars showed an interest in their studies, and gave good 
evidence of having spent a pleasant and profitable term. 
The exercises were all very good, but the outline maps 
drawn by scholars from seven to twelve years of age, and 
exhibited, gave us much pleasure, proving that they had 
obtained correct ideas of Geography. Much of the benefit 
of the winter term was lost on account of sickness of a large 
number of the scholars, and the death of one, rendering it a 
necessity, almost, to close the school. Had it not been for 
this the school would have been far more pleasant and 
successful. 

North School. — This school was taught, in the spring 
and fall, by Miss Nellie Hosmer. This was her first experi- 
ence, and we heartily wished her success. There seemed to 
be a lack of sympathy between teacher and scholars, yet a 
good degree of study w r as manifest ; the school appeared well 
when visited, and at the close, had the discipline of the 
school been of a higher tone it would have added much to 
the credit of it and to our satisfaction. The winter term 



11 

was taught by Miss Junia S. Bartlett. She was an old 
experienced teacher, and knew how to adjust the school and 
put it in working order ; this she did, and whenever visited 
by us, found teacher and scholars laboring together toward a 
pleasant and profitable close. The school has not } r et fin- 
ished, but from the knowledge we have of it and what 
reports say of it, we have no fears in regard to its successful 
close, and give to it and its teacher our hearty approval. 

The column in the statistical table, showing the number 
of visits of parents and others, does not include the Super- 
intendent's visits each term. 

JOHN E. CUTTER, Chairman. 

L. W. STEVENS, 
JOHN WHITE, 
WILLIAM B. DAVIS, 
WILLIAM W. WORSTER, 

Committee. 
Acton, March 22, 1871. 



FINANCIAL. 



CENTRE SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 




Paid teacher, 


$469 25 


" for fuel, 


33 50 


Care of school-rooms, fires, &c, 


7 00 


Balance to new account, 


4 19 



$513 94 



$513 94 
John E. Cutter, Committee. 



EAST SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 



Paid teachers, 
" for fuel, 
" for care of room, fires, &c, 



$258 36 


8 


33 


$237 


21 


22 


80 


6 


68 



$266 69 



$26Q 69 
William B. Davis, Committee. 



Appi 
Balai 


SOUTH-EAST SCHOOl 

opriation, 

ice from last 3*ear, 

teachers, 
for fuel, 

for care of room, fires and furniture, 
ice to new account, 


$244 
47 


12 

86 


Paid 

a 
a 

Balai 


$240 00 

17 50 

6 25 

28 23 



$291 98 



$291 98 
John E. Cutter, Committee. 



13 



NORTH SCHOOL. 

Appropriation, $244 12 

Balance from last year, 3 89 

Paid teachers, 

" for fuel, 

" for care of room, fires, furniture, &c, 
Balance to new account, 



$225 00 


16 00 


5 35 


1 66 



$248 01 



$248 01 
John White, Committee. 



SOUTH SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 

Paid teachers, 

" for fuel, 

" care of rooms, fires, &c, 
Balance to new account, 



$669 62 


17 


66 


$587 50 


40 


05 


9 


03 


50 


70 



$687 28 



$687 28 
William W. Worster, Committee. 



WEST SCHOOL. 

Appropriation, $669 62 

Paid teachers, 

" for fuel, 

" for care of rooms, fires, &c, 
Balance to new account, 

$669 62 

L. W. Stevens, Committee. 



580 


00 


47 


74 


6 


00 


35 


88 



Amount of money raised by Town, $2,325 00 

Income from State School Fund, 185 54 

«■ " Dog Fund, 89 25 



Total for School purposes, $2,599 79 

Number of children reported by Assessors, between the ages of 
five and fifteen, 304. 

Sum appropriated by town for each scholar reported by Assessors, 
$7.65. 



14 



EOLL OF HONOR. 



Those who have been neith- 
er absent or tardy for 
one term. 



Those who have been neith- 
er absent or tardy for 
two terms. 



Those who have been neith- 
er absent or tardy for 
three terms. 



WEST PRIMARY. 



Nellie Walker, 


Cordelia Hayward, 


Edgar H. Hull, 


Lottie E. Handley, 


George Stockwell, 


George V. Mead, 


Mary S. Cutler, 


Fred E. Cutler, 


Fred S. Mead, 


Mattie I. Houghton, 


Clara Tuttle, 


E. Crosby Hoar. 


Laura Stockwell, 


Mary Tuttle. 




Ella Teele, 






lues Wyman, 






Alphonso Wyman, 






Charles Cobleigh, 






Herbert Taylor, 






Warren Taylor, 






Arthur Call, 






James P. Hayward, 






Freddie Cobleigh, 






Cornelia Hayward. 







WEST IXTERMEDIATE. 



John S. Hoar, 
Charles S. Hadley, 
Ella S. Teele. 



George Hutchins, 
Alphonso Wyman; 



WEST GRAMMAR 



Frank Davis, 


Warren A. Stevens, 




George Gardner, 


Emily Hall, 




Flora Davis, 


Nellie Handler, 




Florence Hayward, 


Emma Mead. 




Lizzie Eowell, 






Emma Stockwell, 






Lizzie Blauchard, 






Alice Call, 






G. Sumner Wright, 






Edwin Davis, 






George Hutchins. 







15 



Roll of Honor, continued. 



Those who have been neith- 
er absent or tardy for 
one term. 



Those who have been neith- 
er absent or tardy for 
two terms. 



Those who have been neith- 
er absent or tardy for 
three terms 



EAST SCHOOL 



Cora Fiske, 
G. D. Conant, 
P. H. Moore. 



OUTH-EAST 



Mary Fairbanks, 
Betsy Moulton, 
Emma Pratt. 



SOUTH GRAMMAR 



Emma J. Handley, 


Lizzie E. Fletcher, 


Georgie A. Gates. 


Daniel F. Hay ward, 


Lucy A. Jones, 




Anson Piper, 


Frank J. Butters, 




Wilbur F. Jones, 


Willie J. Rynn. 




Eugene R. Shapley. 







SOUTH INTERMEDIATE 



Michael Hannon, 
Willie Dow, 
Emma L. Billings, 
Daniel Piper, 
Walter Hayward. 



Frank Haynes, 
Frank Z. Taylor, 
John Rynn. 



SOUTH PRIMARY 



Charles Haynes, 
Usher J. Brown, 
Freddie A. Brown, 
George E. Haynes, 
Charles Hager, 
Henrietta Sawyer, 
Ella Clark, 
Alonzo Dow, 
Arthur Jones, 
Frank Harris, 
Charlie E. Worster. 



16 



Roll of Honor, continued. 



Those who have been neith- 
er absent or tardy for 



Those who have been neith- 
er absent or tardy for 
two terms. 



Those who have been neith- 
er absent or tardy for 
three terms. 



CENTRE GRAMMAR 



Herbert Fiske, 
Sophia Fletcher, 
Willie Sawyer, 
Arthur Tuttle, 
Arthur Pike, 
Carrie J. Palmer. 



Katie Kiusley. 



CENTRE PRIMARY. 



Alma Waldron, 
Hattie Smith. 



Ida A. Hale. 



NORTH SCHOOL 



Cora Rouillard, 
Elmer Rouillard, 
Oliver Dutton, 
Freddie Rouillard, 
Anna P. Cash, 
Lizzie Veasey. 



17 



TABLE 











ao 




- 


6 


00 






a 




at 


o 


- 




3 










"c 


w 












o 


■z, 


"o 


c 


z 


c 


P,i 


SCHOOLS. 


TEACHERS. 


c 

02^ 


s 

c 

s 


X 

Cm 

Z 


5 

9 


■A 

■— 


■i. 

- 


* o 






=~ a 


o 


i 


£ 


■— 










o o 




z 


t 


~z 


- 
- 
> 
Z 


o 






c 

o 


08 


% 


> 

* 


6 


6 


6 




Summer. 












^<-™ ) Grammar, 
ntre 1 Primary, 


Miss Lizzie M. Priest. 


2 1-4 


$30 


37 


30.9 




3 


8 


" Eudora K. Lawrence. 


21-4 


26 


39 


28.8 


2 




7 


( Grammar, 


" Edna M. Lowe. 


2 


32 


25 


21.5 




4 


7 


West < Intermediate. 


" Emma P. Draper. 


2 


28 


23 


21.5 






15 


( Primary, 


" Anna E. Hall. 


2 


25 


30 


28.5 






18 


I Grammar, 


" Amelia D. Comstock. 


2 1-4 


33 


27 


23.4 






3 


South j Intermediate, 


" Mary E. Edwards. 


2 


30 


17 


15.7 






4 


( Primary. 


" Ada F. Goddard. 


2 


27 


26 


22 






2 


East, 


" Marv A. Tinker. 


13-4 


32 


30 


28 




4 




South-East, 


" Hatfie E. Handley. 


2 1-4 


3J 


29 


21.3 




1 


5 


North, 


" Nellie Hosmer. 
Totals, 


2 


24 


19 


15 


2 


1 
13 


2 




22 3-4 


317 


302 


256.6 


71 




Fall. 
















Centre f Gramm ar, 
centre j Primarv> 


Miss Lizzie M. Priest. 


2 


30 


27 


22.6 






15 


•' Eudora K. Lawrence. 


2 


27 


38 


287 


2 




3 


w- jpsss?;- 


" Emma P. Draper. 


2 1-2 


32 


39 


35.5 






14 


" Anna E Hall. 


21-2 


3^ 


40 


37 3 


1 




14 


a-** isas? 


u Amelia D. Comstock. 


2 1-4 


33 


37 


32.7 




12 


11 


" Mary E. Edwards 


2 1-4 


30 


41 


38.5 






2 


East. 


" Mary A. Tinker. 


2 1-4 


32 


28 


24 




5 




South-East, 


" Allie E. Burnham. 


2 1-4 


30 


24 


19.9 






16 


North, 


" Nellie Hosmer. 
Totals, 


2 


24 


20 


17.9 


1 
4 


1 

1> 


7 




20 


207 


294 


257.1 


72 




Winter. 
















Centre | Grammar, 
1 Primary, 


Mr. E. A.Daniels. 


2 3-4 


55 


45 


41 




10 


14 


Miss Eudora K. Lawrence. 


2 3-4 


2* 


47 


30.8 






11 


( Grammar, 


•• Anna E.Hall. 


3 


35 


a5 


30 




14 


37 


West < Intermediate, 


' ; Carrie L. Whitcomb. 


3 


28 


25 


22.8 






27 


( Primary, 


" S. Jennie Wheeler. 


3 


22 


30 


27 3 






25 


( Grammar. 


' ; Amelia D. Comstock. 


3 


40 


35 


3 \3 




1> 


9 


South ] Intermediate, 


M Mary E. Edwards. 


2 1-2 


30 


27 


23 






2 


( Primary, 


" Laura A. Brown. 


2 1-2 


25 


23 


17.6 






9 


East. 


" Mary A. Tinker. 


2 3-4 


40 


36 


34 




9 




South-East, 


" Allie H. Burnham. 


3 1-2 


30 


26 


19 




1 


14 


North, 


" Juuia S. Bartlett. 
Totals, 


4 


32 


25 


22 




4 


23 




32 3-4 


365 


354 


297.8 




171 




Aggregate for the year. 


75 IT 


~940 


950 


811.6 


1 


96 


314~ 



Total average percentage of Attendance during the year, 



85.32 



REPORTS OF 

The Selectmen and other Officers 

OF TBJJ 

TOWN OF ACTON, 

FROM 

FEBRUARY 26, 1871, TO FEBRUARY 27, 1872, 

INCLUDING THE 

Marriages, Births and Deaths in 1871. 

ALSO, 

THE REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



BOSTON : 
TOLMAN & WHITE, PRINTERS, 221 WASHINGTON STREET. 

18 7 2. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



APPROPRIATIONS AND RECEIPTS. 


Unexpended balance of last year 


$4,426 26 


Regular Town Grant, 


4,000 00 


Town Grant for School Houses, 


4,000 00 


Town Grant for Schools, 


2,325 00 


Town Grant for Highways, 


1,500 00 


Temporary Loans, 


2,000 00 


State Tax, 


2,300 00 


County Tax, 


933 36 


Military Account, 


746 50 


State Aid to Jan. 1, 1871, 


250 00 


Corporation Tax, 


829 09 


Armoiy rent, 1870, 


150 00 


School Fund, 


160 83 


Use of Town Hall, 


105 78 


Dog Fund, 


125 03 


National Bank Tax, 


433 64 


From town of Stow, School Money, 


17 71 


From town of Concord, " 


15 00 


Surplus on order of Wm. Reed, of Westford 


12 80 


Overlay on Taxes, 


237 27 


Interest on Taxes for 1870, paid after Nov. 


1, 80 50 










EXPENDITURES. 

SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 

Paid W. H. Faulkner, South District, 
Wm. B. Davis, East " 

Winsor Pratt, South East " 
John E. Cutter, Centre " 
Luke Blanchard, West " 
John White, North " 















$24,648 77 



$651 02 
258 36 
229 63 
605 60 
605 60 
244 12 



$2,594 33 



SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS AND INCIDENTALS. 



Paid W. H. Faulkner, South District, 

Luke Blanchard, West " 

John E. Cutter, Centre, ' " 

" u East " 

John White, North <fc 



$58 23 
11 95 
18 08 

2 29 

3 87 



$94 42 



REPAIRS ON HIGHWAYS, 1870. 

Paid Isaac Reed, $107 65 

A. H. Jones, 26 80 

Isaac Reed, 1870, breaking roads, 1 20 



REGULAR HIGHWAY WORK, 1871. * 

Paid Reuben L. Reed, 
Levi W. Stevens, 
A. S. Fletcher, 
L. R. Forbush, 
Daniel Tuttle, 
Benjamin Hapgood, 
Daniel Harris, 
John F. Blood, 
John Harris, 
W. F. Flagg, 
E. J. Bobbins, 
Moses Taylor, 
T. P. Sawyer, 
E. H. Cutler, 
Francis Pratt, 



1871.1 


$75 40 


98 


60 


79 


60 


69 


75 


31 


00 


31 


60 


57 


42 


38 


00 


25 


00 


110 00 


24 


10 


24 40 


37 


95 


105 80 


70 


35 



$135 65 



$878 97 



SPECIAL BEPAIBS OF BOADS AND BBIDGES. 

Gravel Pit Boad. 

Paid A. L. Tuttle, labor and team, 
Blacksmith's bill, 
Powder and fuse, 
Town Farm, for labor and team, 
Other persons, labor, 



Crampton's Boad. 

Paid A. L. Tuttle, labor and team, 
Town Farm team, 
Powder, 

Sundry persons, labor, 
Bepairing cart for Crampton Bros., 

Paid Daniel Harris, for erecting road bounds 

near the house of Pope & Lyman, $2 50 

Joseph Noyes, work on road near the 

house of E. C. Parker, 117 25 

T. F. Lawrence, repairing sluice near 
the house of J. W. Wheeler, 9 00 



$276 67 


15 


32 


15 


66 


108 


45 


326 


62 


$70 00 


30 00 


4 


00 


82 


67 


4 


75 



$742 72 



$191 42 



Paid Daniel Fletcher, railing the road and re- 
pairing bridge at the powder mills, $43 75 

Joseph Noyes, for repairs on turnpike, 482 50 

Daniel Tuttle, work on the road from his 

house to the Common, 27 25 

Silas Conant, Jr., repairing sluice near 

R. Fiske's, 16 00 

L. W. Stevens, repairing sluice, cutting 
brush, and repairing road near West 
Acton, 11 00 

W. F. Flagg, re-laying two sluices near 

land of Ithamar Robbins, 13 50 

C. Fletcher & Co., lumber for railing 

road at the powder mills, 40 79 

J. Noyes, for plank, powder mill bridge, 40 58 
" repairs on road near the pow- 
der mills, 9 00 

W. W. Davis, work on the road from his 

house to house of T. Kinsley, 37 94 

Simon Tuttle, for lumber for railing road 

near mills of Hugh Cash, 16 80 

Francis Pratt, work on road near the 

powder mills, 70 35 

A. S. Fletcher, repairing sluice, 8 00 



$946 21 



COST OF ROADS CONSTRUCTED BY ORDER OF COUNTY 
COMMISSIONERS. 

Paid W. D. Tuttle, making profile and setting 

grade stakes at TV. Acton, $9 00 

Reuben Handley, work, 300 00 

Joseph Noyes, railing the new road at 

W. Acton, 55 61 

Luther Conant, work on new road near 

Wetherbee's mills, 122 70 

$487 31 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 

Paid Luther Conant, for Mrs. Sarah B. Childs, $12 75 
Mrs. C. H. Conant,' for board of Chas. 

Edmonds, 12 weeks, 30 00 

John Daily, for board of John Reynolds, 

8J weeks, 49 70 

Luther Conant, for house rent of Mrs. 

Sarah White, at Worcester, 52 00 



6 



Paid Dr. Cowdrey, attendance of John Malo- 

ney, a State pauper, $14 00 

Dr. Cowdrey, attendance of John Rey- 
nolds, a State pauper, 25 00 

Dr. H. F. Barrett, surgical assistance to 

John Reynolds,. 10 00 

Luther Conant, journey to Lawrence, 
respecting Mrs. Geo. Desmond and 
family, 3 50 



$196 95 



EXPENSES OF TOWN FARM. 

Paid Potter & Hopkins, for horse cart harness, $19 50 

Luther Conant, road scraper, 10 00 

Town farm, deficiency for 1870-71, 152 18 

Yoke of oxen, 225 00 
Francis D wight, for coffin and robe for 

Rhoda Burnham, 15 00 







DEBT. 




INTEREST ON 


TOWN 




Paid Augustine Conant, 




$292 00 


J. K. Putney. 




39 


00 


James E. Billings, 




70 


61 


Isaac T. Flagg, 




12 


00 


Lydia R. Keyes, 




42 


80 


Frederick Rouillard, 




102 


00 


Elizabeth Hanscom, 




40 


80 


Daniel Harris, 




48 


32 


Cyrus Conant, adm'r, 




140 


00 


Calvin Harris, 




12 


00 


D. M. Handley, 




102 


00 


J. R. Whitcomb, 




30 


00 


J. E. Cutter, interest on temporary loans, 54 


57 


Luther Billings, 




12 


00 


William Wheeler, 




30 


00 


TOWN 


DEBT. 






Paid temporary loans, 




$2,000 00 


James E. Billings, 




100 


00 


Lydia R. Keyes, 




500 


00 



$421 68 



$1,028 10 



$2,600 00 



MILITARY ACCOUNT. 

Paid John Fletcher, Jr., armory rent, $150 00 

For May parade and Fall encampment, 746 50 



$896 50 



olman 



PRINTING. 



Paid Tolman & White, for town warrants and 

reports, for March and April, 1871, $102 50 
Tolman & White, for warrants for June 



and November meetings, and notices 
for the meeting for sufferers by the 
Chicago fire, 



6 50 

















STATE AID. 




Paid Rebecca C. Wright, 






$48 00 


Joanna Moulton, 






48 


00 


Nancy 


B. Richards, 






96 


00 


H. Brooks, guardian of M. 


Monroe, 


48 


00 


H. W. 


Wilder, 






96 


00 


H. W. 


Wetherbee, 






12 


00 









CEMETERY EXPENSES. 

Paid Martin Pike, for work in the East Ceme- 
tery, 

Martin Pike, for mowing brush in North 
East Cemetety, 

Samuel Hosmer, stakes for cemetery, 

C. Hastings, for work in West Ceme- 
tery in 1870-71, 

Davis & Hosmer, iron work for cemetery, 

Francis Dwight, two gates for cemeter}', 

Francis Jones, painting new gates for do., 

H. M. Smith, grading avenues, 

Daniel Tuttle, 

T. Kinsley, 

H. D. Parlin, 

Julien Tuttle, 

W. W. Davis, 

Joseph Reed, 

Luke Smith, 

Three stone posts, 



$30 10 



5 


20 


2 


39 


35 


00 


9 


38 


10 


00 


1 


60 


4 00 


13 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


7 


00 


3 


50 


36 


00 


3 


00 



$109 00 



$348 00 



$168 17 



TOWN OFFICERS. 

Paid John E. Cutter, superintending schools, 
Samuel Hosmer, taking invoice and 

making taxes, 
W. D. Tuttle, services as Town Clerk, 
J. E. Cutter, Collector of Taxes, 
Do., do., taking invoice and making taxes, 
Luther Conant, services as Selectman, 
E. J. Bobbins, " " 

Joseph Noyes, " " 



$90 00 



33 


45 


25 


00 


80 


00 


50 
36 


00 

00 


20 


00 


20 


00 



$354 45 



Paid 



TOWN HOUSE EXPENSES. 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, for paint 

furnished in 1870, 
G. W. Sawyer, 35 gallons oil, 
Do., 1 cord of wood and cutting same, 
Do., washing floors, 
Do., taking care of Town clock, 
Do., repairing roof on Town House, 
Do., cleaning Town clock, 
Do., opening Town Hall and Committee 

Boom sixty- four times, 
Do., taking care of cellar, 
Do., tolling bell eight times, 
Do., lamp-wicks, 
Do., one broom, 
J. E. Cutter, coal for Town Hall, 



CENTBE SCHOOL HOU! 

Paid H. M. Smith, 

E. P. Bullard, for land, 

Estimated value of old house, 

" U remaining materials, 



$15 13 




12 25 




8 00 




5 00 




10 00 




2 50 




1 50 




34 75 




3 00 




1 60 




64 




50 




27 98 






$122 85 


'SE. 
$6,950 00 


225 00 






$7,175 00 


$500 00 




50 00 





MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid for gravestones for T. Williams and 

Mrs. John Brown, $52 00 

Lemuel Pope, appropriation for Deco- 
ration Day, 150 00 

W. D. Tuttle, express on public docu- 
ments, 2 60 



Paid W.D.Tuttle, stamp on H.Brooks' deed, $0 50 
Do., trip to Sudbury to make out certifi- 
cate of election, 
Do., postage and express, 
Do., collecting and recording 40 births 

at 30c, 
Do., recording 29 deaths, 
Do., " 14 marriages, 

Do., stationery, 
J. E. Cutter for insurance of Centre 

School House 5 years, 
Do., copying Assessors' book, 1870, 
Do., for abatement of taxes for 1869, 
Do., " " 1870, 

Do., for notifying Town officers to take 

oath of office, 
Do., for team for County Commissioners 

to Westford road, 
Do., for express, 
Do., Collector's book, 
Do., error on County tax, 1870, 
Luther Conant, stationery and postage, 
Cutler Bros., for rent of school room, 
Francis Dwight, for attending funerals 

for 26 persons, 
Do., making returns of 25 deaths, 
Do., for repairing hearse, 



2 


50 




74 


12 


00 


4 


90 


2 


10 


1 


00 


177 


50 


9 


00 


53 


62 


111 


73 


3 


12 


2 


00 


1 


00 


1 


60 


2 


97 


1 


00 


50 


00 


78 


00 


2 


50 


4 


50 



$736 88 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES FROM FEB. 26, 1871, 
TO FEB. 26, 1872. 

Unexpended balance as per report of Feb. 26, 1871, $4,426 26 
Appropriations, 12,575 00 

Other receipts, 7,647 51 

324,648 77 



EXPENDITURES. 

Support of schools, - * 82,594-33 
Repairs of school houses and incidentals, 94 42 
Repairs on higkway, 1870, 135 65 
Regular highway work, 1871, 878 97 
Special repairs of highwa}*s and bridges, 1,880 35 
Building roads by order of County Commis- 
sioners, 487 31 



10 



Support of poor, 


$196 95 


Expenses of Town farm, 


421 68 


Interest, 


1,028 10 


Printing, 


109 00 


Military, 


896 50 


State aid, 


348 00 


Cemetery, 


168 17^ 
354 45 1 


Town officers, 


Town House, 


122 85 


Centre schoolhouse, 


7,175 00 


Miscellaneous, 


736 88 


State tax, 


2,300 00 


County tax, 


933 36 


Town debt and temporary loans, 


2,600 00 




ft°3 4ft1 ( )7 






Balance in treasury Feb. 27, 1872, 


$1,186 80 


TOWN DEBT. 




Ebenezer Conant, 


$2,067 66 


Augustine Conant, 


4,135 33 


Daniel Harris, 


840 86 


Frederick Rouillard, 


1,778 10 


Joel Hanscom, 


700 40 


James E. Billings, 


2,132 07 


David M. Handle} 7 , 


1,745 90 


Isaac T. Flagg, 


111 50 


Calvin Harris, 


202 60 


John R. Whitcomb, 


506 50 


Jonas K. Putney, 


687 37 


William Wheeler, 


523 00 


Owe for new road at West Acton, 


200 00 


• 


fti *t fim °i 




qj> 1 lI,00 1 L\f 


Amount due from State aid, 


$348 00 


From State, care of sick State paupers, 


75 00 


Estimated value of Old Centre School House 


and surplus materials, 


550 00 


Due from Treasurer, 


1,186 80 




fco 1 ^q or) 






Balance against the Town, 


$13,171 49 



LUTHER CONANT, )., . 
E. J. ROBBINS. {selectmen 

JOSEPH NOYES, ) 0J JLCWn ' 



Acton, Feb. 27, 1872. 



REPORT OF THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

AT THE 

ALMSHOUSE IN ACTON 

For the Year ending April 1, 1872. 



ARTICLES ON HAND, APRIL 1, 1872. 

12 cows, $576.00 ; horse, 250.00 ; shotes, 20.00 

4 tons hay, 130.00 ; 23 bushels ashes, 5.75, 

2 turkeys, 5.00; 26 hens, 19,50, 

150 lbs. pork, 18.00 ; 170 lbs. bacon, 20.40, 

100 bush, potatoes, 40.00: soap, 2.50 ; butter, 14.00, 

Corned beef, 4.00 ; flour, 4.00 ; sugar, 2.00, 

2 bush, beans, 6.00 ; lard, 3.85, 



$846 


00 


135 


75 


24 


50 


38 


40 


56 


50 


10 


00 


9 


85 



81,121 00 



RECEIPTS. 

Milk, 8925.15 ; teaming milk, 84.00, 
Apples, 106.00 ; potatoes, 30.50 ; berries, 51.50, 
Grapes, 8.00 ; tomatoes, 4.81 ; sweet corn, 2.52, 
Turkeys, 26.60 ; pig, 6.00 ; calves, 17.33 ; cows, 78.00, 
Eggs, 2.04 ; peas, 3.90 ; lard, 4.20 ; oxen, 160.32, 
Hoop poles, 10.00 ; slabs, .60 ; cabbages, 2.00, 
Shorts, 1.19; labor, 11.50, 
From estate of Rhoda Burnham, 
Labor on Gravel Pit Road, 

Work of team on Gravel Pit and Crampton Roads, 
" Centre School-house, 



Received from treasury to pay for oxen, 

81,951 36 



$1,009 


15 


188 


00 


15 


33 


127 


93 


170 


46 


12 


60 


12 


69 


14 


25 


12 


00 


126 45 


37 


50 


$1,726 36 


225 


00 



(11) 



12 



EXPENDITURES. 

For Cider, .60 ; cushion 1.00 ; pump, 6.50 ; paid Rev. 
Mr. Wood, 2.00, 
Stove lining, .87 ; pasturing cows, 26.00 ; pair of 

shafts, 2.00, 
Saw, 1.00; oatmeal, .50; shingles, 19.40; labor 

shingling, 6.25, 
Rep'g plow, 1.50 ; tin ware, 1.50 ; gobbler, 2.25, 
Rep'g door, 2.85 ; plants, 2.50 ; hay cutter, 3.00, 
Quilts, 5.45 ; whips, .57 ; sawdust, .24, 
Filing saw, 1.20 ; rep'g pumps, 5.00 ; bucket, .58, 
Beans, 4.84 ; nails, .80 ; pails, .63 ; grass seed, 4.03, 

Garden seeds, 1.30 ; barrels, .40 ; hoe, .58 ; cast- 
ings, .93 ; wash tub, 1.25, 

Crackers, 3.69; turnip seed, 32; onions, 1.63; 
polish, .16 ; rope, .50, 

Can of ink, 1.80 ; plow, 15.00 ; haying tools, 4.01 ; 
flypaper, .15, 

Squash, .24 ; earthen ware, 2.80 ; rosin, .40 ; 
glass, 1.19 ; axe, 1.33, 

Hardware, .45; saltpetre, .15; tub, 1.20; putty, 
.08 ; broom, .42, 

Clothing, 28.96 ; boots and shoes, 10.50 ; salt, 
7.71 ; blacksmith's bill, 26.92, 

Shoeing oxen, 9.75 ; shotes, 22.00 ; part of har- 
ness, 11.25, 

Repairjof harness, 3.75 ; posts, .90 ; New England 
Farmer 2 years, 5.00, 

Plaster, 4.95 ; hoe, .60 ; shovel, 1.00 ; twine, .30 ; 
axle grease, .25, 

Lemons, 26 ; butchering hogs, 2.00 ; mustard, .25 ; 
cocoa, .46, 

Cream tartar, .13 ; raisins, 1.42 ; yeast, .54 ; Med- 
icine, 4.92, 

Thread, .21 ; soap, 4.36 ; pepper, .58 ; starch, 56 ; 
ginger, .56, 

Matches, 3.00 ; saleratus, 1.56 ; cloves, .29 ; cas- 
sia, .49, 

Pimento, .20 ; nutmegs, .56 ; potatoes, 37.46 ; 
flour, 47.75, 

Corn, 4.20 ; rye, 2.70 ; oats, 11.31 ; hen feed, 2.50, 

Shorts, 68.34 ; oil meal, 215.45 ; molasses, 21.13, 

Cotton cloth, 9.45; meat, 112.14; rice, 1.05; 
fish, 10.12, 

Coffee, 1.56; vinegar, 3.65; oil, 8.00; butter, 
67.10, 

Cheese, 23.71 ; tobacco, 15.99 ; tea, 15.05, 



$10 10 


28 87 


27 15 

5 25 
8 35 

6 26 

6 78 
10 83 


4 46 


6 30 


20 96 


5 96 


2 30 


74 09 


43 00 


9 65 


7 10 


2 97 


7 01 


6.27 


5 34 


85 97 

20 71 

304 92 


132 76 


80 31 
54 75 



13 



For Sugar, 36.58 ; corn meal, 242.25 ; grinding, 1.65, 
Dr. Cowdrey's bill, 21.50 ; labor, 167.50, 
Drag, 7.00 ; hay and grain for oxen, 39.65, 
Cows, 80.00 ; oxen, 225.00, 
Services of "William H. Blood and wife, 
Luther Conant, making Report to Board of State 

Charities, and Report to the Town, 
Luther Conant, for services as Overseer of the Poor 
Elbridge J. Robbins, 
Joseph Noyes, 



u u 



Total amount of Receipts, 

Drawn from treasury to balance account, 
" " pay for oxen, 

Income less than Expenditures, 

Interest on the Farm, 
Drawn from Treasury, 



Victualling 175 travellers, 

Due from State for care of John Maloney, 



Cost of supporting Poor on Farm, 

Whole number of persons, exclusive of travellers, supported in 
the Almshouse, six ; average number, four ; present number, 
three. 



$280 48 

189 00 

46 65 

305 00 

325 00 

6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 


$2,154 55 
1,951 36 


$203 19 
225 00 


$428 19 

$239 40 
428 19 


$667 59 

$87 50 
25 00 


$112 50 
$555 09 



LUTHER CONANT, i Overseers 

ELBRIDGE J. ROBBINS, } of 
JOSEPH NOYES, j Poor. 



Acton, April 1, 1872. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



BIRTHS RECORDED IN 1871. 

No. Date of Birth. Name of Child. Names of Parents. 

1. Jan. 6, Hattie Elmira Tuttle, daughter of Julian and Hannah 

E. Tuttle. 

2. Jan. 18, Henry Lauriston Livermore, son of George W. and 

Carrie A. Livermore. 

3. Feb. 3, Bertha Louise Gardner, daughter of George and Vio- 

letta F. Gardner. 

4. March 2, Charles Simon Moulton, son of John D. and Hannah 

D. Moulton. 

5. March 7, Patrick Coughlan, son of John and Margaret Cough- 

Ian. 

6. March 9, George W. Richardson, son of Osman D. and Mary 

E. Richardson. 

7. March 10, Willie Swift Fletcher, son of Aaron S. and Sarah 

T. Fletcher. 

8. March 22, Lucius Graham Coburn, ) , . , ., -, - T 

9. Everett Wetherbee Coburn, \ twm chlldren of Jas " 

D. and Marietta M. Coburn. 

10. March 27, Daniel Edward Jones, son of Daniel and Maria T. 

Jones. 

11. April 6, Stephen Travers, son of Stephen and Catherine Trav- 

ers. 

12. April 21, Henrietta Estella Cutler, daughter of David C. and 

Estella A. Cutler. 

13. April 25, Hattie Florence Fike, daughter of George M. and 

Charlotte M. Pike. 

14. May 2, Blanche Maide Bassett, daughter of Joseph R. and 

Clara Bassett. 

15. May 5, Fred Lincoln Whitcomb, son of Alben L. and Martha 

M. Whitcomb. 

16. May 15, Mary Jane Dooley, daughter of Richard and Joanna 

Dooley. 

17. May 21, a daughter to William H. and Jane Staples. 

18. June 8, William Milnes, son of William and Maria Milnes. 

19. June 16, Jessie Edith Currie, daughter of Neil and Mary.E. 

Currie. 

20. June 14, Fred Walter Teel, son of William H. and Mary E. 

Teel. 

(14) 



15 

21. Jul} 7 6, Albert Eugene Bobbins, son of Levi H. and Mary C. 

Bobbins. 

22. July 21, Levi Lincoln Pratt, son of Windsor F. and Mary B. 

Pratt. 

23. Aug. 5, Bichard P. Lyman, son of Charles P. and Lucy E. 

Lyman. 

24. Aug. 24, Jane Baddin, daughter of Patrick and Hannah Bad- 

din. 

25. Sept. 3, Boy Stanwood Whitcomb, son of Elwyn H. and Mary 

F. Whitcomb. 

26. Sept. 19, a daughter to William and Henrietta Wilkins. 

27. Oct. 1, Charley Jones Fletcher, son of Aaron J. and Mary E. 

Fletcher. 

28. Oct. 1, Freddie Ernest Fletcher, son of Chas. W. and Angeline 

H. Fletcher. 

29. Oct. 2, Edith Frances Coulter, daughter of Hugh and Mary 

M. Coulter. 

30. Oct. 3, Bertram Delette Hall, son of Delette H. and Susie A. 

Hall. 

31. Oct. 14, Mabel Louise Bobinson, daughter of Charles and Per- 

sis V. Bobinson. 

32. Oct. 20, Clarence Augustine Hosmer, son of Augustine and 

Susie H. Hosmer. 

33. Oct. 31, in Winchendon, Florence Adelia Bichardson, daugh- 

ter of James E. and Sara B. Bichardson. 

34. Nov. 1, James Daley, son of John and Ellen Daley. 

35. Nov. 7, Alice Josephine Hoar, daughter of John S. and Lydia 

P. Hoar. 

36. Nov. 11, Harry Ernest Knowlton, son of George W. and An- 

gie H. Knowlton. 

37. Nov. 23, Mary Ella Counter, daughter of John W. and Alice 

E. J. Counter. 
Males, 22 ; females, 15 ; total, 37. 



MABBIAGES BECOBDED IN 1871. 

No. Date of Marriage. Names of Parties. 

1. Jan. 9, Mr. Henry Veo, of 'Concord, and Miss Julia Hag- 

gerty, of Acton. 

2. Jan. 9, Mr. Michael Muna}* and Miss Minnie Wells, both of 

Concord. 

3. March 3, Mr. Thomas Clifford and Miss Katie McGraw, both 

of Acton. 

4. March 5, Mr. Lewis Boucher and Miss Lilia A. Taylor, both 

of Acton. 



16 



5. April 20, Mr. Frank F. Hay ward, of Acton, and Miss Emily 

N. Rogers, of Charlestown. 

6. April 23, Mr. Bixby S. Woodward and Mrs. Hattie A. Brad- 

ford, both of Acton. 

7. May 7, Mr. John Haggert}', of Hudson, and Miss Mary Man- 

gin, of Acton. 

8. Aug. 6, Mr. W. A. S. Cutter and Miss Clara E. Stone, both of 

Acton. 

9. Sept. 11, Mr. James Tenney and Miss Katie Hyde, both of 

Acton. 

10. Oct. 2, Mr. Frank H. Young, of Jay, Vt., and Miss Mary A. 

Young, of Newport, Vt. 

11. Oct. 19, Mr. Alfred Sawyer, of Acton, and Miss Lucy A. 

Walker, of Sudbury. 

12. Nov. 19, Mr. Henry C. Wheeler, of Acton, and Miss Sarah J. 

Tibbetts, of Concord. 

13. Nov. 22, Mr. Hiram J. Hapgood and Miss Augusta A. Parker, 

both of Acton. 

14. Dec. 31, Mr. Robert Chaffin and Mrs* Mary W. Handley, both 

of Acton. 



DEATHS REGISTERED IN 1871. 

No. Date of Death, Name of Deceased. 

1. Jan. 27, Miss Georgiana Reed, aged 29 yrs. 3 mos. 11 days. 

2. Jan. 30, Honor a Calanan, aged 4 yrs. 6 mos. 5 days. 
- 3. Feb. 2, Mrs. Ann Reed, aged 67 yrs. 9 months. 

4. Feb. 4, John Calanan, son of Daniel and Ellen Calanan, aged 

10 mos. 3 da3's. 

5. March 6, Mr. Samuel Haynes, aged 70 }ts. 

6. March 26, George W., son of Osman D. and Mary E. Rich- 

ardson, aged 17 days. 

7. April 12, Mrs. Charlotte H. Crampton, aged 57 yrs. 6 mos. 

12 days. 

8. April 29, Mrs. Elizabeth M. Shattuck, aged 70 yrs. 8 mos. 17 

days. 

9. May 8, Miss Nellie J. Hanscom, aged 14 years. 

10. June 4, Miss Lucinda Hosmer, aged 67 }-ears. 

11. June 28, Mr. Jonas Heald, aged 80 yrs. 8 mos. 16 days. 

12. June 30, John, son of David and Bridget Rynn, aged 11 yrs. 

3 mos. 18 days. 

13. July 14, Mr. William H. Reed, aged 35 yrs. 

14. Aug. 20, Mr. Francis Kinsley, aged 18 yrs. 9 mos. 

15. Aug. 21, John M., son of Luther R. and Louisa M. Forbush. 

aged 11 yrs. 2 mos. 17 days. 

16. Aug. 22, Miss Lizzie Flagg, aged 20 yrs. 8 mos. 



17 

17. Aug. 30, Lucius G., son of James D. and Marietta M. Coburn, 

aged 5 mos. 8 days. 

18. Sept. 4, Charles F., son of Freeman L. and Amelia A. Ran- 

dall, aged 1 }T. 1 month, 9 days. 

19. Sept. 18, Everett W., son of James D. and Marietta M. Co- 

burn, aged 5 mos. 26 days. 

20. Sept. 20, a daughter of William and Henrietta Wilkins, 1 da}'. 

21. Sept 28, Evelyn W. Karcher, daughter of Charles F. and Mary 

A. Karcher, aged 8 mos. 18 days. 

22. Oct. 1, Mrs. Lucinda Jones, widow of Silas Jones, aged 84 yra. 

23. Oct. 19, Mrs. Catherine Cutter, aged 76 yrs. 10 mos. 11 days. 

24. Oct. 24, Mrs. Rhoda Burnham, aged 94 years. 

25. Oct. 26, Mr. Nathaniel T. Law, aged 62 yrs. 11 mos. 17 days. 

26. Oct. 27, Charles H. Dibble, son of Philo and Clementine Dib- 

ble, aged 11 mos. 2 days. 

27. Oct. 31, Mr. Levi Wetherbee, aged 86 yrs. 

28. Nov. 26, Mrs. Susanna C. Chaffin, aged 71 yrs. 5 mos. 

29. Dec. 3, Mr. Hiram W. Wetherbee, aged 51 yrs. 11 mos. 



DOGS LICENSED IN 1871. 

Males, 63, at $2 each, $126 00 

Females, 5, at $5 " 25 00 



Total, 68 $151 00 

Clerk's fees, at 20 cents each, $13 60 



Paid in to County Treasurer, $137 40 

WM. D. TUTTLE, Town Cleric. 



THE ANNUAL REPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



TOWN OF ACTON, 



SCHOOL-YEAR 1871-72. 



BOSTON: 

TOLMAN & WHITE, PRINTERS, 221 WASHINGTON STREET. 

1872. 



REPORT. 



To the Citizens of Acton: 

In obedience to the requirements, both of custom and law, 
the School Committee of Acton make this their Annual 
Report. 

They are happy to be able to state that the schools, with 
two or three exceptions, have been successful, while in some 
of them a marked degree of progress has been manifest. But 
there is more or less difficulty connected with the task of 
securing good teachers ; and the difficulty is increasing every 
year, because other occupations offer more permanent employ- 
ment, and in many instances more lucrative, with less criti- 
cisms and less annoying circumstances connected therewith. 
Teachers are constantly changing, and if we get a good 
teacher we are not sure of her more than a term or two, ere 
some other committee, with a little more money, takes her 
away ; for so far as our knowledge and experience goes, 
teachers' wages are lower in our immediate vicinity than in 
many other places. 

Another reason, which renders it difficult to secure jxros- 
perous schools, is the fact that parents do not lend their aid 
and influence on the side of the teacher, and drop a word or 
two detrimental to their ability to teach a school ; and by so 
doing encourage the scholars to a degree of disrespect which 
makes it next to impossible for a teacher to maintain good 
order, gain the respect of his or her scholars, stimulate them 
to an earnest endeavor to improve themselves, and make the 
best use of the time allotted them for school purposes. 

The importance of this subject demands the sober, serious 
attention of parents, and we hope and trust that it will re- 
ceive it. The school also demands frequent visits from 



parents and friends of the scholars, and must receive them, 
if we would secure the greatest benefit from our schools. 
We too frequently get wrong impressions of the school, by 
taking reports that come to us on the wings of the wind ; but 
rather let us often visit the school room and see for ourselves, 
and speak an encouraging word to those gathered there, and 
our word for it you will feel a greater degree of satisfaction, 
and confer a blessing on the school of untold value. Another 
reason is the fact, that tardiness and absences in some 
schools are so frequent, that much of the value of the school 
is lost. If you would watch the progress of a school where 
the scholars are always prompt and punctual in their attend- 
ance, and one the reverse of this, we think those whose duty 
it is to see that scholars are prompt, would see such a differ- 
erence in favor of the former that they would spare no pains 
or expense to make our schools of such a character, and thus 
secure much more benefit from them. We want to bring 
the standard of our schools to a higher grade than they now 
are ; and in order to do this let us parents, one and all, in- 
terest ourselves in this matter, and do what we can to bring 
about so desirable a result. 

Music. 
It is desirable to secure teachers, as far as possible, that 
are able to practice singing and teach the same to their schol- 
ars ; yet we would not make it one of the requisites of a 
good teacher, but think no one can fail to see a decided dif- 
ference in schools (other things being equal) , and give the 
preference to those where singing is practised. None can 
sing unless the}' feel pleasant and happy, and they do not 
wish to lose the exercise ; therefore the tendencies are that all 
parties will feel better, and everything in the school room 
will be done with a better relish because of the singing. 

Text Books. 
The only change that has been made in text books the past 
year is the removal of Robinson's Intellectual Arithmetic, 



which was a very difficult book for the place, and Eaton's 
introduced in its stead, at the commencement of the school 
year ; and your Committee are of the opinion that the change 
was a good one, and many of the teachers agree with them 
in regard to the matter. 

Discipline. 
It is of the highest importance that good order should be 
maintained in our common schools ; all will agree in regard 
to the fact, but how to maintain it is the question that puz- 
zles us more than anything else at the present time. Many 
will clamor loudly for good order in our schools, while their 
government of two or three children at home is very laxative, 
and would not be tolerated by them in school for a single day. 
But what is to be done ? It is all right when somebody's 
else child is the mark, but a different thing when you meddle 
with my child. Corporal punishment at the present day is 
unpopular, and the idea is fast creeping into our schools that 
scholars are not to be punished at all, do what they will, and 
some of the parents, just as soon as their children are 
touched, are offended at the teacher and waylay him or her 
on their way to their boarding-place, and give them a piece 
of their mind in no very gentle terms, and take their chil- 
dren from school. So long as this is practised so long we 
shall have trouble in our schools. A better way, in our 
judgment, would be to keep your children at school, although 
you felt that all was not quite right, and to seek a private 
interview with the teacher, talk the matter over and set 
things right, and not blaze it about so that the scholars get 
the impression that the teacher is not of much account and 
stands very low in the estimation of their parents. 

School Houses. 

Perhaps nothing need be said in regard to school houses, 

as the subject is now before the town. One house was built 

year before last, and one in the centre of the town last year, 

and the prospect now is that two more will be built this year. 



We would advise a liberal expenditure in the erection of the 
houses, yet not so extravagant but that enough may remain 
for furniture of the rooms, such as globes, wall maps, mot- 
toes, &c, which are very much needed, and have not yet 
been furnished, except in one instance, that of the East 
district. 

We will now take a glance at the schools and the teachers 
of the past year. 

East School. — The Spring and Fall terms were taught by 
Miss Mary A. Tinker, who taught the year previous. Under 
her excellent training the school gained rapidly in the differ- 
ent branches taught, and although at the close sickness called 
her suddenly away, with no examination, yet from the fre- 
quent visits your Committee made, and knowledge gained 
from other sources, we do not hesitate to say that good 
progress was made, and scholars and teacher passed the time 
pleasantly and profitably to themselves and all interested in 
the school. The Winter term was taught by Miss R. S. 
Cutler, who came to us well recommended, and fully sus- 
tained her reputation as a teacher, as the frequent visits and 
closing examination of the Committee can fully testify. 
Also, quite a number of the parents present at the close of 
the school expressed themselves well satisfied with the 
progress made, and a desire that she should return in the 
Spring. We also concur in this desire. 

South- East. — The Spring term of this school was taught 
by Miss Allie H. Burnham, its former teacher. She went 
quietly, yet earnestly about her labors, and fully sustained 
her previous well-earned reputation. The teacher and schol- 
ars seemed interested in each other, and each desirous to 
accomplish a good degree and amount of labor. This we 
think was secured, as the visits of the Committee can fully 
testify. The Fall term was taught by Miss Lizzie W. Beane, 
whose abilities to teach were not questioned, but who failed 



to gain the respect of her pupils, consequently the order 
was not quite as good as we would like to have seen it ; yet 
the school was not a failure, and a fair amount of work was 
accomplished, and we trust that the experience of this term 
will be serviceable to her in the future. The Winter term 
was taught by Miss Alice C. Preston. Her reputation of 
former terms was very good and we hoped that she would 
succeed admirably, but for some reason she failed to gain 
the respect of her pupils and interest them in their studies, 
so that when visited the order was too laxative, and a lack 
of life and interest in scholars and teacher was manifest 
throughout the term. 

North. — This school was taught in the Spring and Fall 
by Miss Ella F. Reed, a resident of the district, and we 
feared for her success, but as the term advanced we saw that 
our fears were groundless, and that the teacher and schol- 
ars became interested in each other, and in their labors, and, 
although this was her first experience in teaching, a good 
degree of labor was accomplished which was attended by 
success throughout both terms. The Winter term was 
taught by Miss Junia S. Bartlett, who has had much experi- 
ence in school teaching, and under whose training the school 
made rapid progress. When visited at the commencment, 
and at the close, the school appeared well ; good order and 
success attended her labors during the term, and we gave the 
school our hearty approval. The scholars showed their re- 
spect and esteem for their teacher by giving her a well 
selected present at the close of the exercises on examination 
day. 

South Primary. — The Spring term was taught by Miss 
M. A. Edwards, who was well recommended, and entered 
upon her labors with a good degree of earnestness, and al- 
though no examination was had, yet evidence of her ability 
to teach and earnestness in her work were manifest when- 
ever we visited the school, and fair success followed her la- 



8 

bors. The Fall and Winter terras were taught by Miss 
Lottie C. Faulkner, who possesses, in an uncommon degree, 
the faculty and ability to teach and interest her pupils ; and 
we think we never visited a primary school where we were 
so well pleased, and where the pupils were so well drilled, 
and seemed to understand what they were doing so well, as 
this school. Her manner of object teaching was excellent. 
The teacher and school received the approval of the Com- 
mittee and others present, and we trust that what has been 
learned will be remembered, and practised in after years. 

South Grammar. — This school has enjoyed the pleasure 
of having the same teacher throughout the whole year. 
The teacher, Miss Comstock, has often, and for some time, 
been before the town in a number of reports, and is there- 
fore too well known to need any remarks from us. There is 
a thoroughness of manner about this teacher and school 
which is very commendable, and the exercises were of such 
a character as to need no criticism. 

West Primary. — This school has had only one teacher, 
Miss S. Jennie Wheeler, throughout the year. Her school 
was large, too large for the. room, and the scholars were 
somewhat crowded during the Winter term. But although 
she had these difficulties to contend with, her order was 
good, the pupils seemed interested in their studies, and the 
teacher labored hard and accomplished a good work. The 
school appeared well when visited by the Committee, and at 
the close the teacher and scholars received the approval of 
the Committee and of many parents who were present. 

West Grammar. — This school has had three teachers dur- 
ing the year. The Spring term was taught by Miss Annie 
E. Hall, an old and a good teacher, possessed of amiable 
qualities of mind, and kind almost to a fault, if such a thing 
were possible. Some of the scholars took advantage of 
her kindness in such a way as to make the discipline of the 



school quite hard, her duties being arduous by having too 
many classes. Your Committee dropped one study, put two 
classes together, thereby reducing the number of classes 
to three less than at first. She labored hard and accom- 
plished a work for which she will long be remembered by 
those interested, and at the close received the approbation 
of the Committee, although there was no formal examination. 
The Fall terra was taught by Miss Allie H. Burnham, a for- 
mer acquaintance with the schools of Acton, and we cannot 
add much to what has already been said in her favor as a 
teacher. She found it a rather difficult school as regards 
discipline, yet she labored hard for the good of her scholars, 
and won the affection and regard of many of them, who ex- 
pressed a wish that she should return again. The Commit- 
tee were able to say at the close, she has done what she 
could. The Winter term was taught by Wm. E. White, 
from Dartmouth College. He was a young man of amiable 
qualities, came well recommended as a teacher, and accom- 
plished a good work. He treated the school kindly, and en- 
deavored to govern by kindness and was partially success- 
ful, but a few of the scholars took advantage of his kindness 
and we feared an outbreak at one time, but one boy, who 
seemed to your Committee to be the leader in every wrong 
act, left when the school was about half through, with the 
expression that he would not come to school if he must 
obey orders, and from that time onward there was no more 
trouble. At the examination many of the classes recited on 
topics selected by the teacher, and drawn by the scholars at 
the time of examination, so that the school was thrown upon 
its own resources. We could not refrain from saying that 
they acquitted themselves manfully and well, and our ap- 
proval was given them and their teacher. 

Centre Grammar. — This school has had three teachers for 
the past year. The Spring term was taught by Miss Junia 
S. Bartlctt, an old and experienced teacher, whose labors 
were well planned and well executed. 



10 

The school for this term, for some reason or other, was 
smaller than the previous term, or since ; yet the teacher and 
scholars generally seemed united in the great purpose of 
making the most of their time and advantages towards secur- 
ing an education, and on the whole the school was a success. 
The Fall term was taught by Miss Lizzie M. Priest, who 
has taught in this school for several terms previous to this, 
and now, as in former terms, the school did a good work, 
and one that will long be remembered by many of the schol- 
ars as among their pleasant and profitable school terms. The 
teacher won for herself the approval of the Committee for her 
prompt and untiring efforts for the good of the school. 

The Winter term was taught by Mr. E. B. Vining, a young 
man of good moral character, who entered upon his labors 
with a determination of having a good school, and govern by 
kindness. But some of the scholars did not choose to be 
thus governed, acknowledging only brute force and the 
motive of fear. Consequently the school was only a partial 
success. The facts were that he did not have the sympathy 
and co-operation of some of the parents, and was tried and 
condemned before school commenced, before they knew 
anything of him as a teacher ; and no teacher can succeed 
under such circumstances. It is a very difficult task when 
supported and aided by the parents. His previous success 
as a teacher has been uniformly good. 

Centre Primary, — The Spring term of this school was 
taught by Miss Flora A. Hay ward, who was possessed of a 
good education, having graduated and received a diploma at 
a neighboring high school. This was her first experience, 
and the Committee wished her success ; yet she failed to gain 
the respect of her pupils to a very great degree. Conse- 
quently her success was not so good as we wished it might 
have been. 

The Fall term was taught by Miss Lizzie M. Blood. Un- 
der her training the school seemed to do well. She had the 
faculty of gaining the esteem and respect of her pupils and 



11 



interesting them in their studies, breaking the monotony of 
sehool exercises by an occasional song, and so a good work 
was accomplished, and the teacher and the term will long be 
remembered by them as among their pleasant and profitable 
terms. 

The Winter term was taught by Miss Allie H. Burnham, 
whose talent for and interest in teaching has won for her the 
love and respect of her pupils in different parts of the town ; 
and here, as in other schools, she did not fail to interest her 
scholars in a very large degree, thus making some of the 
studies, which are frequently called dry and uninteresting, 
the very reverse. Whenever this school was visited b}^ the 
Committee it appeared orderly and studious ; and the closing 
examination gave evidence to the Committee and others pres- 
ent that teacher and scholars had labored hard, unitedly and 
earnestly for the great object of obtaining an education, and 
so prepare them for future usefulness in life ; and we accord 
to teacher and pupils our hearty approval, and wish them 
godspeed in the good work. 

The column in the statistical table appended, showing the 
number of visits of parents and others, does not include the 
Superintendent's visits each term. 

JOHN E. CUTTER, Chairman. 
LUKE BLANCHARD, 
W. H. FAULKNER, 
JOHN WHITE, 
WINSOR PRATT. 

Acton, March 23, 1872. , 



FINANCIAL 



EAST SCHOOL. 

Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 


$258 36 
14 84 


Paid teachers, 
Fuel, 

Care of school room, fires, &c, 
Balance to new account, 


$224 20 

33 25 

8 53 

7 22 



$273 20 



$273 20 
John E. Cutter, Committee, 



SOUTH-EAST SCHOOL. 

(229 63 

28 23 

$257 86 



Drawn from Treasury, $229 63 

Balance from last year, 28 23 



Paid teachers, $235 00 

Fuel, 18 00 

Care of house, fires, &c, 4 86 



$257 8(y 



Winsor Pratt, Committee. 



NORTH SCHOOL. 

Appropriation, $244 12 

Balance from last year, 1 96 

Paid teachers, $220 50 

Fuel, 16 00 

Care of house, fires, &c, 5 98 

Balance to new account, 3 60 



$246 08 



$246 08 



John White, Committee. 



13 
WEST SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last } r ear, ' 

Paid teachers, 

" fuel, 

" care of house, fires, &., 
Balance to new account, 



S605 


60 


43 


16 


$563 


75 


49 


50 


8 


00 


27 


51 



76 



$648 76 
Luke Blanch ard, Committee. 



SOUTH SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 

Paid teachers, 

" fuel, 

" care of house, fires, &c, 
Balance to new account, 



$651 


02 


46 


28 


$640 


00 


38 


00 


15 


25 


4 


05 



$697 30 



1697 30 
W. H. Faulkner, Committee. 



CENTRE SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 

Paid teachers, 

" fuel, 

" care of house, fires, &c, 
Balance to new account, 



$605 60 


4 


19 


502 


25 


61 


73 


12 


00 


33 


81 



$609 79 



$609 79 
John E. Cutter, Committee. 



Amount of money raised by Town, $2,325 00 

Income from State School Fund, 160 83 

" Dog Fund, 125 03 



Total for School purposes, $2,610 86 

Number of children reported by Assessors, between the ages of 
five and fifteen, 310. 

Sum appropriated by Town for each scholar, reported by Assess- 
ors, $7.50. 



14 



ROLL OF HONOR. 



Those who have not been ab- 
sent or tardy for one term. 



Those who have not been ab- Those Avho have not been ab- 
sent or tardy for two terms. sent or tardy for three terms. 



Centre Primary. 



Hattie Smith, 


Mary Hammond. 




Flora Stearns, 






Ella Tuttle, 






Viola S. Tuttle, 






Willie H.Kinsley, 






Frank Pike. 






Josiah Willard, 






Albert H. Smith, 






Freddie Hodgman, 






Herbert Bobbins, 






George W. Tuttle, 






Arthur Tavlor, 






Walter Richardson. 









South Grammar. 




Mary F. Worster, 


Mary Phelan. 


Emma J. Handley. 


Emma L. Billings, 






Jennie A. Tuttle, 






Lizzie Richardson, 






Sidney L. Richardson, 






Michael Hannon, 






Willie S. Warren, 






Norman Davidson, 






Anson Piper, 






George E Haynes, 






John Penny. 










South Primary. 



Hattie Wetherbee, 


Frank Tavlor, 


Usher J. Brown. 


Nettie Fuller, 


Eddie G. Poole, 




Ella Clark, 


Freddie A. Brown, 




Etta C. Temple, 


Etta P. Sawyer. 




Josephine Hannon, 






Martha E. Jones, 






Carrie E. Jones, 






Mary J. Jackson, 






George Priest, 






George H. Jackson, 






Frank L. Jackson, 






James Hannon. 









West Grammar. 






Nellie M. Taylor, 


Lizzie Robinson, 


Emma Stearns. 




Lizzie L Walker, 


Inez Wytnan, 






Nellie Handley, 


George Gardner, 






Lilla Hay ward. 


Austin Lawrence. 






Emma Mead, 








EllaTeele, 








Hattie Whitcomb, 








Warren A. Stevens, 








John Hoar, 






« 


George Hutchins, 








Eddie Havward, 








Edgar H. Hall, 








Alphonso Wvman, 








El tie Wright, 








Julius Streeter. 









15 



Roll of Honor, continued. 



Those who have not been ab- 
sent or tardy for one term. 



Those who have not been ab- 
sent or tardy for two terms. 



Those who have not been ab- 
sent or tardy for three terms. 



West Primary. 



Annie Blanchard, 


Mary Tuttle, 


Lottie Handley, 


Ellie Hapgood, 


Arthur Blanchard, 


Georgie V. Mead. 


Crosby Hoar, 


Bertie Mead. 


Fred Mead. 


Eddie Hoar, 






Georgie Robinson, 






Allie Gilmore, 






Alphonso Wyman, 
Ralph E. Streeter, 










Fred E. Cutler, 






Georgie M. Streeter, 






Arthur W. Houghton. 







East School. 



Lizzie S. Billings, 


Bessie M. Ball, 


Cora Fisk, 
Abbie Fisk. 


Annie E. Elliott, 


Florence Perkins. 


Hattie A. Harris, 






Amelia F. Perkins, 






Lizzie Perkins, 






Webster C. Robbins, 






George H. Robbins, 






Nixon Ball, 






E. R. Conant, 






C J. Robbins, 






George Conant, 
Charles H. Fiske. 











South-East. 



Mary Fairbanks, 
Lucy Oliver, 
Addie Jones, 
Emma Pratt. 




North. 



Julia Ina Rose, 
Sidney White. 



Cora Rouillard, 
Freddie Rouillard, 
Elmer Rouillard. 



Lizzie A. Cash. 



16 



TABLE. 







a 






oi 


a) B 










£ 


o 


« 


> « 


££ 


SCHOOLS. 


TEACHERS. 


o 
o 

Vh B 

o o 


a 

O 

a 

u 

<u 


u 


a 

03 

a 
3 

£ 


r under fi 
s of age. 
over fifte 
s of age. 


CO V 

So 






5 s 


CO 

<u 

bo 




bx> 

03 


1818 


*■< CO 

£> B 






bo 

a 


03 


.a 


< 


gKgK 


a 2f 

S) 03 




Spring. 














n™*r. a S Grammar, 
Centre. J Primary? 


Miss Junia S. Bartlett, 


21 


$31 00 


25 


22 


1 


12 


' Flora A. Hayward, 


21 


26 00 


42 


31.3 


3 


18 


WpRt i Grammar, 
we8t - | Primary, 


" Anna E. Hall, 


24 


35 00 


37 


34 


1 


21 


" S. Jennie Wheeler, 


2* 


30 00 


38 


33.9 


1 


11 


«5nnth S Grammar, 
South, j Primary) 


" Amelia D. Comstock, 


2l 


35 00 


34 


27.5 




7 


" M. A. Edwards, 


2| 


32 00 


49 


40 


1 


7 


East, 


" Mary A. Tinker, 


21 


39 80 


30 


28.7 


5 


13 


South-East, 


" Allie H. Burnham, 


1! 


30 00 


25 


21.4 


1 


15 


North, 


" Ella F. Reed, 
Totals, 


25 00 


16 


13.9 




16 




21| 


$283 80 


296 


252.7 


6 


7 


120 




Fall. 
















n*.^^ 1 Grammar, 
Centre. { PrimarVi 


Miss Lizzie M. Priest, 


2 


36 00! 32 


25.06 






3 


" Lizzie M. Blood, 


2 


32 OOJ 31 


27.8 


1 




17 


w t j Grammar, 
west - j Primary, 


" Allie H. Burnham, 


21 

i 


35 00 36 


30.8 




1 


15 


" S. Jennie Wheeler, 


30 00 


37 


31.6 






16 


<imith i Grammar, 
South, j Primary> 


" Amelia D. Comstock, 


35 00 


36 


29.75 




8 


5 


" Lottie C. Faulkner, 


35 00 


46 


39.16 


1 




12 


East, 


" Mary A. Tinker, 


39 80 


28 


25 2 




5 


10 


South-East, 


" Lizzie W. Beane, 


2} 


28 00 


23 


21.4 






4 


North, 


" Ella F. Reed, 

Totals, 


25 00 


31 


19.5 






7 




20^ 


$295 80 


T90 


250.27 


2 


14 


89 




Winter. 
















TpntrP (Grammar, 
Centre. j Primary) 


Mr. E. B. Vining,* 


24 


55 00 


33 


29 




11 


17 


Miss Allie H. Burnham, 


3 


32 00 


42 


36.38 






81 


WPRt f Grammar, 
wew ' {Primary, 


Mr. Wm. R. White, 


3 


55 00 


37 


31 




21 


29 


Miss S. Jennie Wheeler, 
" Amelia D. Comstock, 


3 


30 00 


49 


41.18 






44 


<*nnth 1 Grammar, 
South. | Primaryj 


34 


40 00 


37 


29 7 




15 


3 


" Lottie C. Faulkner, 


31 


40 00 


39 


32.1 






10 


East, 


" R. S. Cutler, 


l l 

2| 


36 00 


33 


28.6 






8 


South-East, 


" Alice C. Preston, 


30 00 


20 


16.32 


1 


2 


6 


North, 


" Junia S. Bartlett, 

Totals, 
Aggregate for the year, 


3 


35 00 


26 


20 




3 


19 




26 


$353 00 


316 


264.28 


1 


52 


ll7 




68j 


$932 60 


902 


767 25 


9 


73 


426 



Total average percentage of Attendance during the year, 



85. 



REPORTS 



SELECTMEN AND OTHER OFFICERS 



TOWN OF ACTON 



FEBRUARY 26, 1872, TO FEBRUARY 26, 1873, 



INCLUDING THE 



MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS IN 1872. 



THE REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



LOWELL, MASS.: 

HARDEN & ROWELL, PRINTERS, WEEKLY JOURNAL OFFICE. 

1873. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



APPROPRIATIONS AND RECEIPTS. 

Unexpended Balance of last year 

Regular Town Grant 

Town Grant for Schools 

Town Grant for Highways, 

Overlay on Taxes 

Armory rent for 1871 

Armory rent for 1872 ...... . 

Grass in East Cemetery. . -*. 

State Aid to January 1 , 1872 

Corporation Tax 

State School Fund 

From Town of Stow, School money 

Military Account 

Old School house, Centre district 

From Town of Billerica, for support of Nan- 
cy Sprague 

From Town of Billerica, for support of War- 
ren Russell 

Lots sold in Cem jtery 

Use of Town Hall 

Dog Fund 

State Paupers 

Interest on Taxes, 1871 

Note, George C. Wright 3,000 00 

John Goldsmith 2,500 00 

Joseph Barker 1 ,000 00 

D. J. Wetherbee 1,200 00 

H. J. Hapgood .' 400 00 

Lewis Rouillard 200 00 

Joseph Noves 200 00 

Joseph P. Reed 200 00 

Jonathan Piper 600 00 

Luther Billings 200 00 

William D. Tuttle 2,200 00 

Josiah Dow 600 00 

Patrick Farrell 1,150 00 



$1,186 


80 


!),000 


00 


2,375 


00 


1 ,500 


00 


547 


71 


145 


41) 


100 


00 


11 


00 


300 


00 


650 


53 


159 


48 


16 


26 


2 ( J 


00 


302 


25 


24 


G2 


12 


00 


• 16 


00 


147 


00 


133 


03 


117 


14 


45 


20 



Note, John Grimes $300 00 

George Reed 4f>0 00 

George H. Harris 200 00 

John Wilson 500 00 

David M. Handley 1,300 00 

George W. Gates" 200 00 

J. K. W. Wetherbec 300 00 

State Tax 1 ,580 00 

County Tax DIG 19 



$30,011 70 



EXPENDITURES. 

SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 

Paid G. W. Gates, South district $048 00 

Luke Blanchard, West district 01 00 

John E. Cutter, Centre district 008 00 

Henry Brooks, East district 305 52 

Wiusdor Pratt, South-east district 244 40 

George H. Harris, North-east district.. 244 40 



$2,000 32 



SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS AND INCIDENTALS. 

Paid Luke Blanchard, West district 

G. W. Gates, South " .... 
Winsdor Pratt, So. east k ' ..... 
John E. Cutter, Centre " 



$24 


87 


10 


91 


11 


90 


11 


73 



$59 41 



REPAIRS ON HIGHWAYS. 

Paid Luther Davis $ 9 00 

Alonzo Tattle 47 73 

Charles Wheeler 422 31 

A. II. Jones 119 03 

William Spaulding 1 7 05 

Daniel Harris s 51 GO 

John Harris 470 00 

Luther W. Piper 53 96 

Francis Pratt 24 13 

John Grimes 48 40 

Daniel Fletcher 91 50 

Warren Flagg 29 35 

Nathan Brooks 49 00 

John Conant 20 80 

Abel Fairer. Jr 14 07 



o 

Paid Simon Tuttle $27 30 

F. IJ. Whitcomb 25 00 

Moses Taylor 7 00 



$1,062 53 



SPECIAL REPAIRS OK ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

Paid Daniel Harris, tor lumber and labor rail- 
ing road and repairing bridge near 

mills of II. M. Smith". $25 77 

Francis Pratt, lor repairing road from 
Son tli Acton to house of Daniel 

Fletcher , 1,000 00 

Charles Wheeler, for repairing road from 

South Acton to West Cemetery.. . . 438 75 
Charles Wheeler, for repairs on road 

near house of Levi Houghton 150 0G 

Reuben Hundley, for labor on road from 
West Acton to West Cemetery, by 
order of County Commissioners.. . 252 4(J 

Isaac Reed, for breaking roads 7 00 

F. II. Whitcomb., " 3 00 

Levi W. Stevens, ; ' 4 00 

Phineas Wetherbee, lumber for railing.. 2 00 

Simon Tuttle, " 3 00 

- Cyrus Fletcher, " 8 35 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 

Paid Sarah Hunt 16 00 

Sarah 15. Childs 1 7 00 

Mrs. Desmond 

Charles Edmonds 

Sally White 

Adams family, 9 persons, Wilson fami- 
ly, 2 persons, Israel Nickersomwho 
died while infected with small pox, 

Abel W. Jones 

Warren Russell 

Dr. I. Hutchins, medical attendance for 
Nancy Sprague and John Brown in 1867, 

Mrs. Murphy 

Joseph Noyes, journey to Boston re- 

specting Charles Edmonds 

Town Farm deficiency for 1871-2 



15 


00 


27 


13 


47 


00 


248 


69 


92 


00 


12 


00 


30 


62 


1 


00 


4 


00 


203 


19 



$1,894 39 



Paid James E. Billings, journey to Boston in 

reference to State Aid $2 50 

Journey to Maiden, after W. Oliver 3 00 

Journey to Sudbury, after Sarah Hunt. . 2 00 



INTEREST ON TOWN DEBT. 

Taid Augustine Conant $2 ( J2 00 

Cyrus Conant 140 00 

David M. Handle? • • • HI 4s 

Frederick Rouillard 1 1 50 . 

J. E Billings , , . 21G 51 

J. K. Putney ■• . 39 00 

William Wheeler . . . . 30 00 

Daniel Harris 56 37 

Calvin Harris 14 00 

John R. Whitcomb 35 00 

Elizabeth Hanseom 40 80 

J. K. W. Wetherbee... 13 47 

George C. Wright 54 25 

Isaac T. Flagg , 6 00 



TOWN DEBT. 

Paid George C. Wright $3,000 00 

J. K. W. Wetherbee 300 00 



MILITARY ACCOUNT. 

Paid John Fletcher, Jr., armory rent $150 00 

For entertainment of the Old Sixth 

Regt., April 10, 1872 34025 

May Parade 21) 00 



PRINTING. 

Paid Tolman & White for town warrants. . . $14 50 

Blank order book 8 50 

Notices, (wanted) 3 50 

Reports for March and April 10147 

Notices, school land 1 50 

Assessors' notice 1 00 



$721 13 



$3,300 00 



$51 U 25 



Jr j\r 



Paid Dog notice S3 00 

Auction of school house. 1 00 

Sealer of weights and measures 3 00 

Valuation books. 100 60 

Notices, $500 reward 3 50 

Advertising in Herald, S500 reward. 

and telegram, etc !i M^ 



STATE AID. 

Paid Hatttie W. Wilder. . . . . . 89G 00 

Joanna Moulton 48 00 

Rebecca Ci Wright 48 00 

A. E. Sumner. 42 00 

George W. Sawyer . . 42 00 

- Nancy B. Richards 8 00 



cemetery expenses. 

Paid Martin Pike, for labor in East Cemetery $34 00 
Francis Kingsley, digging well in West 

Cemetery 56 00 

Charles Hastings, work, lumber and 

nails, for West Cemeteiy 22 37 



TOWN OFFICERS. 

Paid John E. Cutter, superintending schools. $90 00 
" " collecting taxes 1871. . 80 00 

Abatement of taxes 70 75 

C. A. Harrington, taking valuation and 

making taxes 124 00 

Isaac Reed, taking valuation and mak- 
ing taxes 129 00 

Frederick Rouillard, taking valuation 

and making taxes 134 00 

Simon Tuttle, taking valuation and 

making taxes 132 00 

Wm. D. Tuttle, taking valuation, mak- 
ing and copying taxes 1 19 00 

Do., preparing Assessors' notices for 

printing. 2 00 



8251 45 



$284 00 



$112 37 



8 



Paid Do., copying valuation hook for print- 
ing. 

Do., services as Town Clerk 

James E. Billings, services as Select- 
man 

Hiram J. Hapgood, services as Select- 
man 



$10 


50 






25 


00 






55 


00 






40 


00 










$1,011 


25 



SCHOOL HOUSES. 

Paid Henry M. Smith, Centre scoool house.. $234 20 
J. E. Cutter, settees and ladder for 

Centre school house 17 50 

Geo. C. Wright, West school house... 7,000 00 

James Tuttle, South school house 7,000 00 



$14,251 70 



$11 


03 


6 


00 




37 




75 


1 


05 




84 




25 



TOWN HOUSE EXPENSES. 

Paid Geo. W. Sawyer, 30 galls, oil 

washing floor,30 hours 
ink, paper and pens. . 
six lamp chimneys. . . 

1 sprinkler 

2 brooms 

24 lamp wicks 

opening town hall 51 

times :)?) '2; 

opening hall to jubilee 

singers 

repairing funnel. . . . 
taking care of clock. 

cleaning clock 

varnishing hall 

J. E. Cutter, for coal 



13 


00 


3 


00 


10 


00 




75 


5 


70 


25 


07 



$113 15 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid Daniel Jones, repairing tree on common, $9 02 
John Fletcher, Jr., for pump for well on 

common 1 00 

Cost of indictment for road nuisance, 

18G7 21 40 

Crampton Brothers, damage to cow. ... 18 00 

Standard vard measure 15 00 



$51 


50 


47 


GO 


16 


00 


2 


25 


4 


50 


4 


65 


3 


23 



9 


75 


1 


50 


11 


70 


1 


50 


5 


40 



9 



PaidJohn Dean, land for gravel 

Joseph Noyes, road scraper 

F. B. H olden, damage b} 7 defect inroad, 
Jonas Blodgett, selling school house . . . 
Wm. D. Tuttle, expenses on pub. doc. . 

" valuation book 

" stationary and postage. 

" expenses to Boston to 

get valuation printed, 1 30 

Surveying and grading road from South 

Acton to powder mills . 

Setting and marking stake on roads. . 

Recording 39 births 

u 10 marriages 

" 34 deaths 

Description of school house lot in West 

Acton 2 00 

Journey to Sudbury to make out certifi- 
cate of election 

G. W. Sawyer, tolling bell, 15 deaths. 
Francis D wight, attending funerals for 

33 persons 

Coffin for Israel Nickerson 

Making returns of 32 deaths 

J, E. Cutter, stamps on notes 

" ' books for Centre district. 

" express on books, &c . . . 

" insurance on West school 

house 

" error in county tax. . . , 

Geo. W. Gates and J. K.W. Wetherbee, 
land for school house in So. Acton, 

Geo. Hey wood, for advice 

J. E. Billings, express 

" postage 

" stationary 



2 


20 


3 


00 


99 


00 


4 


50 


3 


20 


3 


25 


3 


80 


2 
i 


60 


110 


00 


2 


97 


500 


00 


1 


50 


1 


00 




60 




50 



$975 02 



RECEIPTS FROM FEB. 26, 1872, TO FEB. 26, 1873. 

Unexpended balance as per report of Feb. 

26, 1872 $1,186 80 

Appropriations and receipts 34,827 90 

$36,014 70 



10 

EXPENDITURES. 

Support of schools <• $2,G66 32 

Repairs of school houses and incidentals. . . 59 41 

Repairs of highways 1 ,062 53 

Special repairs on highways and bridges. . . . 1,894 39 

Support of poor 721 13 

Interest 1,189 38 

Town debt 3,300 00 

Military 519 25 

Printing , 254 45 

State aid 284 00 

Cemetery 112 37 

Town officers 1,011 25 

School houses 14,251 70 

Town house 113 15 

Miscellaneous 975 02 

State tax „ 1,580 00 

County tax 91G 19 



TOWN DEBT. 

Ebenezer Conant 82,007 G<j 

Augustine Conant 4,135 33 

Y_ Daniel Harris 84G 78 

Frederick Rouillard , 1,791 11 

Joel Hanscom 700 40 

V J. E.Billings 2,138 07 

David M. Hundley 3,054 25 

y. Isaac T. Flngg 1 OG 35 

■JL Calvin Harris 203 03 

John R. Whitcomb 507 58 

J. K. Putney 693 GO 

^.William Wheeler 523 00 

James A. Billings 217 00 

John Goldsmith 2,642 18 

Joseph Barker 1,025 46 

^ D. J. Wetherbee 1,241 00 

*H. J. Hapgood 410 96 

Louis Rouillard 205 63 

> Joseph Noyes 206 02 

> Joseph P. Reed 20G 02 

)C Jonathan Piper 616 05 

' Luther Billings 203 34 



1,910 54 



Balance in treasury Feb. 26, 1873 $5,104 16 



11 

W. D. Tuttle $1,017 50 

L Josiah Dow 606 53 

Patrick Parrel 1,158 05 

f John Grimes 303 50 

Geo. Reed 457 87 

; Geo. H. Harris 200 70 

John Wilson , 500 00 

G. W. Gates, 212 75 

s W. D. Tuttle 1,200 00 

$29,397 72 

Amount due from State aid, 332 00 

From State, care of sick State paupers 193 69 

Estimated value of old school houses 1,000 00 

Due from Town Treasurer 5,104 16 

6,629 85 

Balance against the Town $22,767 87 



JAMES E. BILLINGS, ) Selectmen 
JOSEPH NOYES, \ of 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD, j Acton. 
Acton, Feb. 26, 1873. 






REPORT OF THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

AT THE 

ALMSHOUSE IN ACTON, 

For the Year Ending April 1st, 1873. 

ARTICLES ON HAND, APRIL 1st, 1873. 

1 horse $250 00 

9 cows 362 50 

5£ tons hay 137 50 

Oat straw 9 

45 hens 33 

3 turkeys 3 

2 shotes 18 

10 pounds lard 1 

Pickles 2 

40 lbs. corn beef 4 

4 bbl. apples 8 

75 lbs. salt pork 7 

100 lbs. ham 

50 bush, potatoes 

1 ho" 



RECEIPTS. 

Milk $798 

Apples 168 

Berries 23 

Poultry 49 

Calves GO 

Eggs 26 

Potatoes 2 

Ashes 4 

Bags 2 

Squash 2 

3 cows 107 



$1,245 02 



13 

EXPENDITURES. 

For oil meal $40 95 

Cloth and clothing 22 25 

Sugar , 42 58 

Glass and putty 1 10 

Grass seed 9 61 

Coffee 3 32 

Castings 31 

Corn meal 289 12 

Tobacco 5 60 

Matches 65 

Medicine 2 02 

Mustard 59 

Saleratus. 44 

Cream Tartar 1 49 

Paint 3 17 

Ointment 1 25 

Blueing. 12 

Nails 78 

Soda 1 12 

Lemons 92 

Brushes 1 53 

Barrels 20 05 

Starch 1 11 

Scraps 1 94 

Rope ■, 1 64 

Brooms 76 

Axe helve 33 

Tomatoes 40 

Spices 3 81 

Beef c. 76 75 

Lounge 13 00 

Tools 4 11 

Salt , 5 26 

Bread 1 24 

Butter 30 63 

Candles 2 25 

Rye meal 1 75 

Potatoes 1 08 

Turnips 75 

Cabbage 25 

Tin ware 6 54 

Lettuce 17 

Flour 67 00 

Rice 2 31 

Oil 2 24 

Onions 6 24 



H 

For Vinegar $3 94 

Dried apples 1 40 

Tea 12 37 

Beans 5 76 

Raisins 4 62 

Soap 8 08 

Door latches 31 

Stone Jar 1 17 

Fish 8 03 

Molasses 13 99 

Cheese 15 24 

Peas 98 

Repairing barn 4 50 

Filing saw 50 

Wheelwright bill 5 00 

Butchering hogs. 2 50 

Poultry .* 2 50 

Oats 8 75 

Newspaper 3 75 

• Labor 82 83 

Shotes 13 00 

Use of Bull 3 00 

Repairing harness 2 07 

Dr. Cowdrey's bill 5 50 

Blacksmith bill 9 78 

Lumber 4 99 

Pump and repairs 8 00 

Balances 35 

Locks 95 

Basket , 37 

Barley 90 

Lime 1 10 

Smoking ham 70 

Honey , 25 

Solder. . 30 

Pasturing cows « 20 00 

Hay 54 46 

Repairing sink 50 

Stove 3 - 00 

Pnng 20 50 

Pail 36 

Blacking GO 

1 jug 35 

Coopering 44 

Services of Charles Morris 325 00 

James E. Billings, for services as Overseer of the 

Poor 14 00 

Joseph Noyes " " " 8 00 



15 

For Hiram J. Hapgood, services as Overseer of the Poor, $8 00 

81,373 82 
Total amount of Receipts 1 ,245 02 

Drawn from Treasury to balance account. 128 80 

Income less than expenditures 128 80 

Interest on the Farm 239 40 

Drawn from Treasury 128 80 

$368 20 

Victualling 66 travellers. $33 00 

Cost of supporting Poor on Farm $335 20 



Whole number of persons, exclusive of travellers, supported in 
the Almshouse, three ; average number, three ; present number, 
three. 

JAMES E. BILLINGS, ) Overseers 
JOSEPH NOYES, } of 

HIRAM J. IIAPGOOD, j Poor. 

Acton, April 1, 1873. 



We hereby certify that we have examined the Reports of the 
Selectmen and Overseers of the Poor, and find them to be correct. 
WM. D. TUTTLE, 

j. k. w. wetherbe: 

D. J. WETHERBEE, 



■•) 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



BIRTHS IN ACTON IN 1872. 

No. Date of Birth. Name of Child. Parents' Names. 

1 Jan. 1, Elizabeth Trainor, daughter of Hugh and Hannah 

Trainor. 

2 Jan. 9, Ida Luella Boucher, daughter of Lewis H. and Lilla A. 

Boucher. 

3 Feb. 13, Thomas Joseph Mannion, son of John and Julia Man- 

niou. 

4 Feb. 17, Ada Marion Jones, daughter of Lowell A. and Sarah 

A. Jones. 

5 Feb. 26, Berta Velma Littlefield, daughter of Nahuin and Addie 

M. Littlefield. 

6 March 2, Nettie Frances Drew, daughter of George H. and 

Nellie Drew. 

7 March 11, Leander Van Ness Tuttle, son of Luke and S. So- 

phia Tuttle. 

8 March 19, Grade Etidora Tuttle, daughter of Alonzo L. and 

Ellen Tuttle. 

9 April 4, James Davis, son of John and Elizabeth Davis. 

10 April 10, lola Augusta Preston, daughter of Oscar E. and Ma- 

ry S. Preston. 

11 April 12, George F. Clark, son of George and Carrie M. Clark. 

12 April 13, Harry Forest Hayward, son of Frank F. and Emily 

N. Hayward. 

13 April 19, Edwin Fletcher Smith, son of Henry M. and Abbie 

B. Smith. 

14 April 22, Roy Gardner Brooks, son of Henry and Julia A. 

Brooks. 

15 April 22, Ellen Augusta Calanan, daughter of Daniel and Ellen 

Calanan. 
1G May 11, Albert Cochrane, son of John and Emma E. Cochrane. 

17 June 1, Mary A. Randall, daughter of Freeman L. and Amelia 

Randall. 

18 June 11, Medora Carlotta Barker, daughter of Henry and 

Louisa M. Barker. 

19 June 15th, Thomas Turner Foley, son of Patrick and Elizabeth 

Foley. 



17 

20 June 22, John Andrew Fehan, son of John and Lizzie M. Fehan. 

21 Jul}' 16, Louis Downing Whittemore, son of Frank H. and 

Nellie M. Whittemore. 

22 Aug. 6, Henry Clay Dibble, son of Philo and Clementine Dibble. 
.23 Sept. 23, Albert J. Reed, son of Reuben L. and Mary A. Reed. 

24 Sept. 27, a daughter to Frank A. and Anna P. Brown. 

25 Oct. 5, Grace Lillian Hosmer, daughter of Lucius S. and Ella 

F. Hosmer. 

26 Oct. 20, William Henry Bradley, son of Dennis and Hannah 

Bradley. 

27 Oct. 24, Willard Alvin Davis son of Alvin A. and Susan M. 

Davis. 

28 Oct. 28, Grace Evelyn Robbins, daughter of Elbridge J. and 

Ellen M. Robbins. 

29 Nov. 23, Belle Gertrude Sumner, daughter of Alson R. and 

Carrie A. Sumner. 

30 Nov. 27, Margaret Traverse, daughter of Stephen and Cathe- 

rine Traverse. 

31 Nov. 30, Mildred Abia Rogers, daughter of Sumner and Mattie 

C. Rogers. 

32 Dec. 3, a son to Herbert T. and Mary J. Clark. 

33 Dec. 17, a son to Isaac W. and Emma Flagg. 

34 Dec. 21, Luther Conant, son of Luther and S. Augusta Conant. 

35 Dec. 22, Francis Borden Farrar, son of Abel, jr., and Delina 

Farrar. 

36 Dec. 23, Oliver Drew Wood, son of Rev. Franklin P. and Abby 

O. Wood. 

37 Dec. 31, a son to Richard and Ann Morris. 
Males, 21 ; females, 16 ; total, 37. 

1869, May 10, Idella Josephine Barker, daughter of Henry and 

Louisa M. Barker. 

1870, Dec. 26, Lizzie Maria Fehan, daughter of John and Lizzie M. 

Fehan. 



MARRIAGES RECORDED IN ACTON IN 1872. 

_Vo. Date of Marriage. Karnes of Parties. 

1 April 10, Mr. James McGreen and Miss Belle Batchelder, both 

of Acton. 

2 April 14, Mr. George H. Decoster, of Acton, and Miss Lucy A. 

Blanchard of Boxborough. 

3 May 23, Mr. Isaac T. Flagg, of Acton, and Mrs. Lucy A. Keyes, 

of Groton. 

4 May 29, Mr. Edgar Alonzo Jenkins, of Shirley, and Miss Lydia 

Ann Richardson, of Townsend. 



18 

5 June 6, Mr. A. Augustine Jenkins, of Leominster, and Miss 

Emma L. Knight, of Ayer. 

6 Nov. 30, Mr. Elliot O. Taylor, of Dunstable, and Miss Charlotte 

A. Dutton, of Acton. 

7 Dec. 4, Mr. Herbert E. Preston and Miss Sophia E. Symonds, 

both of Acton. 

8 Dec. 11, Mr. Theron F. Newton and Miss Anna A. Tuttle, both 

of Acton. 

9 Dec. 23, Mr. Edward D. Battles, of Acton, and Miss Adelia Ben- 

nett, of Concord. 
10 Dec. 25, Mr. Horace Tuttle, 2nd, and Miss Arethusa M. Conant, 
both of Acton. 



, DEATHS IN ACTON IN 1872. 

No. Date of Death. Name and Age. 

1 Jan. 7, widow Eunice Barker, aged 91 years and 23 days. 

2 Jan. 24, Mr. Mathew Markland, aged 75 years 10 months. 

3 Feb. 9, Mrs. Betsey Conant, widow of Simeon Conant, aged 74 

years, 9 months, 9 days. 

4 March 25, Mrs. Mehitable Piper, widow of Silas Piper, aged 101 

years, 2 months, 1 day. 

5 March 31, George E. McDonnell, aged 16 years, 7 mos., 2 days. 

6 April 9, James Davis, son of John and Elizabeth Davis aged 5 ds. 

7 May 19, Mrs. Mary Ann Quinlan, aged 42 years, 3 mos., 17 ds. 

8 June 4, Mrs. Lucy Briggs, wife of Daniel R. Briggs, aged 66 yrs. 

9 June 12, Mr. Lewis F. Ball, aged 53 yrs., 10 days. 

10 June 16, Mrs. Ann Maria Parks, aged 31 jts.. 11 mos. 

11 June 17, Mr. Horace Adams, aged 35 yrs., 5 mos. 

12 June 18, Mr. Abel Jones, aged 88 yrs., 9 mos., 22 days. 

13 June 26, Dea. Silas Hosmer, aged 80 yrs., 3 mos., 1 day. 

14 July 3, Miss Julia Mann, aged 22 yrs., 2 mos. 

15 July 10, Mr. Elias Warner, aged 76 yrs., 9 mos., 3 days. 

16 July 17, Capt. Jonathan Hosmer, aged 86 yrs., 9 mos., 14 days. 

17 July 26, Mr. Horace C. Rodgers, aged 29 yrs., 6 mos., 10 days. 

18 July 27, Nellie, daughter of Marcus M. and Martha M. Ray- 

mond, aged 6 months, 18 days 

19 Aug. 9, Mr. Amos Noyes, aged 62 yrs., 11 mos., 13 days. 

20 Aug. 11, Mary A., daughter of Freeman L. and Amelia Randall, 

aged 2 months, 10 days. 

21 August 24, Mrs. Elizabeth A. Jenkins, aged 40 yrs., 11 mos. 

22 Sept. 4, Mr. Jacob Soper, aged 72 yrs., 9 mos., 28 days. 

23 Sept. 6, Mrs. Martha Hastings, wife of Mr. Charles Hastings, 

aged 48 years. 

24 Sept. 18, Mrs. Bridget Shurry, wife of John Shurry, aged 34 yrs. 



19 

25 Sept. 28, Mr. Israel Nickerson, aged 17 years. 

26 Oct. 18, Mr. John S. Hoar, aged 43 yrs., 3 mos., 24 days. 

27 Oct. 20, Miss Hattie L. Hoar, daughter of John S. and Lydia P. 

Hoar, aged 20 years, 2 months. 

28 Nov. 15, Lilla May Teel, daughter of William H. and Mary E. 

Teel, aged 3 years, 2 months, 1 1 da3*s. 

29 Nov. 23, Miss Olive A. Pickens, daughter of Elisha and Mary C. 

Pickins, aged 15 years, 3 months, 16 days. 

30 Nov. 25, William Murphy, aged 80 years. 

31 Nov. 27, Martha E. Jones, daughter of Aaron M. and Augusta 

C. Jones, aged 10 years, 10 months. 

32 Dec. 6, Mr. Aaron Wood, aged 73 years. 

33 Dec. 14, Mrs. Elizabeth M. Hosmer, wife of Mr. Edwin Hosmer, 

aged 43 years, 2 months, 1 day. 

34 Dec. 22, Mr. William Spaulding, aged 59 years, 4 mos., 18 days. 



DOGS LICENSED IN 1872. 

Males, 67, at $2 each $134 00 

Females, 5, at $5 each 25 00 



Total, 72 $159 00 

WM. D. TUTTLE, Town Clerk. 
Acton, March 26, 1873. 



THE ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



S C H L C M M I T T E E 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



For the School Year 1872-73. 



LOWELL, MASS. : 

MARDEN & ROWELL, PRINTERS, WEEKLY JOURNAL OFFICE 

1873. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



To the Citizens of Acton: 

Your School Committee having discharged the 
duties committed to their charge, respectfully submit 
for your consideration the following report: 

In making this report, it affords us pleasure to be 
able to say, that with a very few exceptions, the 
progress and general success of the schools have been 
quite satisfactory. Considering everything, — the 
number of different teachers employed, the rate of 
compensation which we have been able to offer as an in- 
ducement to experienced teachers to labor in our 
schools and the fact that our schools are so far separated 
that we are not able to have teachers' meetings — consid- 
ering these and other things which might be mentioned 
we think that the success of the schools the past year 
has been as great as could have been expected. We 
can not expect our schools to be equal to those of 
the cities and larger towns, for the above mentioned 
and other reasons. Not only are we unable to offer 
adequate compensation for experienced teachers of the 
highest order of ability, but because of the fact that 
there is no High School in town, we feel it necessary 
to admit to our schools a range of studies that other- 
wise would be excluded. It is, moreover, more difficult 
to inspire the pupils of our schools with an ambition 
to excel in their studies, than it would be had we a 



High School to which they hoped to be promoted 
when sufficiently advanced in their studies. We hope 
the time may come when this Towm will have a High 
School, as well as good Primary and Grammar 
Schools. But in the mean time, we hope you will 
bear in mind the disadvantages under which those in 
charge of your schools have to labor, and approve or 
censure them accordingly. 

As a general thing, however, in spite of the diffi- 
culties above referred to, we have been able to secure 
the best of teachers. Had you placed at our disposal 
twice as much money as you actually did place, we do 
not know that we could have secured any better 
teachers for those schools. It is only in a few cases 
that we were partially unsuccessful. Not only have 
the teachers as a general thing been efficient, but we 
are happy to say that the people of the several 
districts have, with few exceptions, earnestly co-oper- 
ated with the teachers and committee in their endeav- 
ors to make the schools completely successful. In 
looking over the reports we find that a large number 
have visited the schools, and thus shown their interest 
Those who have visited the schools and others having 
children that have been pupils, have aided the com- 
mittee by giving information respecting the schools 
and by making suggestions as to how, in their opinion, 
the}- might be improved. We feel confident, more- 
over, that many parents have promoted the success of 
the schools by teaching their children to respect the 
teachers, obey the rules, and to be faithful in their 
studies. We take this opportunity to commend all 



those who, in these wa} r s, have promoted the cause of 
popular education the past year, and to bespeak, on 
the part of these and others, a similar co-operation in 
the future. 

During the past winter it was our privilege to see 
four of the largest schools in town, located in beauti- 
ful and commodious school rooms. We feel sure that 
these new and ample provisions for the pressing wants 
of our scholars will do more towards attracting and 
retaining efficient teachers than anything else that 
could have been done. We think, too, that these new 
school houses, with their ample and convenient means 
for warmth and ventilation, will not only promote the 
interests of education, but will contribute to the health 
and longevity of many who will be obliged to spend a 
large portion of the most important period of their 
lives in our school rooms. On these accounts we 
would recommend what seems to be the settled policy 
of the town, that every district in the township be 
provided with a school-room suited to its wants. 

But while our oversight of the schools the past 
year affords us so many topics for commendation and 
encouragement, we feel that we should be wanting in 
our duty, were we not to mention certain defects 
which, in our opinion, ought to be remedied as soon 
as possible. 

TREATMENT OF TEACHERS. 



1st. We think it possible for the people of the 
ral districts to aid the commii 
our schools more efficient teachers. 



everal districts to aid the committee in securing for 



In the first place, if a teacher is not successful in 
his work; if the committee are confident that some 
other teacher can be secured who will do the work 
more faithfully, the people ought not to allow any 
personal considerations to stand in the way of the 
dismissal of that teacher and the employment of 
another, at the end of a term at least. It is sometimes 
the case that teachers endeavor by cultivating personal 
favor in the community to make up for their lack of 
success in the school-room. We feel that in order to 
have successful schools, success in teaching must be 
the condition of a continuance in office. 

Again, on the other hand, if a teacher is success- 
ful in his appointed work, no personal considerations 
should lead any one to endeavor to bring about his 
removal. But on the contrary, every parent and 
scholar should do all in his power to so co-operate with 
the teacher, and make his position so agreeable that 
he will prefer to teach in one of our schools to going 
elsewhere, even if his salary is not as large. When 
this course shall have been adopted by the people of 
all the districts in the Town, the duties of the commit- 
tee will be far less heavy and disagreeable than they 
are in some cases at present. 

Again we would recommend, that if a teacher 
does not seem to be perfectly successful in his work, 
(if he is having a fair degree of success,) that the 
people, after having expressed their views of the 
matter to the committee, be not clamorous for an im- 
mediate removal. The committee may not be able to 
supply the place immediately with any one who will 



do better; and it may endanger the reputation of the 
school, or be unjust to the teacher who may have been 
successful in other schools — these and other reasons 
may make it appear to the committee not better to 
make an immediate change; and we feel that the peo- 
ple should sustain them in such a course. 

SCHOOL DISCIPLINE. 

2nd. A defect in our schools, which we will 
mention, is a lack of good order. This fault has been 
so often dwelt upon in the annual reports of this com- 
mittee, that it seems superfluous for us to mention it 
again. Our excuse for doing so is the fact that we 
are confident that one of the principal reasons for the 
lack of good order in our schools is the faulty view of 
the subject taken by many of the parents of the 
pupils. For instance, a parent asked one of our 
teachers not long ago, "Why can't you have the same 
kind of order and discipline in your school that the 
scholars have in their homes?" Every parent who 
has two or three children, and has attempted to read 
or write at home, can answer the question without any 
aid. But the question illustrates the ideas which 
many entertain upon this subject. As we look upon 
it, one of the good results of a well regulated common 
school is — that it tends to train the scholars to be good 
and law-abiding citizens, by forming in them the habit 
of implicit obedience to properly constituted authority. 
Did our common schools accomplish nothing more 
than this, they would do a good work. But aside 
from this, it is of course the fact that without good 



8 

order there can be no satisfactory progress in knowl- 
edge. It is hardly necessary to say that a strict 
observance of order is as necessary in the Primary as 
in the Grammar schools. Unless scholars are taught 
to be orderly in the lower schools, and form the habit 
of being so, it will be difficult to control them when 
they enter the higher departments. 

TEXT BOOKS. 

3d. A. thing which we will mention, in respect 
to which we think there is room for improvement, is 
the matter of text books. 

The school committee are able in the circum- 
stances of the case, to shape the methods of teaching 
in our schools to such a limited degree, — teachers are 
necessarily left to pursue their own methods to such 
an extent, it is very important that we should provide 
the best of text-books, and insist that they, (if nothing 
else) shall be taught. We are satisfied that better 
text-books for the wants of our schools, than those 
which we have in use, are now published. We have 
attempted no changes the past year, for the reasons 
that we have not been satisfied fully, what, among the 
many good text-books which have been brought to 
our notice, would be best, were any change to be 
made; and because of the fact that the parents of 
the scholars have manifested an unwillingness to have 
any changes made on account of the supposed extra 
cost of new books. To obviate this last objection, 
we would suggest that when changes are made, they 
be commenced in the classes that are taking up a study 
for the first time, and will be obliged to purchase new 



9 

books of some kind, and, as publishers sell there books 
for introduction at a greatly reduced price, there need 
be no extra expense, but a saving of money by a 
change of books. 

MUSIC. 

4th. A thing which we will just refer to, was 
mentioned in the last School Report, viz: The desir- 
ability of having more instruction in the art of singing 
imparted in our schools. Singing by rote has been 
taught to some extent in several schools the past year, 
but we think with a slight expense of time and money, 
by the use of charts and the progressive music books 
which are now published, any teacher, who has a 
slight knowledge of music, may impart the science of 
music without detriment, but to the advantage of the 
regular studies of the school. 

MAPS AND CHARTS. 

5th. The last thing which we will simply advert 
to, is the desirability of having our new school rooms 
provided with maps and other necessary school appa- 
ratus. We trust the liberality and good judgment of 
the people will not allow this want to remain unsup- 
plied. 

Passing from this more general view of the 
schools we will notice, as briefly as possible, what has 
been done in the several schools of the Town, during 
the past year, noticing the different schools in the 
order pursued in our last report. 

East School. — This school had the same teacher 
Miss M. I. Spalding, throughout the year. Although 



10 

the business of teaching was almost new to Miss S. 
when she began this school, she immediately mani- 
fested such an aptitude for teaching, possessed on all 
occasions such a degree of self-control, took such an 
evident and lively interest in her work and all the 
pupils under her charge, that her success as a teacher 
was assured at the out-set. The scholars of this 
school co-operated with their teacher most heartily and 
showed a steady progress in their studies throughout 
the year. The public examinations which closed the 
fall and winter terms were most creditable to teacher 
and scholars. 

South- JEast. — This school also, had the same 
teacher, Miss Grace A. Vose, throughout the year. 
She, like the teacher last mentioned, was not much 
experienced in the business of teaching, when she 
began this school, but she manifested such an interest 
in her work, the school was so small and her scholars 
so young, that we thought she would succeed. So far 
as we could ascertain, her success the first two terms 
of the year, though not brilliant, was fair. We heard 
no complaint on the part of any inhabitant of the dis- 
trict, until near the end of the last term. But the 
examination which closed the last term of the year, 
failed to show that familiarity with the studies pursued 
and that extent of acquisition on the part of the 
scholars, which we feel it to be our duty to insist upon 
in our schools. 

North. — This, like the schools previously men- 
tioned, had the same teacher, Miss Ella Reed, through- 
out the year. As Miss R. has taught in this school 



11 

before, and been favorably mentioned in a previous 
report, it is hardly necessary that we should speak of 
her work here. We will simply say that Miss R. 
applied herself quietly but persistently to her work, 
and her pupils co-operated with her so cordially that 
every term of the year was a success. We considered 
the examination which closed the last term one of the 
most successful that has been had in town during the 
year. 

South Primary. — This school had no change in 
teacher, but was taught through the year by Miss 
Lottie C. Faulkner. This teacher has been highly 
commended in several reports of this committee, so 
that it is only necessary to reiterate what has been 
said. In our intercourse with teachers we have met 
with very few so well adapted, both by nature and 
habit, to the instruction of young scholars. We 
think this school most fortunate in having such a 
teacher, and we hope that she may continue long in 
her work. 

South Grammar. — This school enjoyed through 
the year the continued labors of Miss Amelia Corn- 
stock, to whose ability as a teacher, previous reports 
have paid well merited tribute. Miss C. is most 
thorough in her method of teaching, decided and 
dignified in the government of the school, and at the 
close of every term is able to show solid results, as 
proofs of her fidelity and the faithful co-operation of 
her pupils. 

West Primary. — The first term of this school 
was taught by Miss Jennie Wheeler. Miss W. had 



12 

taught in this school several terms, and had the love 
of her pupils and the good will of their parents to a 
marked degree. Miss W. always seemed at home in 
the school-room, and was faithful to her charge. We 
thought the classes in reading made especially good 
progress under her instruction. 

The fall and winter terms of this school were 
taught by Miss Annie E. Hall. The fall term was 
somewhat broken by the teacher's illness, but the 
examination at the end of the winter term was emi- 
nently successful. We consider Miss H. one of our 
best teachers, and are much pleased to know that she 
is to continue in this school. 

West Grammar. — The first two terms of this 
school were taught by Miss Grace Barnes. Miss B. 
w r as lacking in experience when she undertook the 
school, and though in our opinion she devoted herself 
most earnestly to her work, she did not prove herself, 
in this school, a highly successful teacher. So far as 
the committee could ascertain, the first term of her 
school was successful to a fair degree, but during the 
second term there was such general disorder in the 
school that her efforts to teach were completely neu- 
tralized. 

The winter term was taught by Miss J. S. Bart- 
lett, a teacher of ripe experience and of such decision 
of character that she proved herself just the teacher 
for the place. In our judgment, no teacher could have 
done better than she did. The people of this district 
encouraged and sustained the teacher and committee 
in enforcing good order, and the result was one of 



13 

the most orderly and well disciplined schools in town. 
We hope that a similar course may be pursued in the 
future. 

Center Primary. — The first two terms of the 
year were taught by Miss Ina V. Austin. Miss A. 
seemed very well adapted to the work of instructing 
young children, was beloved by her pupils and very 
highly esteemed by the parents best acquainted with 
her. We expected her scholars would show much 
progress at the end of the second term of the school, 
but for some reason they failed to do so. We think 
that Miss A. did not sufficiently insist upon the 
scholars becoming perfectly familiar with the branches 
of knowledge taught in their text books. She had 
taught in a school where the work is arranged by the 
superintendent, with little regard to text-books, (a 
thing which might be done in this town if the super- 
intendent could devote all his time to the management 
of the schools.) The committee w^ere so sure that 
Miss A. would have had better success another term, 
that they would have retained her, had not a well 
qualified teacher in town applied for the school. The 
winter term was taught by Miss Ada C. Davis. This 
was Miss D.'s first experience in teaching; but she 
had received special instructions for the work, and 
entered upon her duties with a zest and self-control 
that gave good assurance of success, at the outset. 
The examination which closed the term was eminently 
successful. So far as we are aware, her labors gave 
perfect satisfaction to parents and pupils. 



u 

Center Grammar. — The first two terms of this 
school were taught by Miss Allie H. Burnham. Miss 
B. has been so frequently and highly commended in 
previous reports that we need add nothing in praise 
of her good qualities as a teacher. It will suffice to 
say that she put her best work into these terms of the 
school, and at the examination which closed the 
second term showed results corresponding with her 
earnest and well directed efforts. 

The winter term was begun by Mr. John H. 
Butler, of Dartmouth College, who proving himself 
unequal to the work, after an effort of three weeks? 
resigned, and was succeeded immediately by Mr. E. 
F. Richardson, who taught here, w T hat he teaches 
everywhere, a good, orderly school. At the examin- 
ation which closed the term, the scholars gave evi- 
dence of having made good progress in their studies. 

We append the usual statistical tables. In the 
number of visits made to the schools, those of the 
superintendent are not included. 

Respectfully submitted, 

jomsr E. CUTTER, i 
GEORGE W. GATES, | 
LUKE BLANCHARD, } Committee. 
GEORGE H. HARRIS, | 
WINSOR PRATT, J 

F. P. WOOD, Superintendent. 



FINANCIAL. 



EAST SCHOOL. 

Drawn from the Treasury $305 52 

Balance from last year 7 22 

$312 74 

Paid teachers $250 00 

Fuel 37 45 

Care of house, &c 20 47 

Balance to new account 4 82 

$312 74 

Henry Brooks, Committee. 

SOUTH-EAST SCHOOL. 

Drawn from the Treasury $240 00 

$240 00 

Paid teachers $210 00 

Fuel 18 00 

Care of house, &c 10 05 

Balance to new account 1 95 

$240 00 

Winsor Pratt, Committee. 

NORTH SCHOOL. 

Appropriation. . » $244 40 

Balance from last year 3 60 

$248 00 

Paid teachers $214 50 

Fuel 16 00 

Care of house, &c 6 28 

Balance to new account 11 22 

$248 00 

George Harris, Committee. 



16 

WEST SCHOOL. 

Appropriation $616 00 

Balance from last year 27 51 

$643 51 

Paid teachers $538 75 

Fuel 62 28 

Care of house, &c 12 90 

Balance to new account 29 58 

$643 51 

Luke Blanch ard, Committee. 



SOUTH SCHOOL. 

Appropriation $648 00 

Balance from last year 4 02 

$652 02 

Paid teachers $545 00 

Fuel 71 55 

Care of house, fires, &c 19 70 

Balance to new account 15 77 

$652 02 



Geo. W. Gates, Committee. 



CENTER SCHOOL. 

Appropriation $608 00 

Balance from last year 33 81 

$641 81 

Paid teachers $547 53 

Fuel 79 28 

Taking care of house, &c 15 00 

$641 81 

J. E. Cutter, Committee. 



17 



ROLL OP HONOE. 



Those who have not been ab- 
sent or tardy for one term. 



Those who have not been ab- 
sent or tardy for two terms. 



Those who have not been ab- 
sent or tardy for three terms. 



EAST SCHOOL. 



Etta Esterbrook, 
Cora Eiske, 
Hattie Harris, 
Susie Wetherbee, 



Hattie Esterbrook, 
Abbie Fiske, 



NORTH SCHOOL 



Jennie Berry, 
Lizzie Cash, 
Ina Rose, 
Lizzie Ryan, 
Xellie Ryan, 
Freddie Rouillard, 



Cora Rouillard, 
Carrie White, 
Elmer Rouillard, 



SOUTH-EAST SCHOOL. 



Estelle Heath, 
Mabel Pratt, 
Lester X. Fletcher, 
Lawrin Pratt. 



Emma A. Pratt, 



SOUTH PRIMARY. 



Addie Barker, 


Lizzie B. Faulkner, 


Usher Brown,* 


Gertie Clark. 


Josie Hannon, 


Hiram H. Gates, 


Emma Counter, 


Emilv Hannon, 




Mary E. Haggertv, 


Carrie B. Hay ward. 




Mary Hosmer, 


Marv I. Jackson, 




Marv A. Knights, 


Martha Jones, 




Eva F. Shapley, 


Susie A. Moulton,* 




Etta C. Temple, 


Eda C. Shapley, 




Bertie Tuttle, 


Frank Buttrick, 




Freddie A. Brown, 


James Hannon, 




Eddie Poole, 


Arlie XJ. Jackson. 




George W. Randall, 


George Jackson, 


* This is the fifth term that 




Frank Jackson, 


U. B. has not been tardy 




* Detained one day by snow. 


or absent. 



Mattie Houghton, 
Hattie Parker, 
Nellie Walker, 
Nellie White. 



SOUTH GRAMMAR. 



Emma L. Billings, 


Ellen M. Phelan. 


Mary Phelan. 


Emma M. Conant, 


Frank Tavlor, 




Lulu Moulton, 


Willie Warren, 




Hattie Moulton, 






Lizzie Plumlev, 






Etta Sawver, 






Michael Hannon, 






Charles Haynes, 






John P. Tenney, 







WEST PRIMARY. 



Lottie Handley, 
.Mary L. Tuttle, 
Lottie Richardson, 



Alice Guilford, 
Clara Tuttle. 



18 



ROLL OF HONOR, CONTINUED. 



Those who have not been ab- 
sent or tardy for one term. 



Those who have not been ab- 
sent or tardy for two terms. 



Those who have not been ab- 
sent or tardy for three terms. 



WEST GRAMMAR. 



Lizzie Robinson, 
Ella Teele, 
Delette Handley, 
Charles Handley, 
George Hutchins, 
Warren Stevens, 
Alphonzo Wyman, 



CENTER PRIMARY. 



Sarah E. Hammond. 



Anna Davis 
Erminie Davis, 
Mary Hammond. 



CENTER GRAMMAR. 



Carrie Jones, 
Annie Pike, 
Etta Taylor. 
Gilman Parlin. 



Flora Stearns, 
Viola Tuttle, 



Frank E. Pike. 



19 



TABULAR VIEW. 







a 




6 


o 


a 

V 


JD CO 


SCHOOLS. 


TEACHERS. 


o 

o i 


er month 

number 
alars. 


a 
a 

a 

03 

la 


■a 

£& 

a ~ 

~ o 


0> 

is » 

Sh « 

©° 


St 






© o 

5 s 


S '.2 s 




a 


■2 S 


tn CO 

■o a 




- 


a 

09 


tu jo 

« La 


u 

> 

< 


k5 


d 9> 
a - 
a ca 




SPRING TERM. 
















Tenter 1 Grammar, 
center, j Frimary? 


Miss Allie H. Burnham, 


2 


$36 00 


^32 


26.5 








13 


" Ina V. Austin, 


2 


32 00 


25 


21.2 


1 





9 


West. grammar, 
) Primary, 


" Grace F. Barnes, 


2 


35 00 


30 


26.8 





5 


20 


" S. Jennie Wheeler, 


2 


30 00 


41 


38.4 


3 





19 


South Grammar, 

!50UtH. |p rimary 


" Amelia D. Comstock, 


2\ 


35 00 


32 


26 





4 


12 


" Lottie C. Faulkner, 


21 


35 00 


44 


38 3 


1 





13 


East, 


" M. I. Spalding, 


21 


32 00 


27 


23.6 





6 


16 


South-East, 


" Grace A. Yose, 


21 


30 00 


16 


13.6 








4 


North, 


" Ella F. Reed, 


21 


20 00 


18 


14.2 


1 





18 




Totals, 


19| 


$291 00 


265 


228.6 


3 


15 


124 




FALL TERM. 
















Tenter \ Grammar, 
Center, j Primaryj 


Miss Allie H. Burnham, 


2 


$36 00 


34 


28.7 





5 


10 


" Ina V. Austin, 


2| 


32 00 


24 


18.7 


1 





12 


West Grammar, 
West - j Primary, 


" Grace F. Barnes, 


21 


35 00 


27 


23.6 





9 


7 


" Annie E. Hall, 


2 


30 00 


45 


38.5 


4 





21 


South. \ grammar, 
J Primary, 


" Amelia D. Comstock, 


21 


35 00 


38 


32.4 





7 


8 


" Lottie C. Faulkner, 


2\ 


35 00 15 


41.5 


1 





15 


East, 


" M. I. Spalding, 


2\ 


31 00 


18 


15.9 





5 


18 


South-East, 


" Grace. A. Vose, 


2i 


30 00 


15 


10.5 








7 


North, 


" Ella F. Reed, 
Totals, 


21 


26 00 


13 


11.8 


1 


1 


15 




20$ 


$293 00 


259 


221.0 


7 


27 


113 




WINTER TERM. 
















( Grammar, 
Center. } 


(Mr. J. H. Butler, 

( " E. F. Richardson, 


3 


$55 00 


38 


34 





21 


7 


( Primary, 


Miss Ada 0. Davis, 


3 


32 00 


40 


31.4 








32 


West 1 Grammar, 
west - | Primary, 


" J. S. Bartlett, 


H 


40 00 


39 


34. 





12 


56 


" Annie E. Hall, 


3\ 


36 00 44 


39 5 


2 





47 


South. grammar, 
\ Primary, 


" Amelia D. Comstock, 


3 


•'40 00 40 


36 5 





16 


13 


" Lottie C. Faulkner, 


I 


40 00 48 


37.9 








12 


East, 


" M. I. Spalding, 


34 00 


28 


24.5 





9 


12 


South-East, 


" Grace A. Vose, 


21 


30 00 


14 


11.9 


1 





9 


North, 


" Ella F. Reed, 
Totals, 
Aggregate for the year, 


31 


30 00 


16 


12.9 





2 
60 


14 




203 


$337 00307 


263 


3 


202 




GGi 


$921 00 


831 


713.2 


13 


102 


139 



Total average percentage of attendance during the year, 80. 



REPORTS 



OF THE 



SELECTMEN AND OTHER OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON, 



FEBRUARY 26, 1873, TO FEBRUARY 26, 1874, 



INCLUDING THE 



MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS IN 1873. 

ALSO, 

THE REPORT OF THE 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



boston: 
TOLMAN & WHITE, PRINTERS, 221 WASHINGTON STREET. 

1874. ' 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



APPROPRIATIONS AND 


RECEIPTS. 




Unexpended Balance of last year, 


$5,104 16 




Regular Town Grant, 


9,000 


00 




Town Grant for Schools, 


2,500 


00 




Town Grant for Highways, 


1,500 


00 




Overlay on Taxes, 


463 


81 




Armory rent for 1873, 


75 


00 




State Aid to January 1, 1873, 


392 


99 




Corporation Tax, 
National Bank Tax, 


620 
444 


77 
10 


State School Fund, 


153 


77 




Military Account, 


51 


50 




Old School House, South District, 


473 


50 




City of Boston, for 0. A. Whitney, 


9 


00 




Use of Town Hall, 


62 


00 




State Paupers, 


44 57 




Interest on Taxes, 


75 


00 




Auctioneer's License, 


2 


00 




Lumber from Pest House, 


1 


95 




Cash for Deed in Cemetery, 


1 


00 




Note, Mrs. P. V. Hapgood, 


400 


00 




Mr. F. Rouillard, 


800 


00 




J. E. Billings, 


200 


00 




Luther Conant, 


1,000 


00 




J. W. Livermore, 


600 


00 




Charles Morris, 


350 


00 




Patrick Farrell, 


400 


00 




Phineas Puffer, 


2,500 


00 




Isaac Reed, 


1,200 


00 




M. P. Hosmer, 


1,200 


00 




State Tax, 


1,777 


50 




County Tax, 


1,012 


64 




Dog Fund, 


92 


31 








OQO *A7 *7 






v« 


JAjt/WI VI 



EXPENDITURES. 

SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 

Paid G. D. Fletcher, South District, $678 38 

Luke Blanchard, West " 644 88 

Harris Cowdry, Centre " 636 50 

Henry Brooks & E. J. Bobbins, East, 319 84 

John Fletcher, 2nd, South East, 255 86 

Geo. H. Harris, North, 255 86 



62,791 32 



REPAIRS ON HIGHWAYS. 

Paid Charles Wheeler, $953 87 

A. H. Jones, 614 55 

Laying wall at Powder Mill Bridge, 28 75 

Lumber and labor at Powder Mill Bridge, 403 35 
Sluices, 77 85 

Luke Tuttle, for sluice, 9 90 







— $2,088 27 


BREAKING ROADS. 




,id Daniel Harris, 


$61 40 


Abel Farrar, 


8 


80 


Charles Wheeler, 


96 


00 


L. W. Piper, 


32 


60 


Warren F. Flagg, 


41 


00 


Thomas Taylor, 


4 


00 


Nathan Brooks, 


30 


90 


John Conant, 


50 


60 


Daniel Fletcher, 


70 


45 


A. H. Jones, 


81 


65 


Isaac Reed, 


23 


10 


Simon Tuttle, 


41 


30 


A. L. Tuttle, 


92 


00 


Luther Conant, 


9 


00 


Jonas K. Putney, 


8 


40 


Geo. H. Harris, 


4 


30 


Daniel Tuttle, 


2 


00 

$657 50 









SUPPORT OF POOR. 

Paid Worcester Hospital, for A. W. Jones, $230 83 

" " W. H.Oliver, 160 69 

Sarah Hunt, 31 00 

Mrs. W. Conant, for board of C.W.Edmonds, 14 50 

Joseph Reed, for board and care of 

Mrs. S. Spencer, 40 00 

Sally White, life support, 75 00 

" " 37 40 

Sarah B. Childs, 16 50 

Adeline Livingston, 2 13 

W. F. B. Whitney, 26 90 

O. A. Whitney, " 9 00 

W. Lumb and B. Page, State paupers, 70 00 

E. Oliver, care of O. E. Thorp, 40 00 

Coffin for O. E. Thorp, 13 00 

G. E. Curtain, at Reform School, 3 00 

Town Farm deficiency for 1871 and 1872, 40 46 

" " " " 1872 " 1873, 128 80 

$939 21 



TOWN DEBT. 

Paid William Wheeler, $500 00 

William D. Tuttle, 400 00 

Joseph P. Reed, 200 00 

Daniel Harris, 5 34 

Augustine Conant, 4,000 00 



INTEREST ON TOWN 


DEBT. 


Paid Augustine Conant, 


$241 21 


David M. Handley, 


210 00 


Joseph Barker, 
Cyrus Conant, 
D. J. Wetherbee, 


70 00 

140 00 

84 00 


F. Rouillard, 


117 37 


J. A. Piper, 
Daniel Harris, 


42 00 

75 74 


Luther Billings, 
Jonas K. Putney, 
Geo. W. Gates, 


14 00 

45 50 
14 00 


William Wheeler, 


26 33 


Joseph P. Reed, 
Isaac T. Flagg, 


13 53 
7 00 


H. J. Hapgood, 
Lewis Rouillard, 


28 00 
13 00 


Joseph Noyes, 
Calvin Harris, 


14 00 
14 00 


Elizabeth Hanscom, 


40 80 


Patrick Farrell, 


80 50 


John R. Whitcomb, 


35 00 


Josiah Dow, 


42 00 


James E. Billings, 


146 38 


William D. Tuttle, 


136 15 


John Grimes, 


21 00 


Geo. Reed, 


SI 00 


Geo. H. Harris, 


14 00 


John Wilson, 


35 00 


John Goldsmith, 


162 50 


PRINTING. 




Paid for reports for March and April, 
Warrants, 


$92 00 
10 00 


Posters, 


8 25 


Voting list, 


16 00 



$5,105 34 



$1,914 00 



$126 25 



STATE AID. 
Paid Hattie W. Wilder, 
Joanna Moulton, 
Rebecca C. Wright, 
Geo. W. Sawyer, 
A. R. Sumner, 



$96 


00 


48 


00 


48 


00 


36 


00 


36 


00 



CEMETERY EXPENSES. 
Paid John Fletcher, Jr., and W. D. Tuttle, 

for East Cemetery, $69 10 

Isaiah Reed, for West Cemetery, 39 62 

" " laying wall, 354 50 



SCHOOL HOUSES. 

Paid James Tuttle, South District, $1,344 53 

Geo. C. Wright, West " 942 94 

F. Rouillard, North " 2,995 61 

Daniel Fletcher, South East District, 1,282 45 

Luther Conant, Centre " 156 85 

James E. Billings, East " 50 78 



TOWN OFFICERS. 

Paid Joseph Noyes, services as Selectman 

for the year 1872, $45 00 

F. P. Wood, superintending schools, 90 00 

W. D. Tuttle, for taking inventory, 
making and copying taxes, writing 
bond and warrant, and making return 
to State, 36 00 

C. A. Harrington, taking inventory and 
making taxes, 

transcript of records, 

horse hire, 

Simon Tuttle, taking inventory and 
making taxes, 

William D. Tuttle, services as Town 
Clerk one year, 

J. E. Cutter, collecting taxes, 1872, 
" " notifying Town Officers to 

take oath of office, 1872 and 1873, 

James E. Billings, services as Selectman, 

Hiram J. Hapgood, services as Selectman. 

Simon Tuttle, services as Selectman, 



30 


00 


14 


40 


4 


00 


24 


75 


25 


00 


25 


00 


5 


76 


57 


00 


,46 


CO 


42 


00 



$264 00 



$463 22 



86,773 16 



$444 91 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Paid S. M. Osgood, rent of school room, 

O. E. Preston, damage bv defect in road, 
C. M. Lawrence, " " " " 

T. G. F. Jones, sealing weights and 

measures, 
F. P. Wood, journey to Lowell, in refer- 
ence to printing, 
N. E. Cutler, damage to settees used in 

West School, 
J. B. Porter, for gravel, 
Road scraper and repairs, 
Selling South school house, 
W. Littlefield, varnishing hearse, 
W. D. Tuttle, recording deeds, 
Do., copying records on school house case, 
Do., express and postage, 

W. D. Tuttle, journey to Sudbury to 

make out certificate of election, 
Do., recording 18 marriages, 
" 24 deaths, 

" 33 births, 

James D. "Wright, guide post, 
F. Dwight, attending funerals for 28 

persons, 
Making return of 23 deaths, 
Geo. W. Sawyer, taking care of town 

clock, 
23 gallons oil, 
Washing floor, 
13 chimneys, 
3 J feet wood, 
Opening hall, 
Repairing furnace, 
Painting Town Hall, 
" " pump, 

Tolling bell for 15 deaths, 
Shingling Almshouse and barn, 
J. E. Cutter, for coal and wood, Town 

Hall, 
Express, 

Expenses in Aaron Wood's case, 
Military May Parade, 
Discount on Taxes, 1873, 
Express, postage and stationery, 



$50 
14 
30 



00 
00 
00 



37 00 



1 50 



10 


00 


6 


00 


56 


74 


2 


50 


15 


00 


1 


30 


, 3 


00 


2 


55 


$2 


50 


2 


70 


4 


65 


16 


30 


13 


52 


84 


00 


5 


75 


10 


00 


7 


38 


5 


00 


1 


63 


1 


50 


34 


00 


4 


40 


4 


50 




50 


3 


00 


68 


67 


29 


70 




90 


3 


50 


51 


50 


684 


15 


6 


24 




— 81,275 58 



RECEIPTS FROM FEB. 26, 1873, TO FEB. 26, 1874. 

Unexpended balance as per report of Feb. 

26, 1873, $5,104 16 

Appropriations and receipts, 27,403 -41 



EXPENDITURES. 

Support of schools, 

Repairs on highways and bridges, 

Breaking roads, 

Support of the poor, 

Town debt, 

Interest on town debt, 

Printing, 

State aid, 

Oemeteiy expenses, 

School houses, 

Town officers, 

Miscellaneous, 

State tax, 

County tax, 



Balance in treasury Feb. 26th, 1874, $6,874 67 



$2,791 


32 


2,088 


27 


657 50 


939 


21 


5,105 


34 


1,914 


00 


126 


25 


264 


00 


463 


22 


6,773 


16 


444 


91 


1,275 


58 


1,777 


50 


1,012 


64 




825 632 90 







TOWN DEBT. 






F. Rouillard, 


$2,622 50 


J. E. Billings, 


214 


00 


Luther Conant, 


1,052 


11 


J. W. Livermore, 


630 


60 


Charles Morris, 


367 


15 


Patrick Farrell, 


416 


17 


Phineas Puffer, 


2,626 


87 


Isaac Reed, 


1,254 


80 


Ebenezer Conant, 


2,067 


66 


Joel Ilanscom, 


703 


80 


J. E. Billings, 


2,138 


07 


David M. Handley, 


3,054 


25 


I. T. Flagg, 


106 


38 


Calvin Harris, 


203 


03 


Oliver Whitcomb, 


507 


58 


J. K. Putney, 


693 


60 


James A. Billings, 


217 


00 


John Goldsmith, 


2,642 


18 


Amount carried forward. 




$21,517 75 



Amount brought forward, 


$21,517 75 


Joseph Barker, 


1,025 46 


D. J. Wetherbee, 


1,241 00 


H. J. Hapgood, 


410 96 


Lewis Rouillard, 


205 63 


Joseph Noyes, 


206 02 


J. A. Piper, 


616 05 


Luther Billings, 


217 34 


Simon Tuttle, 


610 50 


Josiah Dow, 


606 53 


Patrick Farrell, 


1,158 05 


John Grimes, 


303 50 


Geo. Peed, 


457 87 


Geo. H. Harris, 


200 70 


John Wilson, 


500 00 


Geo. W. Gates, 


212 75 


Daniel Harris, 


822 40 


Sarah C. Noyes, 


800 00 


Thomas F. Noyes, 


400 00 


Mrs. M. P. Hosmer, 


1,200 00 


Mrs. P. V. Hapgood, 


424 74 




«qq 137 05 






Amount due from State aid, 


300 00 


Estimated value of old school houses 


700 00 


From State, care of State paupers, 


158 00 


Due from Town Treasurer, 


6,874 67 8,032 67 


Balance against the town, 


825,104 58 


JAMES E. 


BILLINGS. ) Selectmen 


HIRAM J. 


HAPGOOD, \ of 


SIMON TUTTLE, ) Acton. 



Acton, Feb. 26, 1874. 



10 
REPORT OF THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

AT THE ALMSHOUSE IN ACTON, 

For the year ending April 1st, 1874. 



Articles 


on Hand, April 


1st, 1874. 


1 horse, 




$200 00 


9 cows, 




477 00 


4J tons of ha} 7 , 




99 00 


41 hens, 




30 75 


4 turkeys, 




6 00 


2 shotes, 




32 00 


Lard, 




l 50 


Pickles, 




2 00 


125 lbs. salt pork, 




12 50 


150 lbs. ham, 




19 50 


78 bush, potatoes, 




48 36 


Soap, 




3 75 


6 bush, oats, 




4 20 


6 bbls., . 




1 32 








RECEIPTS. 




Milk, 




$484 34 


Apples, 




433 07 


Berries, 




24 10 


Poultry, 




81 76 


Calves, 




72 45 


Eggs, 




36 26 


Potatoes, 




108 56 


Squash, 




1 91 


4 cows, 




179 50 


Pickles, 




83 


Tomatoes, 




49 


1 shote, 




3 60 


Straw, 




8 80 


Ashes and grease, 




4 26 


Peas, 




1 05 


Hay, 




80 50 


Grapes, 




1 60 


Wood, 




8 25 


Oats, 




2 80 

$1,534 13 



11 

EXPENDITURES. 



Corn and meal, 


$225 


05 


Plaster of Paris, 


1 


92 


Labor, 


92 


08 


Horse collar, 


5 


50 


Bug poison, 
4 cows, 


1 
211 


95 
00 


Feed for cows, 


16 


00 


Expenses laying out Mr. Thorp and Mr. 

Putty, 

Rope, 

Oil, 


Lumb, 3 
2 


00 
10 

50 

27 


Scraps, 

Crockery, 

Nails, 


3 
3 
3 


00 
40 
45 


Matches, 




65 


Lime, 




50 


Barrels, 


4 


36 


Pails, 




60 


Soda, 




42 


Tobacco, 


4 


69 


Yeast, 




08 


Vinegar, 


3 


81 


Saleratus, 




75 


Spices, 
Raisins, 


6 
2 


01 

48 


Bread, 


3 


90 


Rye meal 


3 


84 


Onions, 


1 


88 


Beef, 


90 


99 


Grass seed, 


11 


28 


Newspaper, 

"Wicking, 

Tea, 


2 


50 
08 
40 


Candles, 


3 


41 


Blueing, 




10 


Cream Tartar, 


1 


37 


Fish, 


4 


93 


Starch, 




€6 


Saltpetre, 
Rice, 




15 

88 


Coffee, 


5 


19 


Cheese, 


22 


49 


Flour, 


75 


50 


Beans, 


6 


51 



Amount carried forward^ $835 63 



12 



Amount brought over, 


$835 63 


Salt, 




5 21 


Cloth and Clothing, 




34 16 


Books, 




08 


Tools, 




4 78 


Soap, 




11 31 


Sugar, 




36 83 


Butter, 




45 77 


Molasses, 




15 33 


Calves, 




12 50 


Sawing lumber, 




75 


Use of bull, 




3 00 


Repairing shoes, 




1 78 


" harness, 




37 


Butchering, 




2 25 


Brooms, 




1 06 


Snuff, 




22 


Expenses marketing, 




17 50 


Blacking, 




12 


Stove, 




3 00 


Cider, 




50 


Poultry, 




5 50 


Oats, 




5 60 


Blacksmith's bill, 




8 69 


Filing saws, 




80 


Repairing pump, 




2 50 


Dr. Harris Cowdry's 


bill, 


12 50 


James E. Billings, services as Overseer 


of the 


Poor, 




16 00 


Hiram J. Hapgood, 


IC U 


" 12 00 


Simon Tuttle 


t< u 


" 12 00 


Services of Charles IV 


lorris, 


350 00 







$1,457 74 



Total amount of receipts, $1,534 13 

Tatal amount of expenditures, 1,457 74 

Due the treasury from town farm, $76 39 



Interest on the farm, $239 40 

Due the treasury from town farm, 76 39 

Cost of supporting poor on farm, $163 01 



13 

Victualling 351 travellers, $175 50 

Deduct support of poor on farm, 163 01 

$12 49 

Whole number of persons, exclusive of travellers, supported in 
the Almshouse, eight ; average number, four ; present number, 
four. 

Had it not been for victualling travellers on said farm, for the 
past year, the farm would have paid a net profit of $12.49, in- 
cluding interest on said farm. 

James E. Billings, ) n 
Hiram J. Hapgood, } u Z e ™ eers 
Simon Tuttle, ) °f Poor ' 

Acton, April 1, 1874. 



14 



REPORT OF TOWN CLERK FOR 1873. 



BIRTHS IX ACTON IN 1873. 

No. Date of Birth. Name of Child. Names of Parents. 

*■ 1. Jan 5, Arthur L. Reed, son of Isaac G. and J. Maria Reed. 

2. "8, Grace Norton Houghton, daughter of Warren and Lydia 

A. Houghton. 

3. " 19, Mildred Estelle Handley, daughter of William S. and 

S. Lizzie Handley. 

4. Feb. 2, Grace Annie Richardson, daughter of James E. and 

Sara R. Richardson. 

5. " 3, Eva Bassett, daughter of Joseph R. and Clara W. Bas- 

sett. 

6. " 17, Robert S. Wilson, son of Robert and Mary Ann 

Wilson. 

7. " 18, Charles Thomas Calder, son of Thomas and Maria 

Odder. 

8. " 22, John Ryan, son of John and Catherine Ryan. 

9. " 27, Frank Clement Soper, son of Joseph and Lucy J. 

Soper. 

10. March 25, Jonathan 8. McCarthy, son of Daniel and Mary 

McCarthy. 

11. April 15, Sarah Annie Edwards, daughter of Charles and 

Elizabeth Edwards. 

12. M 25, Herbert Ervin Temple, son of John and Lottie A. 

Temple. 

13. " 28, John AVm. Davis, son of John and Elizabeth Davis. 

14. May 3d, Gertrude May Guilford, daughter of Samuel A. and 

Nellie M. Guilford. 

15. " 21, Joanna Raddin, daughter of Patrick and Hannah 

Raddin. 

16. " 28, Mabel Elmira Tyler, daughter of Fred and Mary 

Tyler. 



15 



17. June 1, Emery Stanley Preston, son of Herbert E. and Emma 

Sophia Preston. 

18. " 2, Thomas Daily, son of Michael and Ann Daily. 

19. July 10, Benjamin Rice Caunter, son of John W. and Eliza- 

beth J. Caunter. 

20. Aug. 14, Eliza Ann Yapp, daughter of George and Sarah 

Yapp. 

21. " 25, John Henry Manion, son of John and Julia Manion. 

22. Sept. 11, Clara B. Robbins, daughter of Simon and Nancy D. 

Robbins. 

23. " 21, Maud Sawyer, daughter of Thomas J. and Kate W. 

Sawyer. 

24. " 26, Catherine Daily, daughter of John and Ellen Daily. 

25. Oct. 3, Louis Guy Mead, son of Oliver W. and Lucy M. 

Mead. 

26. " 13, Hattie Mabel Decoster, daughter of George H. 

and Lucy A. Decoster. 

27. Nov. 2, Clara Louisa Hammond, daughter of Thomas W. and 

Mary A. Hammond. 

28. Dec. 13, Varnum Pray Tuttle, son of Varnum and Mary M. 

Tuttle. 

29. " 14, Raymond Otis Littlefield, son of Hanson A. and 

Florence M. Littlefield. 

30. " 16, Bernice Carrie Whitcomb, daughter of Elwyn H. and 

May F. Whitcomb. 

31. « 26, &m -m-B«fc a daughter to David C. and Estella A. 

Cutler. 

32. " 31, Edward F. Brown, son of Charles and Elizabeth 

Brown. 

Males, 16 ; females, 16 ; total, 32. 



Omitted last year. 
1. Nov. 20, 1872, Lilla Jane Hurd, daughter of Joseph and Ellen 
Hurd. 



16 



MARRIAGES RECORDED IN ACTON IN 1873. 

No. Date of Marriage. Names of the Parties. 

1. Jan. 1, Mr. Calvin N. Holbrook and Miss Ellen A. Blanchard, 

both of Acton. 

2. Jan. 17, Mr. George A. Handley, of Actori, and Miss Faustina 

H. Wright, of Chelmsford. 

3. Feb. 27, Mr. F. Herbert Warren, of Stow, and Miss S. Jennie 

Wheeler, of Acton. 

4. March 1, Mr. Henry A. Jenkins and Mrs. Sarah A. Lewis, 

both of Acton. 

5. " 15, Mr. William Morehouse and Mrs. Sarah L. Atwood, 

both of Acton. 

6. April 16, Mr. German S. Lyon, of Acton, and Miss Sarah Lu- 

cincla Russell, of Westford. 

7. May 6, Mr. Gilman F. Pickens, and Miss Almeda A. Litchfield, 

both of Acton. 

8. " 20, Mr. Jonathan W. Loker and Miss Almira H. Burnham, 

both of Acton. 

9. June 4, Mr. H. Waldo Tuttle and Miss Lizzie S. Piper, both 

of Acton. 

10. July 24, Mr. Quincy A. Fletcher and Miss Augusta M. 

Wheeler, both of Acton. 

11. August 3, Mr. George F. Burnham and Miss Agnes F. Brooks, 

both of Acton. 

12. Sept. 21, Mr. John S. Potter, and Miss Susan R. Harris, both 

of Acton. 

13. Oct. 11, Mr. Ebenezer Davis and Miss Mattie Snow, both of 

Acton. 

14. Nov. 12, Mr. Granville Miles, of Concord, and Mrs. Lucretia 

E. Miles, of Marlborough. 

15. Dec 7, Mr. Abraham Tuttle and Miss Martha A. Putnam, 

both of Acton. 

16. " 7, Mr. Lorenzo E. Reed, of Boxborough, and Miss M. 

Ella Harris, of Acton. 

17. Dec. 24, Mr. Joseph E. Dole and Miss Ida I. Chase, both of 

Acton. 

18. " 24, Mr. Henry W. Richardson and Miss Mary H. Wood- 

ward, both of Acton. 

19. " 25, Mr. Edwin Tarbell and Miss Amelia D. Comstock, 

both of Acton. 



17 
DEATHS IN ACTON IN 1873. 

No. Date of Deaths. Name and age. 

1. Jan. 20, Mr. James Harris, aged 68 years, 3 mos. 

2. Feb. 1, Mrs. Sarah B. Tuttle, aged 75 years. 

3. " 28, Mrs. Rebecca, wife of Nathaniel Hapgood, aged 89 

yrs. 9 mos. 

4. March 15, William H. Hoffses, aged 14 yrs. 8 mos. 

5. April 26, Mrs. Mary, wife of Simon Hapgood, aged 82 yrs. 3 

mos. 1 day. 

6. May 5th, Mr. Abel Farrar, aged 76 yrs. 26 days. 

7. June 28, Miss Maria P. Hastings, aged 21 yrs. 10 mos. 

8. July 2, Morris A. Lane, aged 3 yrs. 3 mos. 

9. " 3, Mr. Jacob Houghton, aged 87 yrs. 

10. " 5, Mr. Elnathan Jones, aged 78 years. 

11. Aug. 15, Mr. Michael Phelan, aged 51 yrs. 7 mos. 22 days. 

12. " 17, Mr. William Reed, aged 69 years. 

13. " 23, Herbert E , son of John and Lottie A. Temple, aged 

3 mos. 29 days. 

14. " 26, Mrs. Emeline, wife of Guilford D. Fletcher, aged 36 

yrs. 9 mos. 21 days. 

15. Sept. 24, Mr. George Tufts, aged 72 yrs. 10 mos. 6 days. 

16. Sept. 27, Miss Hattie F. Gibbs, aged 23 yrs. 4 mos. 4 days. 

17. Oct. 19, Mrs. Louisa O., wife of T. G. F. Jones, aged 46 years. 

18. Nov. 9, Mr. Lyman H. Stevens, aged 24 years 10 mos. 15 dys # 

19. " 12, Mr. William Lamb, aged 52 yrs. 

20. " 16, Mr. Oliver Emerson Thorp, aged 76 years. 

21. " 18, Mr. Thomas G. F. Jones, aged 51 years, 10 mos. 

22. " 30, Mrs. Assenath, widow of Nathan Wright, aged 83 

yrs. 8 mos. 11 days. 

23. Dec. 9, Elizabeth, daughter of Michael and Mary A. Hannon, 

aged 3 yrs. 11 mos. 9 days. 

24. " 9, Mary, daughter of Daniel and Ellen Calanan, aged 

5 years, 8 mos. 9 days. 



18 



DOGS LICENSED IN 1873. 



Name of Owner. No. 



Francis Hosmer, 

Henry Brooks, 

Silas Conant, Jr., 

Daniel Tuttle, 

Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee, 

Elnathan Jones, Jr., 

Varnum Tuttle, 

T. J. Sawyer, 

G. H. S. Houghton, 

Levi Houghton, 

A. & O. W. Mead, 
Daniel Harris, 

B. R. Joyce, 
Horace Tuttle, 2d, 
John W. Randall, 
Freeman Randall, 
Emery D. Lothrop, 
Daniel Wetherbee, 
Daniel J. Wetherbee, 
Geo. C. Conant, 
Solon A. Robbins, 
Geo. V. Mead, 
Emerson F. Fuller, 
Daniel H. Farrar, 
W. Wallace Wooster, 
Jos. R. Bassett, 

A. S. Fletcher, 
Henry Shapley, 
Chas. A. Harrington, 
Elwyn H. Whitcomb, 
S. M. Osgood & Co., 

Males 61, at $2 each, 
Females 2, at $5 each, 



Name'of owner. 


No. 


C. W. Fletcher, 


1. 


W. E. Faulkner, 


1. 


Edwin Tarbell, 


1. 


S. Taylor Fletcher, 


1. 


A. Jones Fletcher, 


1. 


John C. Keyes, 
Theodore F. Karcher, 


1. 
1. 


John Fletcher & Sons, 


1. 


Henry C. Wheeler, 
John Conant, 


1. 
1. 


Aaron C. Handley, 
E. J. Robbins, 


1. 
1. 


James W. Wheeler, 


1. 


Lewis Beck, 


1. 


Augustus Fletcher, 


1. 


Henry Haynes, 
Abel Farrar, 


1. 
1. 


Francis Robbins, 


1. 


Joel B. Baker, 


1. 


Horace Tuttle, 


1. 


Henry M. Smith, 
Robert Fiske, 


1. 
1. 


J. R Houghton, 


1. 


L. W. Piper, 
Josiah Piper, 
Jona. A. Piper, 
Samuel K. Williams, 


1. 
1. 
1. 

2. 


Moses Taylor, 
Geo. C. Wright, 


1. 
1. 


Chas. Wheeler, 


1. 


$122 00 




10 00 


as oa 



WM. D. TUTTLE, Town Clerk. 



Acton, March 26, 1874. 



THE ANNUAL REPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 






OF TH B 



TOWN OF ACTON, 



OR TH K 



SCHOOL YEAR 1873-74 



BOSTON: 

Tolman & White, Printers, No. 221 Washington Street. 

1874. 



REPORT 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

We, the undersigned, as School Committee, would submit 
the following report : 

In making this report it is very gratifying to us to be able 
to say that during the past year, although we have been 
obliged to introduce new teachers, and encounter the usual 
difficulties in making our schools completely successful, there 
has not been, throughout the year, what can be called a fail- 
ure, a thing which it is doubtless impossible to say at the 
close of very many school years. Though during the year we 
have lost from our board of instruction two of our most suc- 
cessful and experienced teachers, we have secured others in 
the different schools who have made our corps of teachers, 
taken as a whole, very efficient. We think that one reason 
why our schools have been so successful during the past year 
is owing to the fact that we have not only had good teachers, 
as a rule, but the same teachers have, in several instances, 
taught at least two consecutive terms, which is quite desira- 
ble. There seems to be springing up in town a sentiment 
in favor of retaining a teacher, if she has had a fair degree 
of success, at least two terms, which promises well for the 
future prosperity of the schools. We have been very 
much pleased with the forbearance, in the matter of crit- 
icism, which has characterized the people of the several 
parts of the town during the past year. It is sometimes the 
case that what would have been otherwise a successful school 
is utterly ruined by injudicious and unjust criticism. In one 
or two cases we think it probable that the success of schools 
has been imperilled and impaired by such criticism during the 
past year, but, on the whole, the conduct of the people in 
this regard has been commendable and a matter for conarat- 



ulation on the part of all interested in the welfare of the 
schools. As we took occasion to say in our last report, we 
would say now, that, if any one sees defects in a school and 
thinks that in certain respects it might be improved, he would 
render the cause of education a great service by communi- 
cating the matter to those who have charge of the schools, 
instead of canvassing the matter in public, before scholars 
and others whose confidence in the school will be impaired 
thereby. The School Committee desire information respect- 
ing the state of the schools from those who may be able to 
inform them, viewing the schools from a different stand- 
point, and they invite criticism respecting any method in the 
management of the schools, which may have been adopted, 
but think it for the best interest, and essential to the success 
of the schools, that the matter shall be brought before them 
with as little publicity as possible. 

We have been much gratified during the past year by the 
interest manifested in the schools by a full attendance upon 
the examinations, which were held at the end of the fall and 
winter terms. Moreover, we find from an examination of 
the different reports, that a large number have visited the 
schools during the term. Such visits on the part of parents 
and others are very stimulating to both teachers and scholars. 
We wish that others might aid in promoting the efficiency of 
our schools in this way. We have noticed that the most in- 
telligent and judicious criticism of the schools always comes 
from those who are most in the habit of visiting them. We 
think that the new school-houses in town have not only in- 
creased the teachers' and scholars' interest in the schools, 
but that they have also had a good effect in promoting a gen- 
eral interest in the matter of education, as shown by the vis- 
its. 

New School-Houses. — During the past year it has been 
our privilege to see the North and South-East Schools estab- 
lished in pleasant school-rooms, so that it is possible to 



sa} r now that every school in town is amply provided with 
school accommodations. There are probably few towns, if 
any, in the Commonwealth, having the limited population and 
valuation of Acton, which have more beautiful or expensive 
school-buildings, and, though the accomplishment of this fact 
may necessitate self-sacrifice on the part of some to pay the 
consequent taxes, it is something that we justly may be proud 
of, and which will, in more ways than one, promote the best 
interests of the town. 

Difficulties in Securing Perfect Schools. — But 
while the review of the past year affords us so many reasons 
for gratulation, we would not imply that we think the schools 
have been perfect during the year, or that the methods pur- 
sued have been faultless. This is not to be expected imme- 
diately. Though the committee may have very well-defined 
ideas of the qualities of a model school, and the qualifications 
of a model teacher, they may find the scholars so constituted 
as not to be easily moulded into such a school, and not be 
able to secure teachers whose methods are in every respect 
according to their ideas, or who can change their methods so 
as to conform to their ideas, without greatly impairing their 
usefulness. For example, in the matter of recitation, we 
think it very important, on the one hand, that scholars 
should acquire habits of accuracy, and, on the other hand, 
that they should acquire the ideas and principles of the subject 
rather than the words of the book. But the natural ten- 
dency is to an inaccurate and superficial committal of the 
recitations, or to a slavish adherence to the words of the 
text-books. Of the two evils just mentioned, of course the 
latter is to be preferred, as such a habit trains the memory 
and develops a habit of patient application, but we wish it 
to be understood by the teachers as well as the people, that 
this method is not according to our ideal of the perfect re- 
citation, and, should we continue in charge of the schools, 
we hope as soon as possible, to reach the happy mean between 



the two extremes above referred to. However, there has 
come to be in our schools, with scarcely an exception, a 
thoroughness and accuracy, in the committal of recitations, 
which is most commendable, and which, if properly guarded, 
will secure to us an eminent degree of success in the future. 

Variety of Studies. — Some may think that we have too 
great a variety of studies in our schools, but it is our im- 
pression that it is necessary to the interest of the schools that 
there should be something of a variety. Scholars become 
tired of pursuing simply the common branches of knowledge 
which they have dwelt upon ever since they began to attend 
school, and to take up some new branch, — of natural science, 
e. g., secures to them a new interest in their other studies ; 
so that many claim a scholar will learn more in the fundamen- 
tal branches by pursuing some study that is usually consid- 
ered a little above the common ransre of studies. 



Natural Science. 

We would here take the opportunity to remark that it 
would afford us satisfaction to see more attention devoted to 
the study of Natural Science, in our schools. There is noth- 
ing more useful or practical than the principles of these 
studies ; and as we believe they will not detract from, but add 
to the interest in the other studies, we hope that if scholars 
are inclined to pursue them at any time parents will encour- 
age them in it. Several text-books, well adapted to the use 
of common schools, have been published of late. For ex- 
ample, we have been much pleased with a book upon Natural 
Science, entitled Hooker's Child's Book of Nature. We 
think that it would be well for some of our younger scholars 
to pursue such a study as this instead of beginning to study 
Grammar so early as to acquire a dislike for it. 

It is said that, if it is desired to develop in a child a taste 
for reading, the best way to begin is by presenting something 
easily understood, and interesting on account of its subject 



matter, and then to rise gradually to the more instructive 
reading matter. So it seems to us, if we would inspire our 
scholars with a taste for study (our schools can not attain to 
any great success unless the scholars have such a taste), we 
must proceed in a similar way. We hope that some im- 
provement may be made in our method of instruction in this 
direction during the year to come. 

Change of Text-Books. 

During the past year, we have made nb formal change of 
text-books, though we have prepared the way for a chauge 
of geographies by introducing anew series (Miss Hall's Our 
World), into the larger schools, as new books were wanted. 
The smaller book thus tried, is an assured success, and we 
think there can be no doubt but what the larger one will be 
equally successful. The larger one cannot be thoroughly 
tested until scholars pass into it from the smaller book, as 
the smaller is intended as a preparation for the larger. We 
are pleased with this book, not simply because we consider 
it an excellent treatise upon geography, but because it in- 
cludes so much, not usually included in geographies, which 
is of great interest to scholars. It is a compendium of his- 
tory as well as a geography. No doubt our scholars find it 
somewhat difficult at first, but as they become familiar with 
its method, it will be more easily committed and will 
secure, if thoroughly mastered, a collection of information 
which will be invaluable. We are happy to say that 
the change has been effected thus far, not only without any 
extra expense, but at an actual saving to those who have had 
books to buy, as it has been introduced into new classes only. 
We would recommend that the introduction of these books 
be continued until they completely replace those which have 
been used in our schools heretofore. Besides the change in 
geographies, a change in reading books seems imperative ; 
1st, from the fact that these in use at the present time have 
been used so long that the pieces have become perfectly 



8 

familiar to the scholars from hearing others read them ; and, 
2d, from the fact that reading books of so much higher char- 
acter have been published that, in justice to those who have 
to purchase new books, a change seems to be required. Two 
new series of readers have just been published. One by the 
author of the book now in use, the other by Monroe, the 
eminent elocutionist. Each has points of superiority over 
the other, but in the selection of either, we cannot fail to 
secure a high order of books. It may be well to introduce 
the readers in the gradual way which has been pursued in the 
introduction of the geographies, so that the change will be 
hardly noticeable at first and will be brought about without 
extra expense ; though we think there should be no great 
delay in securing such a marked improvement in books. 

Map Drawing. 

In our last report we recommended that the people of the 
several districts should make an effort to secure some maps 
and charts for the use of the several schools. In the south- 
east district, largely through the exertions of Lester Fletcher, 
one of the scholars, a very pretty collection of maps has 
been secured by private subscription. But the want of maps 
in several of the schools has been supplied by maps drawn 
upon the black-boards, by the scholars. We consider this 
an excellent practice, and hope that it may be pursued in all 
our schools to as large an extent as possible. 

But without lingering longer upon the consideration of our 
school system taken as a whole, we invite your attention to 
the following notice of the teachers and schools considered 
by themselves. We will mention the schools in an order 
determined by their number of scholars, in each district, 
mentioning the Grammar school first. 

South Grammar. The spring and fall terms were taught 
by Miss Amelia Comstock, whose name has been men- 
tioned in this connection in each annual report for many 



years, and in whose praise little or nothing remains to 
be said. We will simply say that the school has never 
appeared better than during these terms. The exami- 
nation at the close of the fall term was very successful, 
and was made more pleasant from the fact that the 
scholars who had enjoyed Miss Comstock's labors for so 
many years, took this opportunity to manifest their appreci- 
ation of her services and their personal love for her by appro 
priate gifts. As Miss Comstock left our corps of teachers 
she bore with her not only the love and good will of her 
former pupils, but of the school committee as well. 

The winter term was taught by Miss Ada C. Davis. Miss 
Davis was favorably noticed as a teacher in our last annual 
report, and we shall have occasion to refer to her again in 
this present report. In this connection we will simply say, 
that although her school was large, and had had for many 
years a teacher of experience and marked ability, and though 
she labored under the disadvantage of not having had a very 
extended experience, she had a good degree of success. In- 
deed we may say that the examination which closed her 
school was one of the most successful that we have wit- 
nessed. 

South Primary. The spring and fall terms of this school 
also were taught by the former teacher, Miss Lottie C. 
Faulkner, who conducted the school with the same eminent 
success which has characterized her labors heretofore. As 
we said in our last report, she possesses a gift which makes 
her peculiarly well adapted to the work of instructing young 
children. We despair of rinding another teacher so well 
adapted to this difficult work in every respect. The chil- 
dren of this school also, at the close of the fall term, made 
their teacher some fitting and beautiful presents in token of 
their grateful love. Miss Faulkner may feel that, as she re- 
tires from the work of teaching, she bears with her the best. 
wishes of all interested in the success of the school, for 



10 

whose best interests she labored so strenuously for so many 
years. The winter term of this school was taught by Miss 
Ida C. Dadman, who, though somewhat lacking in the faculty 
of government, considering everything, had a fair degree of 
success. 

West Grammar. The spring and fall terms of this 
school were taught by Miss Ada C. Davis. Considering the 
limited amount of experience which Miss Davis had had be- 
fore she undertook this school, we feared for her success, 
but the examination at the close of the fall term proved her 
labors very successful here, as elsewhere. She put her 
whole heart into the work and deserved success. The winter 
term was taught by Miss Abbie Allen, a teacher of ripe ex- 
perience, and a real acquisition to our board of instruction, 
which we hope to be so fortunate as to retain. Miss Allen 
seemed interested in the personal welfare of all her scholars, 
and secured their love to a marked degree. The examina- 
tion at the end of the term was very satisfactory and was 
made peculiarly pleasant from the fact that the scholars took 
this opportunity to present to their teacher some fitting 
tesitmonials of their regard. 

West Primary. This school was taught throughout the 
year by Miss Annie Hall, who has been so highly commended 
in previous reports that little remains to be said. We will 
say, however, that under Miss Hall's tuition we have been 
able to see a steady improvement in order, as ' well as in 
mental growth. We feel that we are highly favored in hav- 
ing the continued labors of such an efficient teacher. We 
were very much gratified with the examination which closed 
the last term of the year. The scholars in this school also 
made their teacher the recipient of a beautiful present in 
token of their love. It gives us great pleasure to record the 
presentation of so many tributes to deserving teachers. We 
hope that our next report may contain similar notices. 



11 

Centre Grammar. This school was taught throughout the 
year by Miss Junia S. Bartlett, whose thorough method of 
instruction has been productive of great good in developing 
careful habits and independence in the preparation of recita- 
tions, which promises much for the success of the school in the 
future. Some interested in the school may have thought that 
this teacher did not render the scholars sufficient assistance 
in the acquisition of their lessons, and left them to rely too 
much upon their power of memory in recitation, and it is our 
opinion that, were her method to be pursued continuously, 
with the grade of scholars in our schools, it would be open 
to this criticism ; but, as we have said, in its having been 
pursued up to the present time, we think the result has been 
good. The scholars have secured a habit of accuracy, now, 
which will, in our belief, render more assistance from the 
teacher safe aud expedient. 

Centre Primary. This, like the Grammar school, has 
enjoyed the labors of the same teacher, Miss Annie C. 
Tucker, throughout the year. 

Miss Tucker, like two other teachers mentioned in this re- 
port, possessed the faculty of interesting small children to 
an eminent degree, though we have no doubt of her ability 
to teach a Grammar school equally well. The examination 
at the close of the winter term was very gratifying ; not only 
was it commendable to the teacher but to the scholars as 
well. 

North School. This school was taught throughout the 
year, by Miss Ella Reed, who has been so favorably men- 
tioned in previous reports that little if anything remains to 
be said. We will simply say that Miss Reed seems to lose 
no interest or enthusiasm by a long continuance in the school. 
At no time has the school seemed to us in a better condition 
than during the last year. The examination at the close of 
the last term was very satisfactory. 



12 

East School. The spring and fall terms of this school 
were taught by Miss C. M. Parker, who, though not success- 
ful in creating a high degree of enthusiasm in the scholars, 
labored diligently and earnestly for the good of the school, 
with a fair degree of success. 

The winter term was taught by Miss Lizzie L. Keyes. 
This was Miss Keyes' first experience in teaching, but she 
devoted herself with all earnestness to her work, and consider- 
ing the fact that she had had no previous experience, was 
successful. The examination at the close of the term was 
very gratifying to those interested in the success of the school. 

Southeast School. The spring term of this school was 
taught by Miss Ada F. Goddard, a teacher of experience 
and ability. She devoted herself to her work and the school 
gave proof of improvement under her charge. We were not 
able to be present at the examination which closed the term, 
but have been informed on good authority that it was quite 
successful. 

The fall and winter terms were taught by Miss Ellen O. 
Clark, a teacher of experience and ability not only, but of 
such attractive ways, that she called out the love and excited 
the enthusiasm of the scholars to a marked degree. For 
several terms this school had lacked animation, but under 
her charge, the scholars seemed intensely interested. We 
wish that Miss Clark might be retained in the school. 

In the above reports too little space may have been given 
to the good .offices of scholars and parents in making the 
schools successful ; but we would have it understood that, in 
our opinion, when schools have been successful, it has been 
largely owing to such cooperation, as without it, success in 
any school is impossible, however able and earnest the teacher 
may be. 

Appended are the usual statistical reports, which we 



13 



commend to the careful consideration of all interested in our 
schools. 



Kespectfully submitted. 



Luke Blanchard, 
Guilford D. Fletcher, 
George H. Harris, 
Harris Cowdrey, 
Elbridge J. Robbins, 
John Fletcher, 2d, 



School Committee 

of 
Acton. 



F. P. Wood, Superintendent of Schools. 






14 



ROLL OF HONOR. 



Those who have not been ab- 
sent or tardy for one term. 



Those -who have not been ab- 
sent or tardy lor two terms. 



Those who have not been ab- 
sent or tardy for three terms. 



West Grammar. 



Ella Teele, 


Fannie Gould, 


Clara Tuttle, 


Nellie Walker, 


Lottie Handley, 


Inez Wvman, 


Erne Wright, 


Emma Mead, 


Arthur Houghton, 


Oswald L. Dart, 


Georgie Mead. 


Alfonso Wyman. 


Edgar Hall, 
John Hoar, 










George Hutchins, 






Warren Stevens. 







West Primary. 



Alice F. Guilford, 


Mav A. Blanchard, 


Annie M. Blanchard, 


Addie S. Houghton, 


Minnie R. Hart, 


Allie H. Gilmore, 


Fanny M. Houghton, 


Mattie S. Houghton, 


Fred W. Gilmore, 


Millie Handley, 


Julia S. Lane, 


Fred S. Mead,* 


Hattie A. Parker, 


Lottie Richardson, 


Bertie F. Mead.* 


Nellie S. White, 


Mary L. Tuttle, 




Arthur Blanchard, 


Arthur F. Bradford. 




George D. Foye, 


Freddie Holden, 




Charlie W. Foye, 


Willie F. Kelley. 




Eddie B. Hoar, 


Bertie Wright. 




Crosby Hoar, 




*Fred S. Mead, aged 11 years, 


Clesson J. Parker, 




and Bertie F. Mead, aged 7£, 


Frank Teele, 




have not been tardv or ab- 


Charlie H. Hopkins, 




sent since they began to go 


Elmer A. Handley. 




to school. 



South Grammar. 



Emma L. Billings, 


Alice E. Davidson, 




Emma M. Conant, 


Nettie C. Fuller, 




Emma J. Handley, 


Ida F. Wilder, 




Emma E. Jordan, 


Lucv A. Jones, 




Mary Markham, 


Usher J. Brown, 




Ellen M. Phelan, 


Frank H. Bulette. 




Marv Phelan, 






Ida F. Wilder, 
Norman Davidson, 










George Haynes, 






Walter Hay ward, 






Sidney Richardson, 






Eddie Poole, 






Willie H. Wilbur. 







South Primary. 



Susie E. Billings, 


Emily G. Hannon, 




Gertie Clark, 


Carrie L. Shapley. 




Josie Hannon, 






Eva C. Shapley, 






Ed a Shapley, 






Mabel Richardson, 






Hiram E. Gates, 






Arlie U. Jackson, 






S. Bertie Tuttle, 






Charlie Worcester. 










15 



Roll of Honoj-, continued. 



Those who have not been ab- 
sent or tardy for one term. 



Those who have not been ab- 
sent or tardy for two terms. 



Those who have not been ab- 
sent or tardy for three terms. 



Centre Grammar. 



Flora Stearns, 
Freddy Noyes, 
George Tuttle. 



Centre Primary. 



Mary Waldron, 


Anna Davis, 


Erminnie L. Davis, 


Willie Cohollon, 


Sarah E. Hammond. 


Mary A. Hammond, 


Willie Davis, 




Etta Tuttle. 


John Kingsley, 






Harris Tuttle, 






Horace Tuttle, 






Herbert Robbins. 







South-East. 



Estelle E. Mathews, 
E. Eddie Fletcher. 


Mattie C. Pratt, 
George E. Johnson, 
Laurin W. Pratt,* 
Eddie F. Pratt, 
Wm.H. Treble. 
*Absent two days on 


account 


Estelle D. Heath,* 
Emma A. Pratt, 
Mabel G. Pratt, 
Lester Fletcher. 

♦Absent one day on account 




of sickness. 




of snow. 



East School. 



Bessie Ball, 
Annie Elliot, 
Nixon Ball, 
Frank Billings, 
Carlton Conant, 
Philip Veno. 



Abbie Fiske. 



North School. 



Lizzie Ryan. 
Hattie Smith, 
Julia I. Rose, 
Carrie E. White, 
George A. Smith, 
George Rose. 



Cora Rouillard. 



Elmer Rouillard. 



16 



TABULAR AQEW. 







c 


~ <5 




« a >> 








~S 




d 


> 
••a 


2 


"° £ 






"3 

o 


o 

s 


u 

fl — 


ait 

a 


o tt 

•o «e 


fct 


CO <0 

"Si 


SCHOOLS. 


TEACHERS. 




f-l 

ft 


II 


"8 




OB 


O eJ 






^S 


DO 


no 

Si 


4> 

9T 


il 


IE 


3g 






p 


to 






3 


s 


ss 






(V 


i 


fc 


5 


s 


3 


1* 




Spring Term. 
















CVntre (Grammar, 
centre. { p rim ary, 


Miss J. S. Bartlett, 


2 


$35 00 


34 


24 





7 


13 


" Annie E. Tucker, 


2 


32 00 


30 


26 


1 





10 


Wpst i Grammar, 
west. |p rirnaryi 


" Ada C. Davis, 


2 


36 CO 


24 


19.5 





4 


7 


" Anna E. Hall, 


2 


36 00 


42 


38.5 








29 


South 1 Grammar, 
South. ( Primary) 


" Amelia D. Comstock, 


21 


36 00 


36 


30.1 





11 


16 


" Lottie C Faulkner, 


2 4 


36 00 


51 


40.7 


3 





15 


East, 


" C. M. Parker, 


2 


36 00 


16 


12.3 





1 


8 


South-East, 


" Ada F. Goddard, 


% 


36 00 


15 


12.5 





1 


6 


North, 


" Ella F. Reed, 
Totals, 


26 00 


20 


14.6 





1 


14 




19 


$309' 00 


^08 


218.2 


4 


25 


118 




Fall Term. 
















n».+, A f Grammar, 
Centre, j p rim ary, 


Miss J. S. Bartlett, 


9 


§35 00 


34 


27.8 





8 


5 


" Annie E.Tucker, 


1 


32 (0 


35 


30.25 








11 


West j Grammar, 
west. | l»rimary, 


" Ada C. Davis, 


36 00 


30 


27 





5 


24 


" Anna E. Hall, 


01 


36 00 


41 


38 








19 


Smith I Grammar, 
South. jp rimar y i 


" Amelia D. Comstock, 


H 


36 00 


42 


36.8 





10 


10 


" Lottie C. Faulkner, 


n 


36 00 


43 


86.75 


1 





8 


East, 


" C. M. Parker, 


36 00 


20 


16 





2 


9 


South-East, 


" Ellen 0. Clark, 


2 


40 00 


17 


14.7 








14 


North, 


" Ella F. Reed, 
Totals, 


91 


26 00 


17 


13.4 





1 


19 




204 


$313 00 


279 


240.7 


1 


26 


119 




Winter Term. 
















Tpntre (Grammar, . 
centre. J p ri mary, 


Miss J. S. Bartlett, 


34 


$40 00 


34 


30 





21 


36 


" Annie E. Tucker, 


3 


36 00 


46 


38.25 





1 


26. 


West Grammar, 
V> est, | p rimar y f 


" Abbie H. Allen, 


34 


40 00 


38 


35 





16 


53 


" AnnaE. Hall, 


S| 


36 00 


40 


37.9 








48 


., ( Grammar, 
South, {primary/ 


" Ada C.Davis, 


2| 


40 00 


53 


46.64 





18 


16 


'• IdaT. Dadmun, 


2j 


40 00 


45 


38.77 








8 


East, 


; ' Lizzie L. Keyes, 


2-| 


20 00 


21 


19.6 





5 


21 


South-East, 


" Ellen 0. Clark, 


3 


40 00 


18 


15.9 





2 


6 


North, 


" Ella F. Reed, 

Totals, 
Aggregate for the year, 


30 00 


22 


17 





3 


31 




25| 


$332 00 


317 


289.06 





60 255 




65 


$954 00 


864 


748 


5 


117 


492 



Total average percentage of attendance during the year, 85. 






17 



FINANCIAL 



SOUTH SCHOOL. 



Drawn from the treasury, 


$678 38 


Received from the town of Stow, 


16 45 


Balance from last year, 


15 77 


Paid teachers, 


$534 00 


for fuel, 


88 00 


" care of house and incidentals, 


35 59 


Balance to new account, 


53 01 



$710 60 



$710 60 
Guilford D. Fletcher, Committee. 



WEST SCHOOL. 

Appropriation, $644 88 

Received from out-of-town scholars, 11 00 

Balance from last year, 29 58 

Paid teachers, 
for fuel, 
" care of house, &c, 
Balance to new account, 



$570 00 


65 


23 


24 


87 


25 


36 



$685 46 



$685 46 
Luke Blaxchard, Committee. 



EAST SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last vear, 



Paid teachers, 
for fuel, 
u care of house, &c, 
Balance to new account, 



$319 


84 


4 


52 


$244 


50 


51 


66 


20 


29 


7 


91 



$324 36 



$324 36 
Henrt Brooks and E. J. Robbins, Committee. 



18 



SOUTHEAST SCHOOL. 



Drawn from the treasury, 
Balance from last year, 



Paid teachers, 
•for fuel, 

" taking care of house, &c, 
Balance to new account, 

$257 83 

John Fletcher, 2d, Committee. 



$255 


88 


1 


95 


$230 00 


12 


00 


7 


00 


8 


83 



$257 83 



NORTH SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 
Balance from last year, 

Paid teachers, 
for fuel, 
" care of house, &c, 
Balance to new account, 



$255 86 


11 


22 


$199 


50 


57 


50 


8 


48 


1 


60 



$267 08 



$267 08 
George H. Harris, Committee. 



CENTRE SCHOOL. 
Drawn from the treasury, 

Paid teachers, 
for fuel, 
" taking care of house, &c, 
Balance to new account, 


$514 00 
70 75 
33 75 
18 00 


$636 50 

$636 50 
nmittee. 


Harris Cowdrey, Cot 



Amount of mone}*- raised by the town, $2,500 00 

Income from the State School Fund, 153 77 

" dog fund, 92 31 



Total for school purposes, $2,746 08 

Number of children reported by the Assessors between the ages 
of five and fifteen, 291. 

Sum appropriated by the town for each scholar, $8.60. 



REPORTS 



SELECTMEN AND OTHER OFFICERS 



TOWN OF ACTON, 



February 26, 1874, to February 26, 1875, 



INCLUDING Till 



MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS IX 1874, 



THE REPORT OF THE 

| SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



ACTON: 
ACTON PATRIOT .1015 PRINT. 

187.">. 



Selectmen's Report. 



APPROPRIATIONS AXD 


RECEIPTS. 




Unexpended Balance of last year, 


#6.674 


67 




Regular Town Grant, 


9,000 


00 




Town Grant for Schools, 


2,000 


00 




Town Grant for Highway]?, 


2,500 


00 




Overlay on Taxes. 


60 


17 




Corporation Tax. 


564 


95 




National Bank Tax. 


oil 


47 




State Aid to January 1, 1874, 


264 


00 




State School Fund. 


219 


05 




Contagious Diseases. 


157 


69 




State Paupers. 


64 00 




West Cemetery, 


12 


84 




East Cemetery. 


21 


00 




North School and Furniture. 


103 


50 




Interest on School House Money, 


3 


23 




Income of Town Farm, April 1st. 1874 


76 


39 




Dog Fund. 


167 


01 




Use of Town Hall and Cellar, 


62 


■zrj 




Wood and Lumber Sold on Town Farm. 915 


00 




Oliver W. Drew, 


600 


00 




State Tax. 


1.580 


00 




County Tax. 


1,081 


19 






S. 


$26,668 


41 


EXPENDITURE 




SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 






Paid James Tuttle, South District. 


$688 


38 




doseph Xoyes. West " 


644 


88 




Harris Co wdry. Centre ki 


640 


00 




Elbridge J. Robbins, East. 


298 


34 




John Fletcher. 2d, South East. 


255 


86 




George H. Harris. North, 


263 


86 








- 12,791 


32 


REPAIRS ON SCHOOL 


HOUSES. 




Paid Luke Blanehard, West District, 


$23 


25 




Harris Co wdry, Centre i-/ 


9 


00 




Elbridge J. Robbins, East *• 


9 


51 




John Fletcher ,12d. South East, 


6 48 


9A 



REPAIRS ON HIGHWAYS. 

Paid E. II. Cutler, labor in 1872, # -1 50 

" " fci breaking roads 1$72, 35 37 
Simon Tuttle, North Acton, 4 83 

Levi Houghton, railing road, 1872—4, 7 00 
E. C. Parker, labor in 1872, 5 50 

A. H. Jones, railing road^near J. Holmes 

& Co's Mill, 77 61 

F.H.Whitcomb, breaking roads, '73-74 31 60 



1166 41 



REGULAR HIGHWAY WORK. 

Paid Charles Wheeler. $1,227 83 

A. H. Jones, 850 42 



*2.078 2* 



BY ORDER OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS. 

Paid Charles Wheeler, road inYWest 

Acton. $1,465 87 

J. E. Billings road near 1). J. 

Wetherbee, 52 50 



BOOKS AM) PRINTING. 

Paid James Tuttle, books for South r School $2 29 
John Fletcher, 2d, " S. E. " 6 80 
Luke Blanchard, " West " 3 00 

Tolman & White, for 450 Selectmen 

Reports, 14 00 

Tolman <£ White, 500 Selectmen's 

and other Officers Reports, 
Do., Warrants, 
Do., 100 Rules and Regulations 

for School Houses, 
Pratt & Fletcher, $ 500 Reward, 
Auction Bills, North School House. 
Warrants, 

F. Dwight, Dog Notices, 
J. E. Cutter, Wood at Auction, 
" 2 Tax Books, 



71 38 


5 00 


3 00 


2 00 


1 50 


4 00 


2 00 


1 25 


4 00 



|1,518 37 



#120 22 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 

Paid Sarah Hunt, $36 00 

Telegram. (W.H.Oliver) 1 00 

Mrs. Spencer, 
A. W. Jones, 
George E. Curtain. 
Sarah B. Chillis, 
John Whitney, 

TOWN DEBT. 
Paid Mrs. P. V. Hapgood, $400 00 $400 00 

STATE AID. 
Paul Hattie W. Wilder. 
Rebecca C. Wright, 
A. V*.. Sunnier. 
Geo. W. Sawyer. 
Joanna Moulton, 



:>9 72 




194 28 




26 00 




IT 25 




16 00 






$390 25 



$96 


00 


48 


00 


36 


00 


36 


00 


8 


. -T 



CEMETERY EXPENSES. 

Paid Martin Pike. East Cemeterv, s2T 85 

dohn Fletcher, Jr.. Do.. GT 30 

I^iahBeed. West Do., 2010!) 
F. Dwight, removing and burying 31 
bodies and boxes furnished for the 

same. 41 50 

TOWN OFFICERS. 

Paid F. P. Wood, superintending schools, $90 00 
Simon Tuttle, taking inventory and 

making taxes. 20 00 
William D. Tuttle, copying valuation 

books for the state. T 00 

Taking inventory and making taxes, 25 00 

Services as Town Clerk. 25 00 
F. Dwight, taking inventory and 

making taxes, 15 00 

J. E. Cutter, collecting taxes, 18T-5. o5 00 
James E.Billings, services as Selectman, 56 00 

Hiram J. Hapgood. do.. 45 00 

Frank H. Whitcomb. do.. 38 00 



$zii4 



W44t . L 



1365 00 



LAW SUITS. 

HENRY BROOKS AND TOWN OF ACTON. 

..aid G. A. Somerby, $500 00 

W. X. Mason, 

Witnesses, 

Jury viewing road, 

Summoning Witnesses. 

Horse hire. 

Telegrams, 

Plan of road, 

Horse hire, ear fare and 

Selectmen, 68 00 

Expenses in A. & O.W.Mead cVc Co. 

tax ease. 22 00 





150 00 




265 82 




2n 23 




U 25 




5 00 




2 36 




65 60 


services of 





INTEREST OX TOWN DEBT. 

Paid Dadid M. Handley. 
F. Rouillard, 

Phineas Puffer, 
John Goldsmith, 
Cyrus Conant, 
Luther Conant, 
[saac Heed. 
Joseph Barker. 
Patrick Farrell. 
Mrs. M. P. Hosmer, 
Jonas K. Putney. 
Josiah Dow, 
Oliver Whit comb, 
Jonathan A. Piper. 
Daniel Harris. 
Jason W- Livermore, 
Mrs. P. V. Hapgood, 
Luther Billings. 
Mrs. E. Hanscom. 
Geo. W. Gates, 
rlames E. Billings. 
Joseph Xoyes, 
Lewis Rouillard, 
H. J. Hapgood. 
Calvin Harris, 



$1,121 -•; 

)EBT. 
$210 00 


175 00 




175 00 




1«32 50 




140 00 




70 00 




84 00 




7c 00 




108 50 




70 00 




45 50 




42 00 




35 00 




42 00 




56 00 




42 00 




•)- .)•> 




- » _•) 




28 00 




47 60 




14 00 




14 00 




14 00 




13 00 




28 00 




14 00 





I. T. Flagg, *T 00 

Simon Tuttle, : » 10 

James E. Billings, 146 38 

T. F. Noyes, 28 00 

Sarah 0. Noyes, 56 00 

Charles Morris, 24 50 

Geo. II. Harris. 14 00 

John Grimes, 21 00 

I). J. Wethcrbee, 84 00 

John Wilson, 35 00 

Simon Tuttle, 42 00 



35 00 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Vid Daniel Jones, Sealing weights and 
measures, 

Mrs. Morehouse, damage to barn, 4 25 

Coal for Town Hall, 12 63 

Geo. W.Sawyer, care of Town Clock, 11 50 

Stove pipe and labor, 21 53 

29 gallons oil, 5 07 

.2 light stands. 1 00 

4 chimnics, 50 

18 lamp wicks, 20 

Opening Hall 34 times, 35 To 

Tolling bell for 15 deaths, 3 20 
Jonas Blodgett, selling wood lot and 

school house, o 00 

W. I). Tuttle, express on pub. doc. 3 56 
Services on W. Acton road, 1 50 
Description of K.C. Parker 

road, 5 00 

Dog license Blanks, 1 00 

" Stationery and postage, 2 12 
ci Journey to Sudbury, to 

make out Election returns, 3 00 

' ; Recording 45 births. 22 50 

" IT marriages. 2 55 

37 deaths, 5 TO 

W. H. Teel, damage to sleigh, 15 00 

H. J. Hapgood, express on reports, -\Q 

Telegram Blood robbery, 2 00 

-J. E. Harris, for team and dinners, 4 00 

E. Hosmcr, training school house rules, 6 00 

F. Dwight, burial straps', 3 50 



8,188 31 



J. E. Cutter, repairing building on 

Town Farm, * $1,930 00 

Discount on taxes, 828 78 

Express on three bundles, 75 

James Tuttle,for South school house, 186 11 
F.Dwight, making returns of 39 deaths, 9 7f> 
Attending funerals of 44 persons 132 00 

J. E. Billings, postage and paper, 2 00 

13,302 To 

RECEIPTS FROM FEB. 20. 1874. TO FEB. 26, 1875. 
Unexpended balance, as per report of 

Feb. 20, 1874, $6,674 07 

Appropriations and receipts. 19.993 74 

826,668 4! 

EXPENDITURES. 

Support of schools, $2,791 82 

Repairs on school houses, 48 24 

"'• *'• highways, 166 41 

Regular ^' ^ work. 2,078 25 

By order i Jounty Commissioners, 1.518 87 

Books and printing, 120 22 

Support of Poor. 390 25 

Town debt, 400 00 

State aid, 224 57 

( Vmctcrv expenses, 337 71 

Town officers, 365 00 

Law Suits. 1.121 20 

Interest on town debt, 2,18S :•>] 

Miscellaneous, 3,302 70 

State tax. 1,580 00 

County tax. 1.081 19 

_ $17.71:; 36 



Balance in Treasury, Feb. 20, 1875, $8,954 55 

TOWK DEBT. 

F. Kouillard, $2,022 50 

J. E. Billings. 214 00 

Luther Conant. 1,052 11 

J. W. Livermore, 630 00 

Charles Morris, 367 15 

Patrick FarrelL 416 17 

Phineas Puffer, 2,626 87 



Isaac Reed, $1,264 80 

febenezer Conant, 2.0(>7 66 

Joel Hanscom. 703 80 

J. K. Billings, 2,138 07 

David M. Handlcy, 3,054 25 

I. T. Flagg, 106 38 
Oliver Whitcomb, 507 58 
J. K. Putney. 693 60 
.lames A. Billings, 217 00 
[Tohn Goldsmith, 2J642 18 
Oliver W. Drew, 688 27 
Joseph Barker, 1,025 46 

II. J. Hapgood, 410 96 
Lewis Rouillard, 205 63 
Joseph Noves. 206 02 
I. A. Piper. 616 05 
Luther Billings. 21 , 84 
Simon Tuttle. 610 50 
losiah Dow. 606 53 
Patrick Farrell, 1,158 05 
John Grimes. 303 50 
Geo. Keed, 488 87 
Geo. II. Harris. 200 70 
John Wilson, 500 00 
Geo. W. Gates, 212 75 
Daniel Harris. 822 40 
fearali C. Noyes, '800 00 
Thomas F. Noyes, 400 00 
Mrs. M. P. Hosmcr, 1,000 00 
D. J. Wetherbee, 1,241 00 
Calvin Harris, 208 08 



133,181 78 



Amount due from State aid, 268 00 

Estimated value of old school House, 000 00 

Due from Town Treasurer, 8,954 iji) 



$9,822 



Balance against the town. $23,359 28 

JAMES E. BILLINGS, ) Selectmen 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD, } of 

FRANK II. WHITCOMB, ) Acton. 

Acton, Feb. 26, 1874. 



10 



REPORT OF THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

AT THE ALMSHOUSE IN ACTON, 
For the year ending April 1st, 1875. 



Articles 


on hand April 1st, 1875. 




] horse. 


$150 00 


814 lbs. -Hour, 


So 0: 


11 cows, 


097 00 


5 lbs. tea, 


5 0C 


8 J tons hay. 


170 00 


10 lbs. dried apple, 


1 '2i 


1 shoat, 


18 00 


41 hens, 


30 7," 


11- tons shorts, 


15 00 


7 turkeys, 


9jOC 


2 bush, corn, 


2 00 


GO lbs. codfish, 


2 J 1C 


100 lbs cott:>n seed meal, 


2 00 


25 lbs. fresh pork, 


3 12 


5 bbls. apples, 


5 00 


1 gallon molasses, 


G5 


67 bush, potatoes, 


:):) 25 


34 flour bbls.. 


5 (17 


80 lbs. ham, 
80 lbs. pork, 


10 00 
1 2 00 








si. 209 01 


4 gallons pickles, 


2 00 


Ashes on hand, 


3 in 


4 gallons soap, 


80 








10 lbs. lard, 


1 80! 
Receipts. 


sl.212 01 


Milk, 


S9G9 6G 


Hog, 


IS J 


Apples, 


391 06 


Rigging, 


ID 00 


Berries, 


14 33 


Window, 


GO 


Poultry, 


:U 59 


Old brick, 


1) 00 


Calves, 


182 18 


Grease, 


1 1 


Cows, 
E ggs* 


316 50 






11 20 




SI. 971 £ 


Potatoes, 


1 7 90 







1 1 



Flour, 

Tools, 

Barrels, 

Matches, 

Curtains and fixtures, 

Filing saws, 

Corn and Meal, 

Plaster, 

Bristol Brick, 

Hay Rigging, 

Express Wagon, 

Wheelbarrow. 

Harness, 

Drag, 

Cloth and Clothing, 

Crackers, 

Spices, 

Molasses, 

Butter, 

Cheese, 

Sugar, 

Tea, 

Tobacco, 

Cream Tartar, 

Raisins, 

Nails, 

Medicine, 

Sulphur, 

Saltpetre, 

Salt, 

Soap, 

Cows, 

Saleratus, 

Washing Soda, 

Candles, 

Beans, 

Use of Bull, 

Grass Seeds, 

Pails. 

Rice, 

Corn Starch, 

Chalk, 

Newspaper, 

Fish, 

Blacksmith bill. 



lAIH'IIM'S, 



$77 25 

14 99 

44 72 

1 20 

5 07 

1 15 

595 48 

48 

10 

G5 00 

46 25 

5 20 

31 25 



Lard, 

Meat, 

Oil, 

Dr. H. Cowdrey's bill. 

Razor, 

Ropes, 

Clothes Pins, 

Dried Apple, 



$11 54 
114 00 

2 82 



Clei 



an in; 



Clock, 



Twine, 

Cabbage and Tomato pi 

Wicking, 

Blueing, 



ant 



4 00 [Netting, 
17 27;Onions, 

13 91 [Condition powders, 

3 1] Yeast cakes, 
10 00 Hay, 

74 34j Sweet potatoes, 
17 09! Rosin, 
33 23 1 Kettle, 
13 6G; Brooms, 
9 17JMop handle, 

5 02 1 Shoes, 

1 IGJBox grease, 

91 1 Butter tub, 
7 10 : Oyster shells, 

60j Lantern, 

3GjVinesrar and barrel, 

4 89 i Crockery, 
13 02 Bag, 

794 OOjHogshead, 

1 58 Stationery, 

L 21 (Table covers, 

I 20 Hemp carpet, 

9 02 Sled, 

4 ()0|Expenses marketing. 
Bedding. 
Labor, 
Furniture, 
Renovating beds. 
Pasturing cow, 



2 45 
! 75 

82 

40 

12 

■2 70 

13 84 

X 83 



■j zo 
75 

1 24 
12 

5 82 
75 
10 
50 
08 
24 
2,i 



1 00 


31 73 


1 10 


19 


50 


I 24 


30 


3 25 


20 


15 


20 


1 12 


4 57 


1 is 


35 


75 


50 


2 12 


2 24 


15 00 


73 


9 08 


J ^ 87 


27 45 


20 00 


<; oo 



2,405 42 



1 - 



Lockup Furniture. 





25 




25 




38 


$ 


30 00 




10 50 




2 20 



Plates, 

Knives and Forks, 
I- Doz. Chairs, 
Stove Pipe, 



SI 10 
1 37 
3 00 

1 7G 



Pail, 

Dipper. 

Wash Bowl, 

I Doz. Mattresses, 

Bedding, 

Mugs, 

General Expenses, 

Lockup Expenses. 
Services of Asapli Parliti, 

'■ J. E. Cutter as Overseer of poor 

'• John Conantj 

" Klisha II. Cutler, 

Total amount of Expenditures, 
" " Receipts, 

Drawn from treasury to balance, 
Fnterest on Farm. 

Victualing 410 Travellers, 
Carpenters Board, 



Cost of supporting poor on the Farm, $888 83 

Whole number of persons exclusive of travellers supported in Alms- 
house, five; average number, three and three fourths; present number 

live. 

JOHN E. CUTTER, ) Overseers 

JOHN CONANT, of 







$50 81 


$2,405 


47 




50 81 




100 


00 




35 


00 




13 


00 




ir> 


00 








$2920 2:5 






1974 53 


$945 


70 




240 


00 


si is;, 70 


$205 


00 


91 


87 


$296 87 







KLISHA IT. CUTLER, \ 



Acton, April 1st, 1875. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT FOR 1874, 



KiB'gBts in Acton in IW7-I. 

Date of Birth. .Name of Child. Parents' Xauacs. 

Feb. 1, Irving Elma Smith, son of Alien G. and Oeorgiana Smith. 
" 20, Sumner Merle Teele, son of Wm. H. and MaryE. Teele. 
" 22, Jerry Bradley, son of Dennis and Hannah Bradley. 
March 10, Walter Franklin Randall, «m of John W. and Sophia A. 
Randall. 
" 18, .Joseph Lloyd Morris, son of Richard and Ann Morris. 

20, Mabel Emma Abbott, daughter of John W. and Mary Abbott. 
20, William Cooper, son of Levi and Annie Cooper. 
April 12, Grace Gertrude Knowlton, daughter of George W. and Angie 

H_ Knowlton. 
June 9, Ernest Morton Littlefield, son of Nahum and M. Addie Little- 
field. 
" 18, Edward Mollis Robinson, son of Charles and Persia V. Robin 

son. 
" 22. Mary Louisa Calder, daughter of Thomas and Maria Calder. 
July 7, Forrest Eli Pickens, son of Oilman F. and Ahneda A. Pickens. 

" 15, Richard Morris Davis, son of John and Elizabeth Davis. 
Aug. 8, a son to Carrie A. Gardner. 
" 11, Louis Augustine James .Foley, son of Patrick and Elizabeth 

M. Foley. 
•• 17, Daniel Herbert Trainor, son of Hugh and Hannah Trainor. 
•• 20, Albert Raymond Clinic son of Neil and Mary Elizabeth Currie. 
" 28, Elma Gertrude Stone, daughter of Charles B. and Marietta C. 
Stone. 
Sept. 2, Oscar AMu Nelson, son of Oscar and Mary Ann Nelson. 
•• 7, Martha Mary Morris, daughter James and Margaret Morris. 
" 8, Addie Louise Guilford, daughter of Samuel A. and Nellie M. 

Guilford. 
" 0, Lizzie Agnes Manion, daughter of Thomas and Mary A. Manion. 
" 10, Lulu Mary Lawrence, daughter of James R. and Abbie F. 

Lawrence. 
" 14, John Edward O'Neil, son of Patrick and Hannah O'Neil. 
•• 19, Michael Edward Ryan, sen of John and Catharine Ryan. 
" 2:5, Olive Genevra Barker, daughter of Henry and Louisa M. 

Barker. 
" 2:5. Harvey Putnam Tuttle, son of Abram and Martha A Tuttle. 
(Jet. 1, Parley Walcott Richardson, son of Henry W. and M. Hattie 
Richardson. 
" 0, George Irving Harris, son of Geo. H. and Angenette Harris. 
" 7, Willie Edward Tuttle, son of Horace 2d and Arethusa M. Tuttle. 
" 7, Bernard Ains worth Preston. *on of Herbert E. and Sophia E. 
Preston. i 



14 

32. Oct. 14, Frederic Wm, Wilson, son of Robert and Mary Ann Wilson. 

83. " 22, Allen Brooks Parker, son of Edwin 0. and Hannah H. Parker. 

:54. " 24, Fred Linwood Robbins, son of Elbridge J. and Ellen M. Bob- 
bins. 

."-"). •' 27, Thomas Albert Voysey Rhodes, son of Win. H.. and Mary 
Jane Rhodes. 

36. Nov. L, Albertha May Greer, daughter of William J. and Elizabeth 

Greer. 

37. '" 11, James Bockwood Dunn, son of Waldo G. and Fannie M. Dunn. 

38. V 18, Sarah L. Jones, daughter of Lowell A. and Sarah A. Jones. 
89. " 17, Charles Leon Decoster, son of Geo. II. and Lucy A. Decoster. 

40. " 80, Carrie May Gilmore, daughter of Walter A. and Emma A. 

Gilmore. 

41. Dec. 13, Albert Brooks But teriield, son of Francis and Annie Maria 

Butterfield. 

42. •' 17, Evie Blanche Fletcher, daughter (if Aaron S. and Sarah T. 

Fletcher. 
4:;. •• 21, Hugh Henry Coulter, son of Hugh and Matilda Coulter. 
44. ■• 24, Emma Jane Hart, daughter of Arthur A. and Harriet P. Hart. 
1873. May 14, Guy El wood Carrie, son of Neil and Mary Elizabeth Currie. 
1872. Sept. 15, Anna Calista Parker, daughter of Edwin G. and Hannah II. 

Parker. 



Marriages Rc?c»a'c1c?<1 aba Acton in 1ST J. 

Bate of Marriage. Names of Parties. 

1. Jan. 1, .Stephen K. Corliss and Miss Hannah D.Wooster, both of Acton. 

2. '• 15, Mr. Moses E. Taylor and Miss Clara Tuttle, both of Acton. 

8. '• 15, Mr. Samuel P. Brackett, of Stow, and Miss Clara. A. Chaffin, 
of Acton. 

4. •• Mr. Henry C. Jones, of Boston, and Miss Lydia A. Sawyer, of 

Maynard. 

5. Feb. 28, Mr. Levi B. Gould, of Wilton. Me., and Miss Mary P. Abbott, 

of Carlisle. 
('». April 1, Mr. Lyman C. Taylor and Miss Addie Tuttle. both of Acton. 
7. ' ; ."), Mr. James I. Mills and Miss Mary M. .loncs, both of Acton. 
S. ••' 12, Mr. John Byam, of Chelmsford, and Miss Marietta Eouillard, 

of Acton. 
0. '• 12, Mr. Charles Waldo Eanscom and Miss Susie L. Freeman, both 

of Acton. 

10. May 18, Mr. Henry H. Hanscom, of Acton, and Miss Josephine Tuttle. 

of Sterling. 

11. June 20. Mr. Levi W. Stevens and Miss Annie E. Hall, both of Acton. 

12. Oct. 17, Mr. John W. Heald, of Carlisle, and Miss Mary A. Parker, of 

Westford. 
18. Nov. 19, Mr. Jason S. Brown and Miss Ellen O. Huntley, both of 
Lowell. 

14. " 2.'*, Mr. Geo. W. Rand, Jr., and Miss Sarah E. Ingham, both of 

Concord. 

15. " 2»>, Mr. George Pouillard and Miss Emma Rettie Dunnells, botb 

of Acton. 
1(5. Dee. 16, Mr. J. Treseott Dinsmore, of Framingham, and Miss Esther A. 

Hapgood, of Acton. 
17. " 20, Mr. James A. Symonds, of Acton, and Miss Flora C. Harlow.. 
» of Lowell. 



Desitli* iu Acloai in IH7 1. 

No. Date of Death. Name and Age. 

1. Jan. I". Miss Nellie S. Wilder, aged 15 years, (1 months, 16 days. 

2. •• 10, Miss Carrie W. Faulkner, aged 38 years, 16 days. 

:J. •• 20, Mr. John F. Blood, aged 61 years, 3 months, 8 days. 
4. •' 28, Mr. Silas Taylor, aged SO years, 7 months, 1 day. 
:>. Feb. 0, II. Gertrude Withington, aged 11 years, 5 months, 18 day*. 
1$. •■ 10, Mr. Nathaniel Hapgood, aged 89 years, 11 months. 
7. March I, Nathan H. Stone, '.aged 35 years, 4 months, 25 day-. 
6. •* 0, Miss Ida R. Estabrook, aged 19 years. 24 days. 
'.». •• 15, Mrs. Fannie R. Wheeler, wife of James W. Wheeler, aged 

60 years, 2 months, 10 days. 
10. •• L5>, Irving *W. Flagg, son of Isaac W. and Emma Flagg, aged 1 

year, •") months, 2 days. 
I!. April 7, Mrs. Betsey O. Sawyer, wife of George W.Sawyer, aged 53 

years, •') month-, 23 days. 

12. •■ T. -Mrs. Hannah W. Mace, aged 7:) years. 

13. •• I:;. William, eon of Levi and Annie Cooper, aged 18 days. 

14. •• 24, Mr. Richard Morris, aged 24 years, 5 months. 

15. May 1. Mrs. Susanna L. Spencer, aged 82 years, 8 months, 18 days. 
Id. ■• 4, Miss Harriet J. Reed, aged 35 years, 6 months, -l days. 

IT. •• 4. Mr>. Joanna Moulton, widow of Mr. Richard Moulton, aged 

i')4 years, 17 day-. 
is. •• 4. Mary Augusta Davis, daughter of Wm. 15. and S. Maria Davis, 

aged 4 years, 4 months. 12 days. 
ID. June 24. Mr. Jonathan Strong, aged 7!! years, 11 month-. 15 days. 
■). July:), .\lrs, Eliza Kinsley, wife of Mr. Richard Kinsley, aged 48 

years. 

21. •• 2S, Mrs. Elizabeth D. Blatichard, wife of Mr. Simon Blanchard, 

aged 63 years. 

22. .'vug. 5. Mr. Oeorge Bobbins, aged 90 years. 

2:!. Aug. :',[), Mrs. Ann F. Chaffin, wife of Mr. Samuel Chaffin, aged 66 

years. 
24. Sept. 4. Emory S. Preston, son of Herbert E. and Emma S. Preston. 

aged 1 year. '■) months, 4 days. 
2."i. •• 10, Mr. John I). Whitney, aged 70 years. 7 months, 5 day-. 
2(5. •• 11. Mrs. Eunice Weston, widow of Stephen Weston, aged 82 

year-. 2 months, 25 day-. 
27. " 24. Grace Evelyn Bobbins, daughter of Elbridge J. and Ellen M. 

Bobbins, aged 1 year. 11 month-. 
2s. '• 24. Mrs. Lydia A. Farrar, wife of Mr. Henry Farrar, aged 38 

years, 6 months. 
2!t. Oct.. s. Mrs. Anna E. Stevens, wife of Mr. Levi W. Stevens, aged 

36 years, 3 months, 20 days. 

30. •' I'*, Mrs. ILinuah Wright, wife of Mr. AMmon Wright, aged 77 

years, 9 month-. 

31. Nov. t;. Leander Y. X. Tuttle, son of Luke and S. Sophia Tutlle, aged 

2 years. 7 months, 23 days. 

32. •• 2(». Sarah L., daughter of Lowell A. and Sarah A. Jones, aged 

2 days. 

33. D('-. :;. Mr. Frank F. Hay ward, aged 22 years, 7 months. 13 days. 
'■'A. " 4. Mr. Josiah C. Mason, aged 54 years. 4 months. 

'■>'>. " 15, Mrs. Eleanor Phelan, aged 51 years, 7 months. 

36. •' 21. Mr. Simon Hapgood, aged SO years, 11 months. 21 days. 

17. •• 2"J. Mrs. Mary J. Palmer, aged -"It; years. 1 month. 1") days. 



16 



Barnes of Persons having Dogs Licensed in 1974. 



r/ 



Name of Owner. 


No. 


Name oi' Owner. 


y<j- 


Francis Hosmer, 


1. 


I). H. Farrar, 


1. 


■John Conant, 


1. 


J. W. Abbott, 


1. 


Willie F. Richardson, 


1. 


W. W. Wooster. 


1. 


Silas Conant, Jr. 


1. 


Francis Pratt, 


i. 


Elnathan Jones, 


1. 


Henry Shaplev, 


1. 


Varnum Tuttle, 


1. 


E. D. Lothrop, 


1. 


Tiittles, Jones & Wetherbee, 3- 


A. Bulette, 


1. 


H. Waldo Tuttle. 


1. 


Lewis Beck, 


2. 


Thos. P. Yarter, 


1. 


J. Fletcher & Sons., 


1. 


I ieorge Conant, 


1. 


X. C. Peed, 


1. 


George V. Mead, 


1. 


J. R. Baesett, 


1. 


Alfred Sawyer, 


1. 


L. R. Forbush, 


1. 


A. & 0. W. Mead. 


1. 


J. E. Harris, 


1. 


Geo. C. Wright, 


1. 


Edwin Tarbell, 


1. 


Luther Conant, 


1. 


J. E. Reed, 


1. 


A. B. Brown, 


1. 


Joseph Reed. 


1. 


Elwvn II. Whitcomb, 


1. 


Daniel Tuttle, 


1 


S. M. Osgood & Co., 


1. 


Francis Robbins, 


i. 


Levi Houghton, 


1. 


Allen Smith, 


1. 


O. E. Preston, 


1. 


Frank Houghton. 


1. 


W. A. Gil more, 


1. 


S. Taylor Fletcher, 


1. 


Horace Tuttle, 


1. 


Theo. Karcher, 


i. 


W. II. Faulkner, 


1. 


John Daley, 


fern., 1. 


Willard A. Davis, 


I. 


U. A. Snell, 


l'cm., 1. 


Taylor Bros., 


1. 


Chas. Morris, 


j • 


Henry Potter, 


1. 


John Grimes, 


1. 


Moses Taylor. 


1. 


D. C. Cutler, 


1. 


E. F. Fuller, ' 


1. 


H. A. Barker, 


1. 


Augustus Fletcher, 


1. 


J. W. Randall, 


1. 


J. C. Keyes, 


1. 


Chas. Wheeler, 


1. 


I). J. Wetherbee, 


I. 


J. W. Charter, 


1. 


Daniel Wetherbee. 


1. 


E. Robbins, 


1. 


Isaac W. Flagg, 


1. 


Calvin Harris, 


1. 


Daniel Harris, 


1. 


J. A. Piper, 


J. 


Geo. E. Priest, 


1. 


Robert Fiske, 


1. 


A. S. Fletcher, 


1. 


Geo. W. Livermore, 


tern. 1. 


A. J. Fletcher, 


1. 


Martin Whitney, 


1. 


A. C. Haudley, 


i # 


D. H. Knights, 


1. 


Frank Marshall, 


1. 


A. L. Tuttle, 


I. 


Geo. C. Conant, 


1. 


Henry Haynes, 


1. 


Horace Tuttle, 2d., 


1. 


Josiah Piper, 


1. 


-J, R. Daniels, 


1 


W. E. Wood, 


1. 


E. J. Robbins, fern., 


L 


Henry Smith, 


1. 


L. N. Fletcher, 


1.. 


Neil Carrie, 


1. 


Total, 


1 
84 mal«s 


4 females. 





# 



9 / 



THE ANNUAL REPORT 



CHOOL COMMITTEE 



TOWN OF ACTON, 



FOR THE 



SCHOOL YEAR 1874-5, 



ACTON : 

ACTON PATRIOT .TOR PRINT. 

1 8 7 5. 



REPORT. 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

In accordance with the requirements of the statutes and a t me 
honored custom your School Committee, having discharged their du- 
ties to the best of their ability, beg leave to submit, for your consider- 
ation, the following report : — 

We trust that we have been fully impressed with the importance of 
the charge committed to our care, and have labored very earnestly to 
keep up and, if possible, improve the standard of excellence in our 
schools. But in looking over the school history of the past year it 
seems to us that we have been called to encounter even more than 
the usual number of obstacles. 

During the past year we have been obliged to make several changes 
in our corps of teachers, and, though we have been very fortunate in 
our selections, as a general thing, every teacher has to gain some 
experience in any school in order to secure the highest degree of suc- 
cess. We consider it very important to the best interests of our 
schools to continue a good teacher several consecutive terms in the 
same school. 

Moreover, during the past school year our schools have been more 
broken up by sickness than is usually the case. This has been espe- 
cially true of the schools during the past Winter. On account of the 
prevalence of the scarlet fever and other forms of disease three of the 
large schools closed in the midst of the term, so tint a large number 
of onr scholars have suffered a very serious loss of school advantages. 
But, while this is a fact to be regretted, we feel that our oratitude is 
due to an overruling Providence who has averted from us the calam- 
ity of a general epidemic which might have proved fatal to many 
children whose faces will brighten our school rooms in coming terms. 
It is sad for us to feel that, as it is, the presence of some scholars will 
be missed, and we sympathize very deeply with their afflicted [homes. 



During the past year we have had one public examination in all 
the schools, and two in those schools which were not terminated or 
greatly disturbed by sickness. These examinations have been well 
attended, and, as a general thing, highly creditable to the educational 
work of the town. We are more and more convinced that these 
public examinations are excellent, both lor teachers and scholars, and 
'we think it may be well to have them more frequently in the future 
than in the past. We have been pleased to notice the evident interest 
taken in the schools by the people of the several districts during the 
past year, as evidenced by the large attendance upon several of the 
public examinations. We think, too, that the people have been very 
careful and just in their criticisms, and thus have done much to aid 
both teachers and committee in their efforts to promote the interest of 
the schools. We hope that a similar course may be pursued in the 
future, so that, as during the past year, all will work together for the 
success of this highly important work. 

The success of the schools dining the past year has been affected by 
causes beyond our control, but the past year's experience has suggest- 
ed to us certain points where it may be possible for us, as a town, to 
secure better conditions of success in the future, and it is that the 
citizens of the town generally may view the matter from our stand- 
point that we make suggestions with reference to the following points. 

Town Appropriation tor Schools. 

We are aware that it is necessary for the town to raise large sums 
of money for other purposes, and it is with diffidence that we put 
forward the claim of our schools ; but we feel that we should not be 
faithful to our charge unless we mad' known their real wants. Good 
teachers command as high wages now as they did five years ago, and 
the expense; of heaving and caring for our school houses is so much 
greater now than when the old school houses were used that there 
are not sufficient funds for school terms of suitable length, even with 
the addition which has been already made to the town appropriation 
for these purposes. The vacations of school are now too long for the 
best good of the scholars. The vacations are so long that they go far 
towards dissipating the impressions made upon the scholars' minds 
during the sessions of school, and the school houses are so comforta- 
ble and huge that it would be far better, both for the health and the 
morals of our scholars, to spend more weeks in the school-room and 



less iii the stores and streets. The possibility of a large number of 
school weeks during the year will enable us more easily to retain the 
services of good teachers, at the same cost per month, as it will in- 
crease their yearly income, and employ their time when otherwise 
they would be obliged to be unemployed. An additional appropria- 
tion of two hundred and fifty dollars would be very useful in pro- 
moting the good of our schools and we hope that our citizens may 
see their way clear to increase their appropriation that amount. 

Importance off Every Verm of School to Scholars. 

One very serious obstacles in the way of the satisfactory progress 
of many of our scholars is the fact that they are uniformly absent from 
school one term or more every year. The usual excuse for the ab- 
sence of these scholars is the supposed need of their work at home. 
In some cases it is no doubt the fact, that there is an apparent need of 
the sacrifice of a higher for a lower advantage, but we believe it to be 
usually the case that if the parents duly appreciated the importance of 
a thorough education, as the best inheritance which they can bestow 
upon their children — if they realized the need of this as their children 
will realize it in coming years — we feel very sure chat they would so 
arrange it that their scholars should not be detained from school by 
work a term or a day. 

A child of twelve or fourteen years of age can do but little manual 
labor, consistently with his health and the development of a strong con- 
stitution, while he can gain as much real advantage from study at that 
time as at the age of eighteen, hence it is very poor economy to keep 
scholars of such an age from school. It may be that the terms can be 
arranged to better accommodate the scholars which are usually kept 
at home for the above reason by bringing a large number of weeks of 
school into the time intervening between Nov. 1st and April or May 
lst. As it is, the evil complained of is to be lamented, and is appar- 
ently increasing in some localities. 

IflaSe or Fesaiale Teachers. 

The question has been asked several times during the past year, 
would not male teachers conduct our large winter schools to better ad- 
vantage than female teachers ? To this question we have uniformly 
given a negative answer, for these reasons : 

1st. To employ male teachers we would be obliged to shorten our 
winter terms, which are now too short nearly one-third, or shorten the 



other terras enough to make out the extra money required for the 
employment of a male teacher. 

2nd. It is very difficult to rind good male teachers that are willing 
to take charge of our common schools. Permanent situations are 
open to such teachers in a higher grade of schools. The male teach- 
ers who usually apply for our schools are students in search of a little 
experience in teaching, and a little money for the further prosecution 
of their studies, and more frequently than otherwise secure both at the 
expense of their scholars. 

3d. It is very important that we should be able to secure good 
teachers several consecutive terms, but. if we get into the way of em- 
ploying male teachers in the winter, it will be very sure to result in a 
change of teachers in these schools twice in a year and the best teach- 
ers will seek situations where they can hope for steady employment, 
so that, as it seems to us. the good of the schools will be imperiled 
throughout the year. 

As to the management of unruly scholars, we believe that a female 
teacher, experienced in the control of scholars, will succeed far better 
than a male teacher without any such experience; the former teacher may 
or may not have as much physical strength as the latter; that, as we 
look upon it, makes little difference. The brute force as the princi- 
pal factor in the government of schools is out of date. It is now 
generally understood that the same forces should control scholars in 
school which will control them in society, viz., a due regard for right- 
ful authority and the dignity of law, as such, and, when advanced 
scholars can not be controlled by the>e means, it seems to us that they 
ought to be turned over to their parents for punishment or dismissed 
from school. 

Text Books. 

During the past year we have nearly completed the change in Read- 
ing books which was recommended in our last report. The good re- 
sults of the change have more than equalled our expectations. To 
make the series of Headers uniform, it is necessary that the 6th Readers 
should be changed in two of the largest schools. Beyond this we 
would recommend no change in text books the coming year. 

Primary Schools. 

These schools have been as successful during the past year as at any 
previous time, so far as we have been able to discover. But we have 



thought it possible that Object Teaching may be employed more largely 
in this grade of school than heretofore. This method of teaching is 
now very largely employed by educators in the instruction of young 
scholars, with excellent results. This method is now employed by 
most of our teachers to some extent, and it may be that there is room 
for still further improvement in the same direction. In one of our 
schools it has been the practice to dismiss the younger scholars earlier 
than the regular time, and, so iar as we know, the practice has not been 
attended with any bad results. It may be that fewer hours of confine- 
ment to the school rooms will be better for our younger scholars gen- 
erally. 

These, Fellow Citizens, are some of the suggestions which we would 
present to you for the improvement ol our schools. In order 
these suggestions may be carried out, your approval and co-oporati'on 
are necessary to a greater or less extent, and we hope that neither 
will be withheld- Our most valuable possessions, as a town, are our 
children, and the most important interest we arc called to provide 'for is 
to be found in our schools. We trust that they will receive at your 
hands the care and support which are their due. 

Passing from a consideration of the condition and wants of our 
school system, taken as a whole, we would now invite you to a brief 
review of the different schools. T ,Ve will consider the schools in the 
order determined by the attendance of scholars in each district, men- 
tioning first the schools in the districts having the largest attend- 
ance. 



This school had tiie same teacher throughout the yea-. Miss M. A. 
Edwards. Miss E. is a teacher of ripe experience, is dignified in her 
bearing as a teacher, and has other elements essential to success in 
the government of a school ; and in this school ought to have had 
the highest degree of success. As it was,we think the highest usefulness 
of the school was somewhat impaired by the conduct of a very few 
scholars, to whom some previous remarks in this report fitly apply. 
On account of sickness there was no public examination in the Winter 
term. The examination at the close of the fall term was very satis- 
factory, as much so, on the whole, as any that we have attended in 
this school. 



South PA*flimary. 

This school, also, had the same teacher, Miss S. L. Burr, through 
out the year. Miss B. made herself at home in the school-room and 
manifested a good degree of skill in the difficult work of interesting 

and instructing young scholars. She seemed to possess the respect 
and love of her pupils to a marked degree. The examination at 
the close of the Fall term, proved that the scholars had made good 
progress during the term. The school was terminated so suddenly in 
the winter that there was no examination. From what we are able 
to learn, Miss B.'s work m the school was creditable to her ability as 
a teacher and satisfactory to the Committee. 

West 4xTC&isimai*. 

This school had the same teacher through the whole year, Miss A. 
Ii. Allen. Miss A. taught this school the last term of last year, and 
was referred to as a teacher in our last report, so that no mention oi- 
lier qualities is called for in this place We will simply say that 
Miss A.*s work in this school, during the past year, has but confirmed 
us in our impression of Her fitness _for the work of teaching. Not 
only has this school made excellent progress in knowledge, but, so 
far as we know, there has been a most harmonious state of feeling 
between teacher and scholars, which promises much for the success of 
t'ni.^school in the future. Thecxaminacion at the end of the Fall term 
was highly creditable to teacher and scholars. The Winter term was 
so broken up by .sickness that there was no public examination: but 
the Committee took the opportunity to make a private examination into 
the progress of the school and satisfied themselves that it was as good' 
as they reasonably could expect, under the circumstances. 

*Test Primal 1 }'. 

The Spring term of this school was taught by Miss A. E. Hall, 
whose name, as a teacher,has appeared in several reports of this Com- 
mittee, and always associated with words of praise. Miss H.'s work 
this term was fully equal to that of any other term. Her whole 
heart was in her work, and she found her reward in the highest de- 
gree of success and in tiie most grateful love of her pupils, who. no 
doubt, will cherish her memory always. 

The Fall and Winter terms were taught by Miss A. O. Hopkins- 
a teacher of ripe experience, who proved herself well adapted to the 
work devoted to her care. As a teacher, she is well versed in expe- 



clients for exciting the thought and holding the attention of young 
scholars. On account of the apparent danger of the scarlet fever 
this school ended in the midst of the Winter term, so that it had but 
one public examination during the year, the one at the end of the 
Fall term, which was quite satisfactory. 

Center Grammar. 

The Spring and Fall terms of this school were taught by Miss J. 
S. Ixirtlett, the teacher who taught the school during the whole of 
last year, and who was noticed fully in our last report. We will 
simply say that the school during these terms was very small — almost 
unaccountably so — but that the scholars who attended the school 
made good advancement in real mental discipline. 

The Winter term was taught by Mr. C. P. Searle of Amherst Col- 
Mr. Searle was well recommended to the Committee, as a 
scholar and a gentleman, and so far as we know possessed these qual- 
ities, but was without experience in the management of a public 
school and failed to exhibit any natural talent for such a work. It 
should be said, however, that the school was the largest and consisted 
of the oldest scholars of any in our town, and would have been a dif- 
ficult school for even an experienced teacher. The Committee would 
have secured an experienced female teacher for the school had he 
found it possible for him to do so and gratify the manifest wishes of 
the majority of the scholars and people of the district. When their 
desires became known to him, it was so near the time for the school 
to begin that it was impossible for him to do otherwise than he did. 
It should be said in justice to the scholars that they generally did their 
utmost to save the school from being a tailure, and that, on the whole. 
considering everything, it had a fair decree of success. 

Center Primary. 

This school was favored with the continued instruction of Miss A. 
K. Tucker, who was mentioned m our last report in such terms of 
praise that nothing need be said of her here. This school also was termi- 
nated in the midst of the term by sickness. Like the Grammar School 
ir was one of the largest in town, but until it was broken up was 
making excellent progress and promised to be one of the most suc- 
cessful schools in town. 



10 

Kast School. 

This school enjoyed the labors of the same teacher, Miss M. C. 
Harriss, through the whole year. Miss II. has had an extended expe- 
rience, as a teacher in a high order of schools, and applied herseif 
most heartily to the work of this school and produced a marked im- 
pression upon all the scholars who attended the school each term. The 
examinations, at the end of the Fall and Winter terms, were very sat- 
isfactory — among the best that we have attended. We considered the 
progress made in Reading especially commendable. 

Southeast School. 
The Spring and Fail terms of this school were taught by Miss E. O. 
Clark. Miss C. was mentioned in our last report in connection with 
this school, in terms of commendation. We think that she did as well 
with the school as any teacher could do. The Winter term was taught 
by Miss E. S< Brooks. Miss B. has had but little experience in teach- 
ing, but devoted herself to the work of the school with considerable 
energy, and we hoped that the examination at the end of the term 
would prove that she had secured a good degree of success. We are 
sorry to say, however, that the examination was not very satisfac- 
tory, though it may have been as good as we ought to have expected, 
considering the unambitious character of the scholars. 

North School. 

The Spring and Fall terms of this school were taught by Miss L. L. 
Keyes, a resident of the district. Miss K. taught in the East Shoo 1 . 
one term last year and was noticed in our last report. She seemed to 
have the good will and co-operation of her scholars, and, so far as we 
know, did her work to the satisfaction of all interested in the school. 

The Winter term was taught by Miss^E. F. Reed, who has been 
mentioned in previous rej)orts in connection with this school. We will 
simply say that we considered this one of her most successful schools. 

As appears from the above review, the proportion of schools that 
have had the same teacher through the whole year is very large, and 
the success of the schools has been greatly promoted by this fact. 

Appended are the usual Statistical Reports, which we commend to 
your careful perusal. In the number of visits, those made by the Su- 
perintendent or by friends at the public examinations, are not included. 



il 



It is possible that some mistakes may have been made hi the Roll of 
Honor, as we had to gather the names, in almost every case, from the 
school register, which fact exposed ns to the liability of mistakes. We 
hope, however, that all is correct, 

Respectfully submitted. 

HARRIS COWDREY, (Chairman), ] 
ELBRIDGE J. ROBBINS, (Clerk), 
JAMES TUTTLE, 
GEORGE HARRISS, 
JOSEPH NOTES, 
JOHN FLETCHER, 2d, 

F. P. WOOD. Superintendent of Schools. 



School Con 
Act 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Several scholars in the different schools have been absent or tardy only 
once, and several have not been tardy or absent after they began to go to 



school, but did not go when the school began, 
such, but cannot by our rules. 



We woud gladly mention 



Those who have not 
been absent or tardy 
for one term. 



Those who have not 
been absent or tardy 
for two terms. 



Those who have not 
been absent or tardy 
for three terms. 



M. Louisa Burr. 
Annie E. Jordan, 
Edith Lewis, 
Jesse Mitchell, 
Hattie Wetherbee, 
Frank Bulette, 
Frank Harris. 
George Haynes, 
Arthur Jones, 
Charles Lewis, 
Wiliie S. Warren. 



South Gbammae 

Lucy A. Jones, 
Etta C. Temple, 
Mary V. Phelan, 
Jimmie Hannon, 
Michael Hannon. 



Gertie Clark, 
Florence Fletcher. 
Josie Hannon, 
Carrie Hay ward, 
Carrie Shapley, 
Delia Wetherbee, 
Fred. Brown, 
Fred. Farrar, 
Harry Fletcher, 
Arlie Jackson, 
John Lynch, 
Charles Priest, 
Charlie Worcester, 



Annie Blanch ard, 
Lottie Handley, 
Ella Teele, 
Nellie White, 
Eftie Wright, 
Ellsworth Hapgoodj 
George Hutchins, 
Willie Kelley, 
George Bobinson. 
Warren Stevens. 



South Pbimaby. 

Mary Haggerty, 
Emily Hannon, 
Mary Jackson, 
Mary Knight, 
Eda Shapley, 
Edith Snell. 



Eva Shapley. 



West Geammae. 



Clara Tattle. 
Edgar Hall, 
Freddie Mead, 
George Mead, 



Mary Tuttle, 
Inez Wyinan, 
Arthur Bradford. 
Charlie Hopkins, 
Alphonso Wyinan 



13 



West Primary. 



Charlie W. Foye, 
Georgie D. Foye, 
Walter Gardner, 
Elmer E. Handley, 
Milly G. Handley, 
Freddy G. Holden, 
Charles H. Morris, 
Charles B. Parker, 
Clesson J. Parker, 
Everett A. Richardson, 
Warren Taylor, 
Frank A. Teele. 



Ana Davis, 
Alma Forbush, 
Annie Hammond. 
Carrie Jones, 
Simon Taylor. 



Lizzie Cummins 
A.rvilla Darling, 
Erminie Davis, 
"Bertha Fiske, 
Addie Pike, 
Etta Tuttle, 
Florian Eiske, 
Frank Fiske. 



Abbie Fiske, 
Bertha E. Hosmer, 
Nixon Ball, 
Carlton C. Conant, 
ElbridgeR. Conant, 
•George H. Bobbins, 
Frank E. Wetherbee, 
Roland J. Wetherbee. 



Mary A. Blanchard, 
Minnie B. Hart, 
Ida J. Tuttle, 
Bertie S. Wright, 
Fred W. Gilmore, 
Willie P. Hart, 
David Kingsley. 



Hattie A. Parker, 
Arthur F. Blanchard, 
Allie H. Gilmore, 
Herbert Hapgood. 
Bertie F. Mead. 



Centre Gkammak. 



Horace Tuttle, 
Gillie Parlin. 



C E XTR E P K IM AR Y. 



Carrie Dunn. 



East School; 



Bessie M. Ball, 
Hattie R. Esterbrook, 
Mary D. Farrar, 
Florence B. Perkins, 
Frank H. Billings, 
Webster C. Bobbins. 



Susie A. Batchelder. 
Etta A. Esterbrook. ' 



South-east. 



Emma A. Ckarlow, 
Lester Fletcher, 
'George E. Johnson, 
John L. Jones, 
Wm. Malthouse. 



Estelle D. Heath, 
Lizzie C. Matthews, 
Emma A. Pratt, 
Mattie C. Pratt. 



14 



North School. 



Annie Gallagher, 
Lizzie Ryan, 
Nellie Ryan, 
Hattie Smith, 
Willie Butter-field, 
Elmer Rouillard, 
Jimmie Ryan, 
Bertie Smith, 
George Smith. 




TABULAR VIEW. 







a 




? 


O j9 >. 










> lO !X3 . 


SCHOOLS. 


TEACHERS. 


o 

o 

A . 

cm S 


3 :0 

S3 U 

O CU . 

a J ? 
u S 5 

aj 3 © 


a 

CS 

3 


. e « 
g bo p immf 

•"• 






o o 






«!.«',<» 






bo 

a 
cy 


* ss 




a3 « i S « , a> a 






| 2 




a H a H a a 






> ? 


> 


a 0. 






£ 


r*" 


<i 


» [55 !55 




Spring Term. 












Centre \ grammar, 


Mis* J. S. Bartlett, 


a 


$35 ®0 


23 


10 


12 


" A. E. Tucker, 


2 


32 00 


32 


26.20 


2 8 


\Y**\ s Grammar. 
» est. | primary, 

South 5 Grammar, 
south. j primary, 


11 A. II. Allen, 


;> 


40 00 


32 


20 


3 1!) 


" A.E.Hall, 


2 


:<6 oo 


37 


34 





" M. A. Edwards, 


o 


40 00 


4) 


36.25 


L2 


i> 


" S. L. Burr, 


2 


36 00 


43 


37 




16 


North. 


" L.L.Keyes, 


2.23 2(5 00 


18 


15.40 


3 


11 


East, 


" M. C. Harriss, 


3 39 oo 


17 


16.70 






12 


South En st, 


" E. 0. Clark, 

Totals. 


2.50 32 00 

18.75 j $307 00 


20 


18.80 


1 




17 




265 


232.35 


6 


15 


109 




Fall Term. 












/<>„(,.* C Grammar, 
Centie. J Primary / 


Miss J. S. Bartlett, 


o 


!*35 00 


15 


11 




1 


fi 


" A. E. Tucker, 


a 


32 00 


36 


20.30 




jj 


w/«+ ) Grammar, 
West J Primary, 


" A. II. Allen, 


2.50 


44 00 


37 


32.60 




'J 


" O. A. Hopkins, 


2.50 


40 00 


42 


39 


1 


12 11 


soutli < Grammar, 
.south. t Primar y, 


" M. A. Edwards, 


2 


40 00 


44 


37.50 




" S.L. Burr, 


2.15 j 36 00 


•13 


37.60 




North, 


" L. L. Keyes, 


2.26 20 00 


18 


15.70 


1 -; 


East, 


" M. C. Harriss, 


2.15 30 00 


20 


17.70 


i 


South-East, 


" E. O. Clark, 


2.25 


32 00 


20 


17 70 


i! 




Totals, 


10. SO 


$315 00 


275 


238. 10 


2 23 78 




Winter Term. 










Centre y Grammar, 
oeutie. j primary, 


Mr. C.P. Scarle, 
Miss A.E.Tucker, 


2 
1.75 


$60 OO 
, 36 00 


17 
40 


36.40 
31 


23 


11 


woof t (Grammar, 
west. | primary, 


" A. H. Allen, 


3 


44 00 


44 


;s4.so 


17 


IS 


" O. A. Hopkins. 


1.50 


40 00 


42 


36 


1 


in 


smith £ Grammar, 
South. ^p ri mary, 


" M. A. Edwards, 


1.75 


10 00 


44 


36 


12 


A 


" S.L. Burr, 


1.80 


40 00 


40 


30.60 


1 


7 


North, 


" E. F. Reed, 


3.50 


32 00 


18 


15.48 


1 


2.) 


East, 


" M. C. Harriss, 


2.75 


38 00 


26 


19.74 


5 


17 


South-East, 


'• E. S. Brooks, 


2.50 


36 00 


19 


16.30 


1 


H 




Totals, 


20.55 


$366 00 


™ 


255.20 


1 1 60 


99 




Aggregate for the year, 


59.10 


$088 00 


860 


|725.6D 





98 


286 



Total average attendance during- the year, 81, 



FINANCIAL REPORT. 



Incidentals include brooms, ink, chalk, blackboard erasers, cleaning 
houses, repairing furnace, sawing some wood, etc., etc. These items or 
similar ones are included under this head in every report. 

South School. 
Drawn from the treasury, $688 38 

Received from the town of Stow, 1G 00 

Balance from last year. 53 01 



$757 39 



Paid teachers. 401 40 

" for fuel, 56 34 
•• •• care of house and incidentals (about 25 

items.) 34 ( .)2 

Balance on hand, 204 73 



$757 30 



James Tuttlk, Committee. 
West School. 



$644 88 




25 30 







$670 24 


534 00 




69 60 




2G 50 




40 14 






$670 24 



Drawn from the treasury. 
Balance from last year. 

Paid teachers, 

" for fuel, 

" " care of house, &c, 
Balance on hand. 



Joseph Noyes, Committee. 
Center School. 

Balance on hand and drawn from the treasury, $640 00 

$(540 00 

Paid teachers, 451 00 

l - for fuel, 71 26 

•• - care of house, incidentals, &c, 32 03 

Cash on hand, S5 71 

$640 00 

Harris Cowdrey, Committee. 



1G 




East School. 




Drawn from the treasury, 


$298 34 


Balance from last year. 


7 91 


Paid to teacher, 


• 228 25 


for fuel, and drawing and preparing,* 


57 44 


' ; care of house, &c, 


L4 42 


Balance ou hand, 


6 14 



$30G 25 



$306 ->rj 

E. J. Robbtns, Committee. 

* there are two tons of coal on hand. 

Southeast School. 

Drawn from the treasury. $255 86 

Balance from last year, 8 83 

$264 69 
Paid teachers, 
for fuel, 
*" care of house, &c. 
Balance on hand, 

$264 69 

John Fletcher, 2d, Committee. 
North School. 
Drawn from the treasury. 
Balance from last year. 



234 00 


20 00 


9 67 


1 02 



Paid teachers, 
for fuel, 
u care of house, &c, 
Balance on hand. 



$263 86 


1 GO 


229 00 


20 00 


11 12 


5 34 


Iarriss, C 


$2,500 00 


219 05 


167 01 



$265 4(] 



§2Go 46 



Amount of money raised by the town, 
Income from the State school fund, 
u Dog fund, 

Total, $2,886 06 

Number of children reportedly the assessors, between the ages of 

rive and fifteen, 281. 

Sum appropriated by the town for each scholar, $8 89;}- 



REPORTS 



OF THE 



SELECTMEN AND OTHER OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON, 



FROM 



February 26, 1875, to February 26, 1876 



INCLUDING THi 



3IARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS IN 1875 



ALSO, THE 



KEPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 



ACTON: 

Printed at the Office of the Patbiot, So. Actox. 

1876. 



Selectmen's Report. 



Appropriations and Receipts. 


Unexpended balance of last year. 


$8,954 55 


Regular Town Grant, 


9,000 00 


Town Grant for Schools, 


2,500 00 


Town Grant for Highways, 


2,000 00 


Overlay on Taxes, 


215 38 


Corporation Tax, 


553 06 


National Bank Tax, 


417 08 


State Aid to Jan. 1,1875, 


232 00 


State School Fund, 


206 35 


Mt. Hope Cemetery, 


23 00 


Wooodlawn Cemetery, 


36 00 


Dog Fund, 


190 08 


Use of Town Hall and Cellar, 


63 00 


State Tax. 


1,580 00 


County Tax, 


1,013 62 


C. N. McLean, for Stone, 


20 00 


Insurance Dividend, 


18 15 


Liquor Licenses, 


400 00 


Bowker Fund, 


72 00 


Cash of Charles E. Miller, 


750 00 


" " Phineas Puffer, 


500 00 


,k John F. Nichols, 


500 00 


*' " Middlesex Institution for Savings, 


3,500 00 




CQO 7 A A 07 




■ ■■ fpO A, f t* u 1 


Expenditures. 




SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS, 




Paid James Tuttle, South District, 


$688 38 


Joseph Noyes, West " 


644 88 


Daniel Tuttle, Centre " 


640 00 


Daniel Harris, East ** 


298 34 


John Fletcher, 2d, South East District, 


255 86 


J. W. Loker, North District, 


263 86 




$2,791 32 



Repairs on School Houses. 

Paid James Tuttle, South District, $12 66 

Joseph Noyes, West " 1 25 

Daniel Tuttle & H. Cowdry. Centre District, 42 21 



3 

Paid Darnel Harris, East District, $5 98 

James Tuttle, incidentals for South District, 16 30 

Joseph Noyes, incidentals for West District, 12 00 



Repairs on Highway*, 

Paid P. II. Whitcomb, breaking roads, 1875, 
George II. Harris, " *' • 

Charles Wheeler, " " hi 

Abram II. Jones, " -'* ' ; 



$15 


00 


5 


70 


50 


25 


35 


80 



$99 49 



$112 75 



Regular Highway Work. 

Paid Charles Wheeler, $1,1*0 96 

Abram II. Jones, 903 28 

Abram II. Jones, Brown Hill, 2C7 94 

S2,322 18 

By Order of Couuty Commissioners. „ 



Paid Charles Wheeler, road in West Acton, 


^1,190 36 


Books ami Printing. 




Paid posters, man and wife wanted to take charge 


of Town Farm, 


$1 50 


500 Assessors' Schedules of Valuation, 


7 00 


Warrants, 


10 50 


500 Selectmen's Reports, 
500 Town " 


14 00 

66 00 


600 Valuation " 


100 00 


Desk Books for North School, 


3 99 


" " " West " 


2 92 


« East 


3 37 


u u Center " 


6 29 


J. E. Cutter, tax book, 


2 00 




C O 1 T KT 


Support of Poor. 




Paid J. E. Cutter, deficiency on Town Farm as 
per report of Overseers of the Poor to 
April 1, 1875. 

Coffin for John D. Whitney, 

Supplies u " 

Sarah B. Childs, 


$945 70 

13 00 

4 15 

16 49 


Patrick Sullivan, 


14 25 


George Cur tin, 
Sarah Hunt, 


26 00 
30 00 


John II. Whitney, supplies and burial 




expenses, 
Abel W. Jones, to Oct. 1, 1875, 


125 93 
137 50 



4 

Paid Martin Pike, $8 00 

. J. E. Cutter, journey to Waltham respect- 
ing J. H. Whitney, 2 00 
J. E. Cutter, journey to Watertown, respect- 
ing Samuel Bacon, 2 00 
J. E. Cutter, journey to Westford, respect- 
ing Joseph Whitney, I 50 



Town I>ebt. 




$1,326 52 


Paid li. J. Hapgood, 


$400 do 




Josiah Dow. 


G00 00 




Geo. W. Gates 


200 00 




John Grimes, 


300 00 




D. J. Witherbee, 


1,2000 00 




Ebenezer Conant, 


2,000 00 




Isaac Reed, 


1,200 00 




J. W. Livermore, 


600 00 




Luther Conant, 


1,000 00 




J. E. Billings, 


200 00 


S7,70<» 00 


State Aid. 




Paid Hattie W. Wilder, 


$44 00 




Rebecca C. Wright. 


48 00 




A. R. Summer, 


3 00 




Geo. W. Sawyer, 


21 00 




Richard H. L. Talcott. 


30 00 




.Maria Flu, 


41 00 


$190 00 


Cemetery Expenses. 




Paid Martin Pike, Woodlawn Cemetery, ' 


k",4 \)o 




William 1). Tuttle, 


2 00 




Gate hinges, • 


78 




Work on trees. 


1 80 




Irons for posts, 


40 




Trees and expenses, 


13 75 




Charles llanscom, 


1 60 




Gilman Pickens, 


2 20 




Luke Tuttle. 


c, so 




Watering trees, 


1 00 




Elbridge Robbins for land. 


3 50 




Fisk & Spaulding, sign. 


15 25 




painting sign. 


6 05 




Staking lots. 


2 00 




William I>. Davis, sign and painting, 


4 1 1 




Mr. Pike, setting post. 


5 





Paid J. E. Reed for post, 
L. U. Holt for pump, 
Painting and lettering gates, Mt. Hope 

Cemetery, 
Moving the Rowell family, 
John Fletcher, 2d, setting tie rings, 
( Irass seed, 
W. W. Worster, 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, acknowledging deeds, 
Bedding up 20 lots and removing roots, 
Clearing avenues, 
One pump and pipe, 
Box for pump, 

J. Holt for air chamber and setting same, 
F. Stone, 
Digging and stoning well, 

Town Officers. 

Paid F. P. Wood, Superintendent of schools, 
Phineas Wetherbee, taking inventory, mak- 
ing and copying taxes, also copying valu- 
ation and taxes for printing, 
William D. Tuttle, taking inventory and 

making taxes, 
Services as Town Clerk and making report, 
John E. Cutter, collecting taxes, 
James E. Billings, services as Selectman, 
Hiram J. Hapgood, services as Selectman, 
Frank IT. Whitcomb, services as Selectman, 





.50 


$5 


00 


5 


00 


7 


00 


1 


50 




50 




50 


1 


00 


50 


00 


22 


00 


23 


28 




08 


o 


70 


1 


00 


22 


00 



;oo oo 



n 25 



28 
25 
70 

62 

50 
40 



70 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 






Law Suits. 




Paid G. A. Somerby, Brooks case, 


si 00 00 


Printing briefs, 


7 50 


G. A. Somerby, Reed case, 


400 00 


Printing briefs, 


5 00 


Clerk of Court for copies, 


24 00 


N. B. Bryant, A. W. Jones' case, 


25 00 


AV~. W. Davis, 


00 


Daniel Tuttle, u 


s oo 


Witnesses. Reed case, 


230 00 


Rewards. 


• 


Paid Pmder & Harris, 


$250 00 


Spalding & Taggart, 


200 00 


E. P. Brown, 


50 00 



S2G0 10 



$406 95 



$8*4 50 



$500 eo 



6 



Centennial Celebration. 



Paid Luther Conant, Car Fares, 


$41 45 


Music, 


196 25 


Cleaning guus 


20 00 


Opening hall, 


10 00 


Dinner tickets. 


192 00 


Uniforms, 


283 25 


Flags and banners, 


37 00 


Home celebration, 


29 46 


Printing, express aud freight, 


13 75 


Team and driver, 


7 00 


Use of equipments, 


12 25 


Interest on Notes. 




Paid Hiram J. Hapgood. 


$13 61 


Oliver W. Drew, 


42 00 


Luther Billings, 


54 04 


Jonas K. Putney, 


45 50 


James E. Billings, 


126 56 


John Goldsmith, 


162 50 


Geo. W. Gates, 


17 38 


Charles Morris. 


24 50 


Phineas Puffer, 


175 00 


Josiah Dow, 


IS 20 


Isaac Reed, 


lit) (JO 


Luther Conant, 


111 00 


Frederick Rouillard, 


186 66 


Joseph Barker. 


66 25 


Mrs. M. P. Hosmer, 


70 oo 


John Grimes. 


13 60 


Daniel Harris, 


53 57 


Elizabeth Ilanscom, 


47 (50 


Patrick Farrell, 


103 79 


Lewis Rouillard, 


12 70 


Joseph Noyes, 


13 GO 


John F. Xickles, 


39 17 


David M. Handley, 


196 25 


Jonathan A. Piper, 


39 3,6 


Daniel J. AVetherbee, 


91 00 


Cyrus Conant, 


147 00 


Calvin Harris, 


13 00 


Oliver Whitcomb, 


31 97 


J. W. Livermore, 


52 55 


Simon Tuttle, 


39 20 


Geo. Reed. 


OS 50 


Geo. H. Harris, 


12 5 4 



$342 41 



Paid Thomas F. Noyes, 
Sarah C. Noyes, 

Temporary loau, Concord Bank, 
John Wilson, 


$25 25 
50 50 
42 88 
31 50 


Abatement of Taxes. 

Paid John E. Cutter 1872, 
1873, 
1874, 


$104 26 

328 91 

63 35 



$2,344 



$496 52 



Miscellaneous. 



Paid Edward Tattle, water for Center School, 
Reuben L. Reed, sealing weights and 

measures, 
Daniel Harris, pump for East Scliool, 
Levi W. Stevens, lumber and labor for 

old school house in West Acton, 
Geo. W. Sawyer, care of town c^ck, 
Repairs on clock, 
" " lamps, 

Eighteen gallons oil, 
Wicks, 
Chimnevs. 
Coal, 
Four lights of glass, f 

Li 

Setting glass. 

One broom, 

Wash in g floor. 

One cord wood, 

Repairs on conductors, 

Opening hall 20 times, 

Francis Jones, painting and lettering 
guide boards, 

Waldo Littlefield, painting and repair- 
ing hearse, 

John White, posts for school house lot 
fence North District, 

A. H. Jones, 2 plates for road scrapers. 

Lumber for railing, 

Labor, setting guide posts, 

F. Dwight, attending funerals of 4 1 

© J © 

persons, 
F. Dwight, removing bodies in Rowell, 

Spauldiug & Fuller lots, 
Dog notice, 



$2 50 



20 


00 


16 


50 


7 


52 


5 


83 


1 


85 


4 


15 


S3 34 




15 


1 


25 


2 


80 




67 




32 




42 


2 


50 


5 


00 


1 


65 


L4 


50 


31 


40 


27 


60 


17 


00 


13 


00 


24 


92 


3 


87 



132 00 

6 50 
1 00 



s 

Paid Returning 51 deaths, SI 2 75 

E. A. Gates, opening Hall 9 times, 7 50 

Washing hall and chimneys, 2 25 

Care of clock, 4 15 

Tolling bell for 4 deaths, 80 

William D. Tuttle, express, 2 45 

Running line of road in South Acton, 5 00 

Relocating road at West Acton, o 50 
Journey to Sudbury, to make out election 

returns, 2 00 
Making plan of school house lot, North 

Acton, 1 50 

Dog license blanks and postage, 1 50 

Meeting, Tax Commissioners, 1 50 

Collecting and recording 35 births, 17 50 

Recording 52 deaths, 7 20 

" 14 marriages, 2 00 

J. E. Cutter, express, 50 

discount on taxes, 798 50 

summoning 20 persons, to 

take oath of office, 2 50 
.1. E. Billings, land and fencing school 

house laud, East District, 82 01 

Express and postage, 2 90 

Making and recording deeds, 4 65 

License Blanks, 2 00 



S1,312 90 



Receipts from Feb. 26, lS75,to Feb. 26, 1876. 

Unexpended balance as per report of Feb. 20, 

1S75, $8,954 o.') 

Appropriations and Receipts, 23,789 72 



$32,744 27 



Expenditures. 

Support of Schools, S2,791 32 

Repairs on School Houses, 99 49 

u highways, 112 75 

Regular highway work, 2,322 18 

By order of County Commissioners, 1,490 36 

Books and printing, 217 57 

Support of poor, 1,320 52 

Town Debt, 7,700 00 

State Aid, 190 00 

Cemetery Expenses, 260 10 

Town officers, 406 95 

Law suits, 814 50 

Interest on Town Debt, 2,344 39 

Miscellaneous, 1.312 90 



!) 



State Tax, 


$1,580 


00 


County Tax, 


1,013 


62 


Centennial Celebration, 


842 


41 


Rewards, 


500 


00 


Abatement of Taxes, 


496 


52 

$25,821 58 


Balance in Treasury Feb. 2(3, 187G, 


$6,922 69 


Town Debt. 






Daniel Harris, 


$819 


46 


Elizabeth Hanscom, 


694 


58 


Isaac T. Flagg, 


105 


43 


Calvin Harris, 


202 


63 


James A Billings, 


202 


63 


Oliver Whitcomb, 


506 


41 


J. K. Putney, 


688 


43 


John Goldsmith, 


2,640 


08 


Joseph Barker, 


517 


16 


Lewis Rouillard, 


204 40 


Joseph Noyes, 


205 


16 


Jonathan A. Piper, 


205 


16 


Luther Billings. 


202 


86 


David M. Handley, 


3,044 


00 


Simon Tut tie, 


609 


00 


Patrick Farrell, 


1,156 


90 


Josej)h Barker, 


502 


16 


George Reed, 


456 


75 


Jonathan A. Piper, 


404 


65 


George II. Harris, 


200 


60 


John Wilson, 


500 


66 


Frederick Rouillard, 


2,606 


65 


Charles Morris, 


367 


09 


Patrick Farrell, 


413 


80 


Phineas Puffer, 


2,607 


50 


Sarah C. Noyes, 


801 


20 


Thomas F. Noyes, 


400 


60 


M. P. Hosmer, 


1,042 


00 


Oliver W. Drew, 


632 


60 


Charles E. Miller, 


777 


75 


Phineas Puffer, 


517 


50 


John F. Nickels, 


511 


83 


Middlesex Institution for Savings, 


3,550 


16 


.John F. Nickles, 


597 


32 


»» i. ( ( 


608 


60 


James E. Billings, 


419 


88 


i. a 


515 


00 

$28,436 :>[) 



10 

Amount due from State Aid, 
Estimated value of Old School House. 
Due from Town Treasurer. 



$230 00 

600 00 

6,922 09 



37,752 69 



Acton, Feb. 26 



Balance against the Town, $20,683 90 

JAMES E. BILLINGS, ( Selectmen 
HIRAM J. HAPGOOD. ] 
FRANK H. WHITCOMB, I 
1876. 



of 

Acton. 



REPORT OF THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

AT THE ALMSHOUSE IX ACTON, 
For the Year Ending April lst,1^7ti, 



Articles on hand April 1, 18« <>. 




1 Horse. 


$150 00 7") bush, pot;;: 




L3 Cows. 


700 00 50 lbs. ham. 


7 50 


6 1-2 tons i 


L30 00 Lo0 lbs. Pork, 




42 barrels, 


5 2") 11 lbs. butter, 


. 3 63 


1200 lbs. shorts. 


13 80 Salt piokl< 


1 00 


30 fowls. 


1.") OX) i i; g lions soap, 


I 5 I 


Grass seed. 


3 50 1-2 bbl. apples, 


1 00 


(I market box 


1 00 30 lbs. Ian!. 


5 40 




1,087 33 


Receipts from Town Farm, IS?;*. 




Received for cow>, 


S142 79 Received for lumber, 


>>.'! 36 


poultry. 


39 \~> old iron, 


4 82 


milk, 


1,121 15 " windows 


5 31 


apples, 


434 99 cucumbers. 


1 40 


oxen, 


105 oo grease, 


I 00 


use of oxen 


, 10 75 feathers. 


1 5o 


calve-. 


113 94 ■ old lead. 


1 60 


pork, 


67 50 horse baitin 


y t 1 00 


potatoes. 


10 45 wood, 


4:i 62 


squash. 


8 85 berries. 


4 00 


e CTor s, 


8 38 





$2,139 94 



11 



Paid for 





Expenses. 




Labor, $159 00 


Saleratus, $1 24 


Flour, 


64 07 


Spices, 3 99 


Beans. 


7 67 


Crackers, 14 80 


Tobacco, 


9 35 


Oil, 5 09 


Cheese, 


11 00 


Saltpetre, 65 


Coffee. 


64 


Washing Soda, 2 00 


Onions, 


81 


Whip, 37 


Sugar, 


36 32 


Peas, 49 


Molasses, 


20 50 


Grass seed, millet. 


Tea, 


8 41 


&c. 16 86 


Fish, 


11 99 


Blacksmiths Bill, 8 18 


Keeping Cows, ! 


$41 70 


Vinegar, 4 16 


Tin Ware, 


3 68 


Cloth and clothing, 24 41 


Nails, 


20 


Cream Tartar, ' 4 05 


Use of Bull, 


6 00 


Candles, 75 


Sweet Potatoes, 


60 


Rice, Q>Q 


Barrels, 


7 55 


Pails, $1 00 


Lard, 


8 50 


Pork Barrel, 1 00 


Butter, 


77 29 


Filing Saws, 1 75 


Hat, 


1 62 


Pump Box, 85 


Dr. Hutehins bill. 


, 7 25 


Clothes Pins, 12 


Dr. Sanders bill, 


10 85 


Caterpillar Brush, 25 


Medicine, 


2 00 


Rosin, 15 


Raisins, 


1 20 


Harrow Frame, 50 


Basket, 


60 


Plaster, 50 


Card, Comb, brush, 1 


Phosphate, 6 82 


Starch, 


24 


Butchering. 3 67 


Snuff. 


67 


Expenses Market- 


Rope, 


62 


ing, 11 80 


Condition Powders, 50 


Market boxes, 72 


Yeast. 


1 12 


Cabbage and tomato 


Blueing, 


30 


plants, 1 00 


Jug, 


25 


Set Measures, 1 00 


Matches. 


1 70 


Oxen. 125 00 


Scraps. 


1 00 


Cows, 412 50 


Salt, 


4 93 


Pigs, 47 00 


Soap, 


13 96 


Grain, , 516 94 


Box Greese, 


25 


Cutting Wood, 67 03 


Halter, &c, 


1 20 


Measuring Wood, 75 


Boots and Shoes, 


6 37 


Newspaper, 2 65 


Tools, 


9 80 


Coffin and Robe for 


Brooms, 


1 15 


J. Hayden, 13 00 


Castings for Stove, 2 00 


Wash Board, 50 


Meat/ 


131 75 


Cabbages, 1 28 



12 






Expenses. 






Use of Plow, SI 75 
Freight bill, 35 
Mop Handle, 33 


Mending Wa< 
Bar Posts, 
Stationery, 

ckup, $52 27 

5 75 

400 00 

35 00 

7 00 

16 00 


£on, 75 

$2 00 

40 


Lumber, Nails, Locks and Labor to finish Lo 
Bedstead and Bedding for Lockup, 
Services of Asaph Parlin, 

" " J. E. Cutter as Overseer, 

' ; " J. Conant, 

" " E. H. Cutler, 


$1,980 07 


Total amount of Expenditures, 

" " Receipts, 
Drawn from Treasury to balance, 
Interest on Farm, v 


$305 15 
240 00 


$2,505 09 
2,139 94 


Victualing 347 Tramps, 


$173 50 


G05 15 



Cost -of supporting Poor on the Farm, 431 65 

Whole number of persons exclusive of Tramps, supported in 
Almshouse, six; average number, five; present number, four. 

JOHN E. CUTTER, ( Overseers of 

ELISHA H. CUTLER, \ Poor. 

Acton, April 1, 1876. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT FOR 1875 



Births in Acton in 1875. 

No. Date of Birth. Name of Child. Names of Parents. 

1. Jan. 2, Mary Josephine Sherry, daughter of John and Mary Sherry. 

2. " 14, Ella A. Priest, daughter of Jacob and Adeline A. Priest. 
o. " 31, Julia Calanan, daughter of Daniel and Ellen Calanan. 

4. Feb. 15, Agnes Redding, daughter of Patrick and Hannah Bedding. 

5. Mar. 11, Edith Augusta Flagg, daughter of Isaac T. and Lucy A. 

Fla°*°' 
(>. " 15, Florence Hersom Flagg, daughter of Isaac Warren and Emma 
Flagg. 

7. " 21, Ethel Alta Olds, daughter of Edward E. and Mary A. olds. 

8. April 2, Carrie Elizabeth Taylor, daughter of Moses Emery and Clara 

Taylor. 

9. '' 20, Myra Adclia Gardner, daugher of George and Vioietta F. 

Gardner. 

10. May 23. Olive Medora Wheeler, daughter of Sanford and Susan E. 

Wheeler. 

11. ;> 24. Herbert F. Randall, son of Freeman'L. and Amelia A. Ran- 

dall. 

12. *' 27, Etta Roxanna Hall, daughter of Delette IL and Susie A. 

Hall. 

13. " 27, Henrietta Mav Clark, daughter of Herbert T. and Mary J. 

Clark. 

14. " 30, Arthur LeRoy Dole, sou of Joseph Emery and Ida C. Dole. 

15. June ('», George Franklin Peirce, son of Frank G. and RosaPeirce. 

16. ; ' 16, Ida Augusta Hapgood, daughter of Hiram J. and Augusta A. 

Hapgood. 

17. '" 30, George Frederick Hurd, son of William and Mary A. Hurd. 

18. July 12, Honora Connors, daughter of Morris and Honora Connors. 
11). Aug. 6, Harry Sawyer, son of Thomas J. and Kate Sawyer. 

20. ' k 28, Rebecca Fletcher Mullholland, daughter of Hugh and M 

Ellen Mullholland. 

21. Sept. 2, Charles Elyin Smith, son of Henry M. and Abbie B. Smith. 

22. " 20, Charlotte Emily Conant, daughter of Luther and S. Augusta 

Con ant. 
28. " 2 ( .), Joseph Herman Farrar, son of Abel and Delina Farrar. 

24. " 30, Edward Sheridan, son of James and Kate E. Sheridan. 

25. Oct. 7, La Roy Clark Hanscom, son of Charles Waldo and Susan L. 

Hanscom, 
2C>. - : 16, Walter B. Sanders, son of Dr. Charles B. and Clara A. San- 
der's. 

27. Nov. 7, Laura Cenevra Ryerson, daughter of Lelloy A. and Laura 

Ryerson. 

28. " 16, Herman Lewis Purcell, son of Henry and Mary Ellen Parcel I- 

29. " 24, Dennis Bradley, son of Dennis and Hannah Bradley. 

;;0. '' 29, Margaret Peters, daughter of Philip and Margaret Peters. 
31. Dec. 12, Arthur Curtis liouillard, son of George and Emma Etta 

Rouillard. 
32 " 18, Jessi.' Parker Wood, daughter of Rev. F. 1*. and Abbie (>.. 

Wood. 
33. '• 18, Michael May, son of John and Julia May. 
:;4. " 21, John Hanaford, son of John and Mary Hanaford. 
35. '• 29, Grace Noble Boomer, daughter of John L. and Annie §►. 

Boomer. 

15 Males and 20 Females. 



14 

Marriages Recorded in Acton in 1875. 

No. Date of Marriage. Names of Parties . 

1. Jan. 12, Mr. Philip Peters of Acton, and Miss Maggie Burke of Hay- 

erhill. 

2. " 13, Mr. Elliot D. Clappof Worcester and Miss Marietta Prentiss of 

Acton. 

3. Feb. 18, Mr. Francis J. Campbell of London England and Miss Sophia 

Elizabeth Faulkner of Acton. 

4. Mar. 24, Mr. Luke Kendall of Koyalton Vt. and Miss S. Eldora Esta- 

brook of Acton. 

5. April 6, Mr. Willie A, Pickens of Acton and Miss Alice Cox of East 

Dixville, Me. 

(>. " 15, Rev. Ephraim Hapgood of Acton and Miss Catherine H. Hart- 
ley, of Waltham. 

7. May 10, Mr. Samuel S. Perkins of Lynn and Miss Josephine Hapgood 
of Acton. 

s. June 9, Mr. Henry M. V. B. Whitney and Miss Cora Fiske both of 
Acton. 

'.). " 23, Mr. Geo. F. Flagg and Miss Lottie C. Faulkner both of Ac- 
ton. 

10. Aug. IT, Mr. James W. Wheeler of Acton and Mrs. Elvira Sweatt of 

Boston. 

11. Nov. 24, Mr. Geo. T. Knowlton of Acton and Miss Clara Maker of 

Lowell. 

12. " 25, Mr. Frederic M. Sisson of Acton and Miss Helen Douglass 

of Windsor Locks Conn. 

13. Dec. 4, Mr. Osha Knowlton and Miss Al vena Burnham both of Ac- 

ton. 

14. " 22, Mr. Jonathan P. Fletcher and Miss Lizzie Roth both of Acton. 

15. ,; " Mr. Samuel Jones Jr. of Acton and Miss Emma E. Hayward 

of Concord. 



Deaths in Acton in 1875. 
"No. Date of Death. Names and ages of Deceased. 

1. Jan. 4. Mrs. Hannah R. Burnham, aged 91 years, 4 months, 

10 days. 

2. " 4. Willie Edward Tuttle, son of Horace and Arethusa M. 

Tuttle, aged 2 months, 27 days. 

3. " 10. Miss Susie A. Potter, aged 27 y^ars, 5 months. 

4. "' 16. Mrs. Laura Spaulding, aged 73 years, 3 months, 2 days. 

5. " 17. Erminie L. Davis, daughter of Alviu A. and Mary T. Davis, 

aged 8 years, 4 months, 17 days. 

6. " 19. Charlie B. Parker, son of Edwin C. and Hannah H. Parker, 

aged 8 years, 11 months, 1 day. 

7. " 20. Anna Maria Cohollon, daughter of John and Margaret 

Cohollon aged years,*3 months, 16 days. 

8. " 28. Patrick Cohollon, son of John and Margaret Cohollon, aged 

3 years. 10 months, 21 days. 
0. " 28. Mrs. Mary Symonds, wife of O. A. Symonds, aged 52 years, 
2 mouths, days. 
30. Anna C. Parker, daughter of Edwin C. and Hannah H. 
Parker, aged 2 years, 4 months, 15 days. 
Grace Lillian Hosmer, daughter of Lucius S. and Ella F. 

Hosmer, aged 2 years, 3 months, 27 days. 
Mrs. Lizzie M. Fehan, aged 24 years, 7 mouths, 22 days. 
Mrs. Clarissa J. Fletcher, wife of Deacon John Fletcher, 
aged 75 years, 5 months, 22 days. 
14. "" 17. John Desmore, aged 11 years, 5 months. 



10. 


tt 


30. 


11. 


Feb. 


1. 


12. 
13. 




5* 

8. 



15 

15. 4t 21. Clarence Rouillard, son of George and Clara RouillarJ, aged 

10 months, 22 days. 

16. Mar. 2. Hannah Eedding, daughter of Patrick and Hannah Redding. 

aged 1 year, 9 months, 9 days. 

17. " 5. Mr. George By water, aged 20 yeais, 10 months. 

18. M 18. Ellen Redding, daughter of Patrick and Hannah Red- 

ding, aged 6 years. 4 months, 19 days. 

19. '' 19. Jane Redding, daughter of same, aged 3 years, 6 months, 

25 days. 

20. April 7. Mary Josephine Sherry, daughter of John and Mary Sherry. 

aged 3 months, 5 days. 

21. " 13. Mrs. Lucretia Miller, aged 64 years, 5 months. 

22. " 22. Mrs. Mary Sherry, aged To year-. 

23. '• 27. Mr. Thomas Darling, aged 43 years, 1 month, 26 day-. 

24. May 3. Mr. Alden Fuller, aged 77 years, 7 months, 7 days. 

25. " 4. Miss Hattie M. Johnson, aged 20 years, 6 months. 

26. " 4. Myra Adelia Gardner, daughter of George and Yidetta F. 

Gardner, aged 14 days. 
'i~. " 6. Dr. Harris Co wdrey, for nearly 50 years a resident practis- 
ing Physician of Acton, aged 72 years, 8 months. 

28. " 23. Mrs. Marietta E. White, wife of Abrani White and daugh- 

ter of Enoch and Emeline Hall, aged 34 years, 11 months. 

29. " 24. Mrs. Miranda Barker, wife of Joseph Barker, aged 61 years. 

9 days. 

30. June 4. Miss Lucinda Flagg, aged 70 years, 4 month s. 

31. '* 14. Mr. Sumner Cole, aged 77 years, 2 months, 1 day. 

32. July 2. James Daily, son of John and Ellen Daily, [aged 4 years, 4 

4 months. 2 days. 

33. " 3. Margaret E. Daily, daughter of same, aged2 years. 
-34. " 5. Mr. Horace Tuttle, aged 75 years, 3 months. 

35. " 11. Phebe M. Folsom, daughter of Benj, and Eliza A. Fol- 

som, aged 4 months, 1 day. 
30. " 17. Mr. Joab "Hayden, aged 72 years. 
37. •• 22. Mrs. Tabitha H. Wood, widow of Lowell Wood, aged 7 ( .) 

\ years, 3 months, days. 
3S. •* 25. Mr." Jerry Lyons, aged 35 years. 

39. " 20. George W. Fay, son of Charles G. and Harriet M. Fay, 

aged 3 years, 5 months, 17 days. 

40. Aug. 15. Arthur C. Hall, son of Woodbury E. and Eliza A. Hall, 
aged 5 months, 11 days. 

Mrs. Bridget AVallace, nged 97 years. 
Mi. Lewis Beck, aged 04 years. 9 months, 23 days. 
Mrs. Ellen M. Bobbins, wife of Elbridge J. Eobbius, aged 33 

years, 2 months, 18 days. 
Miss Amelia E. Perkins, daughter of Isaiah B. and MaryE. 

Pei kins, aged 20 years, 1 month, 14 days. 
Miss Ella F. Reed, daughter of Benjamin and Harriet Beed, 

at;ed 24 years, 9 months, 22 days. 
Mrs. Lydia B. Howe, aged 82 years. 

Mrs. Hannah C. Aldricb, aged 84 years, 7 months, 28 days. 
Mis. Ruth W. hichardson, aged 74 years, 7 months", 7 days. 
Michael .1. Sherry, son of John and Bridget Sherry, aged 5 

years. 2 months, 17 days. 
Mr. John Conant, aged 54 years, 1 month, 1 day. 
Mr. Obed Augustus Symonds, aged 5;! years, 6 months. •>:; 

days. 
July 19, A son ot Edward C. and Louisa A. Cutcliff, aged 1 day. 



41. 
42. 
43. 

44. 


Sept. 


2!». 

7, 

25. 

30, 


45. 


Oct. 


19, 


40. 
47. 
48. 

49. 


Nov. 
Dec. 


23, 

28, 
20, 

n, 


50. 
51. 


n 


18, 
31, 



16 



Raines of Persons having: Dogs Licensed in 1875. 



Name of Owner. 



No. Name of Owner. 



Stephen Corliss, 

Francis Hosmer, 

Willie F. Richardson, 

Silas Conant Jr., 

John Temple, 

Henry Brooks, 

Luther Conant. 

John Fletcher & Sons, 

Luke Tuttle, 

Tuttles, Jones «fc Wetherbee, 

Neil Currie, 

Joseph Hard. 

Emerson F. Fuller, 

Levi Houghton. 

G. W. Knowlton, 

Aaron J. Fletcher, 

Alfred W. Gardner. 

Joseph Reed, 

James Waldron, 

William TTurd. 

Francis D wight. 

Emery D. Lothrop, 

Charles J.Willis, 

Wm. W. Wooster, ' 

George E. Priest, 

Elbridge Robbins, 

M. C. Estabrook, 

E. J. Robbins-, 

Josiah Piper, 

Willie E. Wood, 

Jairus C. Wheeler. 

John Daily. 

Alonzo L. Tuttle, 

Aaron S. Fletcher, 

George Conant, 

H. Waldo Tuttle, 

John Fletcher 2d, 

Aaron C. Handley, 

Geo. V. Mead, 

A. & O. W. Mead, 

Elnathan Jones, 

Lucius S. Hosmer, 

Daniel Tuttle, 

Geo. C. Conant. 

Oscar E. Preston. 

A. B. Brown, 

Elwyn Whitcomb, 
Total 100. 94 Males Fema 

Since making return to County 1 
female dog. 



Acton, March 1">. 1876 



No. 



Daniel Harris. 
Daniel Wetherbee. 
Daniel J. Wetherbee. 
Charles Wheeler. 
James E. Harris, 
John W. Randall, 
Amasa Knowlton, 
Edwin Tarbell, 
Walter A. Gilmore, 
Chas. A. Harrington 
Horace Tuttle 2d, 
John Conant, 
Horace Tuttle. 
Daniel H. Farrar, 
Lewis Beck. 
Augustus Fletcher, 
dames llannon. 
Martha 1). Ball. 
Moses Taylor. 
Charles Morris, 
Isaac Peed, 
Charles E. Teel, 
Henry Shapley, 
George R, Keyes, 
James F. Jones. 
M. C. Bennett, 
Jos. II. Bassett, 
Xahum C. Peed. 
Francis Pratt. 
S. Taylor Fletcher. 
Henry M. Smith, 
John W. Charter, 
Luther P. Forbush, 
Geo. W. Livermoiv. 
W. E. Faulkner, 
Henry M. Potter. 
Isaac Barker, 
John Grimes, 
Wm. II. Tufts, 
Allen Smith, 
Francis Pobbins. 
James Morris, 
Frank M. Lund, 
George C. Wright. 
Patrick Pedding, 
dames E. Richardson, 



$8. Amount of Licenses, sl'IS. 

easurer M. A. Snell has paid $5 for 1 

WM. D. TUTTLE, 

Town Clerk of Acton- 



THE 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



FOR THE 



SCHOOL YEAR, 1875-6 



ACTON: 
Printed at the Office of the Patriot, So. Acton. 
1876. 



REPORT 



To the Citizens of Acton. 

We the undersigned, your School Committee, having 
discharged the duties of our trust to the best of our ability, 
respectlully submit for your consideration the following re- 
port : 

As we survey the past year's operations of our schools 
we feel that we have reason to congratulate you upon the 
vitality and good degree of prosperity which have charac- 
terized this most important interest. None of our schools 
have been materially disturbed by sickness, so that they 
have been able to make up to some extent, what was lost 
by reason of a prevailing epidemic last winter. 

In most cases we have been able to secure experienced 
teachers, and with hardly an exception have been favored 
with teachers of excellent ability. The number of schools 
which have had the same teacher through the year is 
larger than usual, and, as the teachers have been efficient, 
this fact has secured a uniformity of system and discipline 
which has been greatly to the advantage of the schools. 
During the past year we have had more than the usual 
number of teachers who have insisted upon good order, 
which promises well for the morale of our schools in future 
terms. More than the usual number of cases of discipline 
have been brought to the notice of the Committee, but we 
are convinced this has not been for the reason that 
there has been more insubordinate conduct, but rather be- 
cause teachers have been more disposed to enforce the 
rules of a healthy discipline, even at the risk of having it 
said that there was trouble in school. It ought not to be 
expected that two hundred and fifty or three hundred chil- 
dren and youth will be kept in order during a whole year 
without some prominent cases of discipline. We think that 
the order of any of our schools during the past year will 
compare favorably with the order of any of the large 



3 

families in town, however well they may be 
regulated, and this is all that can be reasonably 
expected ; as there are jars at times in every large family, 
so it ought not to be a matter of surprise that there are 
some jars in the discipline of our large schools, and that 
the jars should be sufficiently severe at times to shake some 
discordant and irreconcilable elements out. Considering 
everything, we feel that the order of our schools during 
the past year has been far above the average, though this 
result has been reached by means of some severe effort. 

Not only has the discipline of our schools been commen- 
dable, during the period we are now reporting, but the 
progress of the scholars in a practical knowledge of their 
studies has been equally gratifying. In all our schools, 
save one, we have had two public examinations, during 
the year, which were largely attended by the parents and 
friends of the scholars and were very gratifying to those 
interested in the success of the schools. 

Passing from a general survey of our schools we beg 
leave to invite your attention to a few points with reference 
to which there may be room for improvement in the future. 

The influence of our schools upon\ the character of 
the Scholars. 

Your Committee, during the past year, have endeavored 
to protect the scholars from the vicious influences which 
sometimes pervade public schools. Certain things which 
have come to our notice have impressed us with the im- 
portance of vigilance in this particular ; but in order that 
this work may be done most efficiently, the co-operation of 
the parents is especially needed. Objection is made to 
our system of free schools, on the part of some, on the 
ground, that they are open to the danger now referred to. 
But there is no reason why .our schools can not be so con- 
ducted, as to be perfectly free from such an objection. 
We hope if any parent has reason to believe that there are 
vicious influences in a school, that a feeling of delicacv 
will not prevent the School committee being informed of 
the fact, that a proper remedy may be applied. The 
moral character is of too much consequence to be exposed 
to a danger of this kind. 



Choice of Studies. 



The Committee have found it necessary in some cases to 
decide how many and what studies should be persued by 
scholars. Scholars that are not at all ambitious are inclin- 
ed to take but few studies, and those the ones they are most 
familiar with, and not 'being fully occupied are easily 
tempted to be disorderly, besides losing the highest degree 
of benefit from the school. In the nature of the case, the 
teachers and committee must be allowed to use their discre- 
tion in this matter, and we hope no parent will feel 
that his rights are infringed upon by such action. 

Text Books. 

During the past year we have made no change in text 
books. We have introduced a few text books into one 
school, as an experiment simply. We have been more 
and more impressed of late with the necessity of introduc- 
ing something, if possible, which will reader the study ot 
Grammar and Analysis less irksome to our scholars, es- 
pecially to the younger portion of them. Our attention 
has been called to what has seemed to us an excellent 
and most attractive text book upon that subject, viz. : March- 
es' Parser and Analyzer. For the purpose of testing its mer- 
its we introduced it into one of our schools and have found 
it so well fitted for its work that we would recommend that 
this book be generally used in the place of the Primary 
Grammars which have been used heretofore. 

Music. 

We have been much gratified in visiting the schools to 
note the fact that in so many of them the good offices of 
music have heen invoked, to relieve the otherwise some- 
what monotonous routine of school exercises. We have 
become so fully convinced of the good offices of a proper 
amount of singing in our schools that we have encouraged 
it as much as possible. It would meet with our hearty ap- 
proval if arrangements could be made so as to secure to 
our scholars some systematic instruction in music, though 
our lists of studies are already so large that we hardly see 
how much instruction of this kind can be imparted in the 
schools without endangering the success of the regular 
Studies. It has been suggested that only teachers compe- 



5 

tent to teach music be employed. But it will be found that 
teachers having that qualification and the other qualities 
which we consider essential, and are ready to be employed 
at the compensation which we feel abie to offer are very 
rare. A neighboring town sustains a course of singing 
schools in a public hall, which all the young people of the 
town are permitted to attend, and it is our impression that 
for such a town as ours, some such course as this would be 
of greater benefit to the musical education of our young 
people than any which could be adopted in connection with 
the schools. If the town were sufficiently impressed with 
the importance of this subject to put at the disposal of the 
Committee in each of the three principal villages, an amount 
of money sufficient to defray half of the expenses of a sing- 
ing school, with the condition that a similar amount should 
be raised by private subscription, the end would be accom- 
plished, and we would have three good courses of singing 
schools in town each year. 

Sympathy with Teachers. 

In view of the experience of the past year as well as of 
previous years, we feel moved to put in a plea for the man- 
ifestation of a more kindly sympathy with the teachers, in 
the prosecution of their work. Before Ave pass severe 
judgments upon teachers, let us bear in mind the following 
points : That the work in which they are engaged is one 
of arduous toil. There is hardly an occupation which 
makes such severe drafts upon the nervous system, as that 
in which our teachers are engaged. To be sure they 
are required to be in the school room but six hours 
each ■ day, but during these six hours their mental 
faculties must be constantly active to test the accu- 
racy of the scholars answers, their will power must be 
constantly on the alert to preserve order, and at times their 
whole nervous, not to say anything about physical force, 
is called into exercise to administer necessary discipline, 
and at the same time they are constantly under the neces- 
sity of exercising their vocal organs and in almost all 
cases, find it necessary to exhaust their strength by being 
upon their feet, that they may the better overlook the 
scholars. Moreover, the work of the teacher carries with 
it a feeling of responsibility which is always oppressive 
and her successs depends upon so many things, beyond 



6 

her control, that, if anxious for success, she must have 
constantly a feeling of unrest, and all this exertion is 
put forth for a small compensation — considering the small 
part of the year employed, for a compensation less than 
what is received by servant girls and by operatives. In 
view of these things, do not condemn a teacher if she some- 
times loses her patience, a thing which most parents do 
every day. Endeavor to increase her strength and effi- 
ciencv by the manifestation of an interest in her work and 
in every possible way show your appreciation of the efforts 
she is making to render to your children a service of in- 
calculable value. Had such a course as this been pursued 
in one of our districts during the past year, the school 
might have been a perfect success, and a finely educated 
teacher, well qualified for her work, though of a sensitive 
nature, might have been spared an experience of abuse 
which will cause her always to have a low opinion of hu- 
man nature. We do not doubt that this teacher in the lat- 
ter part of her school appeared somewhat irritable toward 
some of her scholars, but this was not because she was 
naturally lacking in patience, but because her patience 
had been utterly exhausted by a persistent and utterly 
unjustifiable persecution. 

Importance of our School Work. 

The duties of our office during the past year have im- 
pressed us even more forcibly than we have been impressed 
before with the paramount importance of our system of 
Public Schools. 

It is impossible to follow the mental progress of scholars 
from term to term, and to note their often surprising develop- 
ments in intellectual power, without feeling powerfully im- 
pressed with the value of this educational work, unassuming 
though it be in its pretensions, as conducted by us. The 
importance of this interest is evident from the fact that 
were it in our power to choose what we will leave as a 
legacy to our children, true wisdom would dictate that we 
should choose for them an education in preference to any- 
thing else. We may bequeath to our children an unsullied 
name, and they may tarnish it ; we may hand down to 
them enormous wealth, and they may squander it, and it 
may work their ruin : but whatever we secure to them of 



mental discipline and of useful knowledge, will be to them 
a lever of power and an invaluable ornament so long as 
they live. 

Fellow Citizens : We return to you this trust with 
which you honored us and commend it to your most care- 
ful and generous consideration. So interest yourselves in 
this work and appropriate money for its prosecution so 
amply in this centennial year, when every important inter- 
est throughout the land is expected to revive and manifest 
a new life, that this may be the case with our free Public 
Schools, which, in the past have played such an impor- 
tant part in making us, as a nation, what we are. 

Passing from the consideration of our school system as 
a whole, we invite your attention to a brief reference to each 
school. 

South Grammar. 

This school was taught by Miss E. A. Gordon, a teacher 
of good judgment, experienced in the management of 
schools. Her schools were the largest in town and con- 
tained some elements which were hard to control, so that 
her work each term was very arduous. 

She was firm and uniform in her requisitions, as regards 
order, and did all that any teacher could have done in the 
premises to secure well ordered schools. As an instruct- 
or she was thorough and practical, and the scholars who 
applied themselves to their studies and endeavored to profit 
by her instructions made a steady and rapid progress 
throughout the year. The examination at the close of the 
winter term, was very thorough and highly satisfactory to 
all interested in the school. 

South Primary. 

This school was taught by Miss M. A. Forbush. Miss 
F. had never taught so large a school before and found 
her work very difficult at first. She had upon her roll in 
the spring term forty-nine names, of the youngest scholars 
in the district, a number which would have taxed the en- 
ergies of any teacher : Miss F. has a quick, nervous man- 
ner of speaking which made it a little difficult for the 
scholars to understand her, the first term, so that during 
that term she labored under some disadvantages. The 
Fall and Winter terms, under the management of this 



8 

teacher, were successful to a marked degree. The schol- 
ars seemed to catch the prompt, animated manner of the^ 
teacher, so that in a given time, they could take in and 
answer more questions correctly than any other equal 
number of young scholars that we ever saw. We are 
often so severely tried, with the dilatory habit of scholars 
in responding to questions, that we have come to estimate 
promptness in recitation as one of the most desirable qual- 
ities. The scholars in this school were not only prompt 
and animated, but made excellent progress in the acquisi- 
tion of knowledge, so that the school was a success in 
every respect. 

West Grammar. 

This school was taught by Miss A. H. Allen, who has 
had charge of this school nine terms. As we have re- 
ferred to her, as a teacher, in two of our annual reports, 
but a brief reference to her is demanded now. During a 
part of the year she suffered from ill health and was not 
able to devote quite her accustomed energy to her work, 
but her school during the year compared very favorably 
with the other schools in town. An examination was had 
at the end of the Winter term, which was very creditable 
to teacher and scholars. 

West Primary. 

This school was taught by Miss A. O. Hopkins, who 
has completed her seventh term in this school. It is some- 
times the case that as teachers become experienced in 
their vocation, they come to look upon the instruction of a 
primary school as beneath their ability, as of rather an 
inferior grade. But, we are happy to say, this is not the 
case with the teacher who has had charge of this school 
during the past year. Her energetic manner and enthu- 
siasm carries the impression that she feels herself to be 
engaged in a most important and responsible work, and 
she has been very successful in retaining the confidence of 
the parents and the love of her scholars. We consider 
this one of our most successful schools. 

Center Grammar. 

The Spring term of this school was taught by Miss A. 
E. Tucker who has been favorably mentioned in our pre- 



!J 

vious reports, as the teacher of the primary school. Miss 
T. performed her duties to the satisfaction of all interest- 
ed in the school, and was offered the position for another 
term but declined. 

The Fall term was taught by Rev. S. O. Dyer of 
Weston. This teacher has been educated for the work of 
teaching and is well qualified, though he had not taught 
for many years. The school made a fair degree of pro- 
gress under his management. He did not awaken the en- 
thusiasm and arouse the ambition of the scholars quite to 
the degree that we could have desired, but we have no 
doubt that, had he continued in charge of the school an- 
other term, he would have been successful to a more 
marked degree. Having secured a more lucrative position, 
in a neighboring town, he resigned. 

The winter term was taught by Miss S. J. Flint, a teach- 
er of ripe experience and marked ability. For several 
reasons this school promised to be one of the most difficult 
in town to manage. But Miss F. from the outset gave evi- 
dence of such aptitude for her work and devoted herself to 
it with such marked ability and held the reins of govern- 
ment with such a firm grasp that we consider her adminis- 
tration of the school the most successful of any in the win- 
ter term, since we have had the oversight of the school. 
The scholars showed their appreciation of her efforts to 
promote their welfare by the presentation of a fitting gift, 
at the close of the school. The examination was highly 
creditable to teachers and scholars. 

Centre Primary. 

This school was taught throughout the year by Miss S. 
F. Robbins. This was Miss R's first experience in teach- 
ing but she devoted herself to her work with such earn- 
estness of purpose and showed such a love for her pupils 
and was so patient with them where patience was required, 
that her success as a teacher was assured at the very com- 
mencement of her work. The school made a steadv pro- 
gress in attainment throughout the year. The teacher has 
proved herself very well qualified for the instruction of 
young scholars, which is the most difficult part of the teach- 
ers work. The scholars felt a personal attachment to the 
teacher which made it a pleasant duty for them to obey 
her and to receive the instruction which she was ready to 



10 

impart. The examination at the close of the winter term 
was very satisfactory. 

East School. 

This school was favored with the continued labors of 
Miss M. C. Harris. Miss II. devoted herself to her work 
with earnestness of purpose and was faithful to her trust. 
We consider her one of our most thorough and skillful 
•teachers. In the opinion of some of her scholars she may 
have seemed too strict in discipline, but, in our opinion, she 
was none too much so to keep in subjection elements which 
otherwise would have endangered the successof the school. 
The examination at the end of the winter term was exceed- 
ingly severe and proved the substantial character of the 
work which has been accomplished in the school. 

North School. 

The Spring term was taught by Miss E. F. Reed, a 
teacher who has been most favorably noticed in several 
reports in connection with this school. Miss Reed was 
obliged* to close her school prematurely by reason of failing 
health, and after a lingering sickness died. She was earn- 
est and conscientious in her chosen work, and was greatly 
beloved by all her pupils. We have no doubt those who 
were under her instructions will cherish her memery and 
will always feel the influence of her pure and devoted life. 

The Fall and Winter terms were taught by Miss L. A. 
Farnum. Miss F. was a resident of the district and for 
other reasons labored under some disadvantages during 
the first term, though she had a fair degree of success-. 
During the winter term the school made excellent progress 
and the examination at, the close of the term was very 
creditable. 

South East. 

% 

The Spring and Fall terms of this school were taught 
by Miss K. M. Sweeney. Miss S. is well qualified to 
teach and showed herself disposed to apply herself most 
earnestly to her work, but, through the influences of causes 
beyond her control, she failed to succeed. The Winter 
term was taught by Miss H. F. Hapgood. This was Miss 
H's first experience in teaching, but, considering the dis- 
advantages with which she was called to contend, she had 



11 



a good degree* of success. On account of removals from 
this part of the town, the prospective number of scholars 
in this school is to be small, that it may be, some provi- 
sion can be made so as to obviate the necessity for a school 
here during more than one term. Such an arrangement 
will be for the interest of the scholars and of tae town. 

Appended are the usual statistical reports. In the num- 
ber of visits reported, neither the visits of the Superintend- 
ent nor those of friends at the public examinations are re- 
ported. 

Respectfully Submitted. 

DANIEL TUTTLE, (Chairman) 

JONA. W. LOKER, (Clerk), 

JOSEPH NOYES, 

JAMES TUTTLE, 

DANIEL HARRIS, 

JOHN FLETCHER, 2nd, J 

F. P. WOOD, Superintendent of Schools 



School Con nil it tec 

of 

Acton. 



ROLL OF HONOR. 



Several scholars in the different district have been absent or tardy only 
once, and several have not been tardy or absent after they began to go to 
school, but did not go when the school began. We would gladly mention 
such, but by our rules we can not. 



Those who have not 
been tardy or absent 
for one term. 



Those who have not 
been tardy or absent 
for two terms. 



Those who have not 
been tardy or absent 
for three terms. 



South Grammar. 



Mary Phelan, 


Carrie Jones, 


Eddie Pool. 


Etta Temple, 


Jessie Mitchell, 




Ella Clark, 


Ida Wilder, 




Henrietta Sawyer, 


Hiram Gates, 




Arlon Jackson, 


Willie Wilbur. 




Freddie Brown, 






Lucie Jones, 









South Primary- 


, 


Mary I. Jackson, 


Josie Hannon, 


Harry Fletcher. 


Mary E. Haggerty, 


Emily G. Hannon, 




Mary F. Fletcher, 


Eda F. Shapley, 




Herbert 0. Willis, 


Eva C. Shapley. 




Willie S. Randall, 


Carrie L. Shapley, 




A. Ernie Wilbur, 


L. Gerty Clark. 




John Lynch. 







West Oraniiuar 



Emma Mead, 


l Etta Hoyi, 


Annie Blanchard, 


Lottie Iti chard son, 


1 Clara Tuttle, 


Lizzie Gates, 


Arthur Bradford, 


1 Mary Tuttle, 


Minnie Hart, 


Arthur Blanchard. 


; Inez Wyman, 


Hattie Parker, 


James Galliers, 


Freddie Holden, 


Freddie Mead. 


Edgar Hall, 


Willie Kelley, 




Charlie Hopkins, 


Georgie Mead. 




Arthur Stevens. 







West Primary. 



Millie Handley, 


Freddie Gil more, 




Eugene Hall, 


Walter Gardner, 




Eddie Hoar, 


Willie Hart, 




Willie Hopkins, 


Ida Littlefield, 




David Kingsley, 


Bertie Mead, 




Florence Noyes, 


Ida Tuttle, 




Clesson Parker, 


Frank Teel. 




Eddie Parker. 







13 

Center Grammar. 



Herbert Fisk, 
Willie Kingsley, 
Walter Richardson, 
Willie Richardson, 
James Tuttle. 



Susie E. Con ant. 
Elbridge E. Conant, 

Edith S. Dunn, 
Lizzie M. Scofield. 
Etta Tuttle. 
Hattie Tuttle, 
Harry L. Tuttle, 



Annie Hammond, 
Viola Tuttle. 



Center Primary. 



George A. Smith. 



Sarah E. Hammond. 



East School. 



Alma Forbush, 
William J. Moore. 
George L. Robbins. 
George H. Robbins. 



, Carlton C. Conant, 
; Florence B. Perkins, 
Willie O. Smith. 



North School. 



Marv Dailv. 


Willie 


Butterfield. 


Elma Rouillard, 


Ehvin Harris, 






James Ryan, 


Cora Rouillard , 






Mattie Smith. 


Willie Ryan. 








Hattie Smith , 








Bertie Smith, 








Everett Wayne, 








Carrie White, 








Sidney White, 









South East School. 



Lester Fletcher. 
John Jones, 
Ethel J. Mathews. 



TABULAR VIEW. 











'*: a> 


e 


q 


>>of 


SCHOOLS. 


TEACHERS. 


o 
o 

.c . 
O m 
G0XJ 

'<-. fl 
O O 

-9 


a 
o 

2 

h 


o 

Qi 

so 


o 
a 

o 
g 

o 
o 


S. 
si 


a> . 

(»■ c 
o 

(4 •'■ 


2 o 






5 d 

(i 

o 


o 
bo 

« 




to 
a 
u 

V 

> 

< 


1 * 

a •"> 
55 


a > 






Spring Term. 






1 

i 








Center. \ grammar, 


Miss A. E. Tucker, 


2 


$3G 00 


27 22 2 





2 


5 


y ( Primary, 


" S. P. Robbing, 


5J 


25 OU 


34 


28.9 


2 





8 


WpKt $ Grammar, 
west. $ primary, 


" A. 11. Allen, 




44 00 


36 


31.3 





6 


18 


" O. A. Hopkins, 


4 


40 00 


35 


80 


2 





34 


South S Grammar, 
south. j Primary, 


" E. A. Gordon, 


a 


40 00 


40 


36 





9 


5 


" M. A. Forbush, 


3 


40 00 


49 


42.75 


1 


1 


29 


North. 


" E. F. Reed, , 


15 


32 00 


21 


15.8 


1 


1 


7 


East. 


" M. C. Harriss, 


» 


30 00 


23 


20.9 





2 


9 


South Eaet. 


" K. M. Sweeny, 
Totals, 


h 


30 00 


19 


14.8 








4 




20? 


$317 00 


284 


242 65 





21 


119 




Fall Term. 
















rvnfpr * Grammar, 
Centu. n > rimary) 


Rev. S. 0. Dyer, 


2 


$40 00 


29 


23.9 







2 


Miss S. F. Robbins, 


2 


27 00 


34 


29.5 


3 





12 


Wpst ) Grammar, 
\Y est. | primary, 


" A. H. Allen, 


2 


44 00 


43 


38 





11 


21 


" O. A. Houkins, 


24 


40 00 


30 


32 


2 





10 


South Grammar, 
South. j Primary, 


" E. A. Gordon, 


21 


40 00 


47 


40.6 





10 


4 


" M. A. Forbush, 


3 


40 ©0 


43 


38.8 


1 








North. 


" L. A. Farnum, 


n 


28 00 


2") 


19 


1 


1 


12 


East. 


" M. C. Harriss, 


2* 


: J ti 00 


20 


1G.8 





2 


1 


South East. 


" K. M. Sweeney, 
Totals, 


u 


30 00 


13 


10.2 













204 


$325 00 


200 


248.8 


7 


27 


68 




Winter Term. 
















j'^„f«.. S Grammar, 
Center. {p rim ary, 


Miss S. J. Flint, 


4 


$40 00 


34 


29.5 





98 


23 


" S. F. Robbins. 


4 


32 50 


4: 


35.5 





1 


19 


W pst S Grammar, 
west. ( Primar y > 


" A. H. Allen, 


3 


44 00 


40 


35.3 





18 


30 


" 0. A. Hopkins, 


3 


40 Oft 


47 


40 





1 


20 


c:~.,»v, < Grammar, 
south. j ^imary, 


" E. A. Gordo. , 


3 


40 00 


4S 


38.6 





10 


22 


" M. A. Forbush, 


n 


40 00 


3.', 


29.3 








18 


North. 


" L. A. Farnum, 


36 00 


10 


15.5 





4 


21 


East, 


'* M. C. Harriss, 


3 


40 00 


23 


19.2 





5 


10 


South East. 


'• H. F. Hapgood, 

Totals, 

Aggregate for the year. 


J__ 


36 00 


16 


12.5 





2 


7 




S8J 


$34S 50 


300 


255.4 





07 


170 




694 


$900 5() 


S74 


746.85 


13 


115 


957 



Totai average percentage of attendance during the year, 85.4 



FINANCIAL I\EPOI\T, 



SOUTH SCHOOL. 




Drawn from the treasury, 


$688 38 


Received from town of Stow, 


16 00 


u for grass, 


1 50 


Balauce from last year, 


204 73 


Paid teachers, 


$680 00 


" for coal and teaming the same, 


52 49 


11 " care of house and furnace, 


47 70 


Balance on hand, 


130 42 



$910 61 



$910 61 
JAMES TUTTLE, Committee. 

WEST SCHOOL. 



Drawn from the treasury, 
Balance from last year, 



$644 88 


40 


14 


$607 


00 


55 


00 


23 


02 



$685 02 



Paid teachers, 
" for fuel, 

" care of house, &c, 

$685 02 

JOSEPH NOYES, Committee. 

CENTER SCHOOL. 

Drawn from the treasury, 
Balance •* last year, 

Paid to teachers, 

" for fuel, 

u " care of house, 

" u incidentals, 
"Balance on hand, 

DANIEL TUTTLE, Committee. 



$640 00 




88 71 






$728 71 


$546 00 


57 19 




30 00 




7 80 




87 72 






^7->K 71 



16 

NORTH SCHOOL. 

Drawn from the treasury, 
Balance from last year, 

Paid to teachers, 

" for fuel, teaming it, &c, 

" " care of house, &c, 
Balauce on hand. 



$263 80 


5 34 


$218 00 


42 C5 


7 40 


1 15 



$269 20 



$269 20 
JONATHAN W. LOKER, Committee. 

EAST SCHOOL. 



Drawn from the treasury, S298 34 

Balance " last year, 6 14 



$251 


4f> 


42 


08 


10 


95 



$304 48 



Paid to teachers, 

" for fuel, and drawing and preparing 
" " care of house. &c, 

$304 48 

DANIEL HARRIS, Committee. 
SOUTH EAST SCHOOL. 
Drawn from the treasury, S'2jo 86 

Balance " last year, 1 02 

$256 86 

Paid to teachers, 
" for fuel, 
" " care of house. 
" " incidentals. 

Balance on hand. 

$256 86 

JOHN FLETCHER, 2nd, Committek. 
Amount of money raised by the town, $2,500 00 

Income from the State School fund. 206 35 

" " " Dog fund. 190 08 



S228 00 


18 00 


9 25 


1 25 


38 



Total. $2,896 43 



Number of children reported by the assessors between the ages of 
five and fifteen, 285. 

Sum appropriated by the town, for each scholar, $8 77. 



REPORTS 



SELECTMEN AND OTHER OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON, 



FKOM 



FEB. 26, 1876, TO FEB. 26, 1877, 



INCLUDING THE 



Manages, Bii'tlis ai\d Dekt^l ii\ 1§^6, 



ALSO, THE 



Report of the School Committee, 



ACTON : 

PlilNTED AT THE OFFICE OF THE ACTON PATRIOT, SOUTH ACTON. 

1877. 



Selectmen's Report. 



APPROPRIATIONS AND 


RECEIPTS. 


Unexpended balance of last year, 


$6,922 


69 


Regular Town Grant, 


8,000 


00 


Town Grant for Schools, 


2,500 


00 


Town Grant for Highways, 


2,000 


00 


Overlay on Taxes, 


396 


55 


Corporation Tax, 


345 


85 


National Bank Tax, 


416 


62 


State Aid to Jan. 1, 1876, 


164 


94 


State School Fund, 


193 


76 


Mt. Hope Cemetery, 


7 


00 


Woodlawn Cemetery, 


60 


00 


Dog Fund, 


225 


72 


Use of Town Hall and Cellar, 


45 


12 


State Tax, 


1,296 


00 


County Tax, 


452 


27 


Liquor Licenses, 


300 


00 


Cash of J. E. Billings, 


600 


00 


" : ' James 0. Faxon, 


450 


00 


" " Harriet Davis, 


500 


00 


" '"'- Old School House West Dist 


. 630 


00 


'* -< Old Iron, Davis Monument. 1 * 




60 


" " Poll Tax of Lewis Tuttle, 


2 


00 

*^5 509 


EXPENDITURES. 


,p-(J)(^Ut' 


SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 




Paid C. A. Harrington, South District, 1742 


14 


S. W. Hopkins, West 


697 


33 



12 



Luther Coftant, Centre " 692 31 

D. J. Wetherbee, East " 323 84 

J. W. Loker, North " 323 84 

John Fletcher, 2nd, So. East Dist .140 00 



12,919 46 



REPAIRS ON SCHOOL HOUSES. 

Paid Joseph Noyes, for repairs on School 

house, West Dist. 1875 and 1876, S4 00 



Paid Joseph Noyes, incidentals 1875 and 

1876, West District, $14 07 

William B. Davis, for painting East 

School House, 12 00 

William B. Davis, for Paint and Oil, 19 24 
Luther Conant, for one Stove and 

repairs on two, for Centre District, 42 84 
S. W. Hopkins, West District, 2 

locks, I 00 

" u for repairs on School 

House, 3 12 

" for r e pa i r son 

Furnace. 6 25 

u u one Coal Hod. 85 

C. A. Harrington, for Stove and 
and Pipe for So. 
District, 40 00 

•' " for one Coal Hod 

and Shovel, 1 20 

" " for whitewashing 

rooms, 2 75 





BOOKS AM) PRIMIM 






c. w. 


Leach. 500 Selectmen's 








Report, : 


$16 


00 


tfc 


500 Town Reports. 


70 


00 


u 


Warrants, 


7 


00 


i I 


Dog Notices, 


1 


50 


i I 


Notice sale of School 








House, 


1 


25 


a 


Notice road to build, 


2 


00 


.. 


Blank Orders, 


1 


25 


Tax book for J. E. Cutter, 


2 


00 



REPAIRS OX HIGHWAYS. 

Paid Aaron S. Fletcher, for repairing 

stone bridge near Powder Mills, 8185 00 

J. E. Billings, for lumber and re- 
pairing bridge near Wetherbee's 
Mills. 141 48 

American Powder Company, for 

repairing washouts, 228 50 



*147 32 



6101 00 



Paid American Powder Company, for 

temporary repairs on bridge, $28 21 
Charles Wheeler, for repairing 
washout near 



C. N. McLane's 






Mill, 


41 


14 


" ' 4 n e a r Andrew 






Hapgood's house, 
" near J. W. 


27 


25 


Wheelers house 


,27 


87 


J. E. Reed, lumber for new 






bridge at Powder Mills, 


93 


8J 


A. H. Jones, for building new 






bridge at Powder 






Mills, 


160 


06 


u lumber for railings, 


8 


00 


breaking roads in 






April, 187(5, 


11 


81 


" repairing roads in 
Jan., Feb. and 






March, 1876. 


21 


70 


" repairing washouts 
near the houses of 






Luke Hapgood, 
Cyrus Hay ward, 
T. P. Sawyer and 
Cyrus Barker, 


80 


01 


Antonie Bullette, breaking roads 






17 hours in 1875, 


3 


40 


J. W. Wheeler, for 40 loads gravel, 


1 


20 


Luke Hapgood, for 187 " 


5 


61 



REGULAR HIGHWAY WORK. 



Paid Charles Wheeler, for 73 1-4 days 






work, 3.00, 


6219 


75 


for 66 1-4 days 






work, 1.50, 


99 


37 


James Waldren, for 67 1-1 days 






work, 1.50, 


100 


87 


R. Williams, for 69 1-4 days work, 


103 


87 


James Morris, for 73 1-2 lt 


110 


25 



$1,065 05 



Paid Thos.Clifford, for 9 3-4 days work, $14 62 

William Ryan (boy) 12 hours, 1 00 
Charles Leighton, for 5 1-2 days 

work, 8 25 

L. Bullette, for 2 days work, 3 00 

Luther Conant, for 2 days work, 3 00 

Thomas Owen, " 1 t; ' " 1 50 

A. H. Jones, " 1 " « 3 00 

" oxen " 1 " « 2 00 

'• horse for 1 1-2 days work, 2 25 
Chas. Wheeler, horse, for 124 3-4 

days work. 187 12 
oxen, for 63 1-2 

days, 2.00; 127 00 

" " repairing tools, 7 94 



DANIEL WETHERBEE, SURVEYOR. 

Paid Silas Conant, Jr., for 9 davs 

work, 150, 813 50 

Daniel Harris, for 6-10 days work, 90 

Geo. Ross, for 5 7-20 u " 8 03 

C. Hardy, " 4 1-2 " " 1.20,5 40 

Abel Farrar, for 6 " " 1.50, 9 00 
Daniel Wetherbee horse, for 

24 1-20 day work, 36 07 

J. E. Billings, for 9 6-10 days work, 14 40 



ABRAM H. JONES, SURVEYOR. 

Paid Abram H. Jones, for 72 8-10 days 



work, 3.00, 






218 40 


Henry Lewis, for 54 1-2 


days 


work, 




1.50, 






81 75 


L. Bullette, < ; 37 


n 


a 


55 50 


L. A. Jones, " 65 1-5 


a 


a 


97 80 


C. Fletcher, < : 2 


a 


u 


3 00 


Chas. Leigh ton/' 3 


a 


tt 


4 50 


Luther Billings," 2 


tt 


a 


3 00 


F. Mann, " 2 


a 


a 


3 00 


E. N. Robbins, " 1 


iC 


a 


1 50 



8904 79 



$87 30 



Paid A. H. Jones, oxen, for 51 days 

work, 2.00, " $102 00 

horse, for 79 2-3 days 
work, 1.50, 119 50 

Repairing Tools, 3 80 

Luther Billings, horse, for 2 days 

work, 3 00 



8696 75 



BY ORDER OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS. 

Paid Charles Wheeler, for building 

road to North Acton depot. " $211 23 



Charles Wheeler, for building 

road near A. Hapgood's. 50 50 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 

Paid E. II. Cutler, oxen for town farm, 8205 00 
J. E. Cutter, deficiency on town 

farm, as per report of Overseers 

of the Poor to April 1, 1876, 365 15 
E. H. Cutler, for support of — 

Nancy Chaffin, 

Clara Wheeler, 

Sarah B. Childs, 

Sarah Hunt, 

Patrick Sullivan. 

Ida Pike, 

Geo. E. Curton, 

Joseph Whitney, 

Geo. J. Dole, 

John A. Childs, 

Mary A. Priest, 

Martin Pike, 

Trainor Family, 124 01 

E. H. Cutler, two journeys to 

Watertown respecting W. F. 

B. Whitney, 4 00 

E. H. Cutler, journey to Boston, 

respecting Mary A. Priest and 

others, 3 00 

E. H. Cutler, journey to Concord 

respecting Mrs. Trainor, 1 00 



25 


00 


116 


85 


20 


22 


5 


00 


7 


86 


22 


00 


6 


50 


2 


75 


1 


82 


2 


00 



3 82 
5 69 



8261 73 



Paid Dr. Isaiah Hutchins, for medical 

attendance in Trainor family, $29 35 



|TOWN DEBT; 




Paid Geo. S. Reed, Note, 


8450 00 


John Goldsmith, u 


2,500 00 


Phineas Puffer, " 


^3,000 00 


John Vilson, " 


500 00 


Oliver Whitcomb," 


500 00 


Simon Tuttle, " 


GOO 00 


Geo. Harris, (endorsed on note), 


100 00 


STATE AID. 




Paid Rebecca C. Wright, 


848 00 


llattie W. Wilder, 


48 00 


R. H. L. Talcott, 


60 00 


CEMETERY EXPENSES. 


Paid John Fletcher, Jr., for Woodlawn 




Cemetery, 
Charles B. Stone, for Mt. Hope 


166 01 


Cemetery, 


88 36 


LAW SLITS. 




Paid G. A. Somerby, Reed's case, Su- 




perior Court, 
G. A. Somerby, Reed's case, Su- 
preme Judicial Court, 


8310 00 
190 00 


W. N. Mason, Reed's case, Supe- 




rior Court, 


250 00 


Geo. Hay ward, Reed's case, Su- 
perior Court, 
J. E. Billings, ten journeys to 


200 00 


Boston, for four terms of court 




in Reed's case, 


25 00 


H. J. Hapgood, five journeys to 
Boston, in Reed's case, 


12 50 


Witnesses, 


17 50 



8951 02 



87,650 00 



8156 00 



8254 37 



81,005 00 



TOWN OFFICERS. 

Paid F. P. Wood, Superintendent of 

Schools, $90 00 

Phineas Wetherbee, services as 

Assessor, 25 00 

Aaron C. Handley, services as 

Assessor, 1875, 23 50 

Aaron C. Handley, services as 

Assessor, 1876, " 25 00 

W. D. Tuttle, services as Assessor, 25 00 
f* k4 Town 

Clerk, including making report, 25 00 
R. L. Reed, for sealing weights 



and measures, 




15 00 


J. E. Cutter, for collecting 
J. E. Billings, services a3 


taxes, 
Select- 


70 00 


man, 




67 00 


H. J. Hapgood, services as 
man, 


Select- 


50 00 


Frank H. Whitcomb, services as 




Selectman, 


N NOTI 


43 00 


INTEREST O 


:s. 


Paid J. K. Putney, 
Charles Morris, 




40 51 
21 00 


Frederick Rouillard, 




150 00 


George S. Reed, 




15 67 


Middlesex Institute for Sa\ 


ings, 


210 00 


John F. Nickles, 




100 51 


John Goldsmith, 




148 33 


Phineas Puffer, 




248 75 


Lewis Rouillard, 




12 00 


Elizabeth Hanscom, 




40 80 


Daniel Harris, 




48 00 


I. T. Flagg, 




12 14 


Joseph Barker, 
Mary P. Hosmer, 




60 00 
60 00 


Joseph Noyes, 
John Wilson, 




12 00 
21 16 


David M. Handley, 
C. E. Miller, 




180 00 
45 00 


J. E. Billings, 




90 96 



-$458 50 



10 



Paid Calvin Harris, 

Jonathan A. Piper, 
Harriet Davis. 
Luther Billings, 
Patrick Farrell, 
George H. Harris, 
Sarah C. Noves, 
T. F. NoyesI 
Oliver Drew. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid H. M. Smith, repairing town clock, $1 50 
Daniel Wetherbee, road scraper 

and plate, 50 00 

J. E. Billings, adjusting vane rod 

on Town Hall, 13 35 

Damon, Smith & Co., expenses 

lighting road while repairing bridge 

near the Powder Mills, 5 00 

Charles Wheeler, grading around 

North school house, 67 10 

Charles Wheeler, grading around 

West school house, 86 18 

F. M. Lund, repairing Davis Mon- 
ument, 

Julian Tattle, repairing Monument, 

G. W. Livermore, u " 
Geo. E. Forbush, " 
Francis Conant, t: " 
For celebration July 4th, 1870, 
A. L. Brooks, lumber for fence 

around North school house, 79 97 

J. E. Billings, labor, nails and 

freight for same, 47 22 

D. J. Wetherbee, coal for Town 

Hall, 24 75 

Geo. Stevens & Co., repairing 

Town Clock, 7 ^') 

H. J. liapgood, freight on road 

scraper, 
C. B. Stone, making deed of old 

school house land, 1 00 



$12 


00 






30 


GO 






30 


00 






24 


00 






93 


00 






9 


28 






48 


00 






24 


00 






36 


00 










$1,829 


11 



<s 


15 


4 


00 


3 


15 


6 


00 


26 


75 


25 


71 



2 11 



11 



Paid Edward Tuttlc, use of pump for 

Centre school, two years, $5 ( )() 

J. E. Cutter, discount on taxes, 76, 770 33 
u '* express on bundle, 30 

" ' : key to closet in Town 

Hall, 25 

" " summoning persons 

to take oath of office, 3 75 
A. E. Gates, opening Town Hall, 

21 times, ' 14 00 

" one day's labor on 

Town Clock, 1 50 

washing Town Hall, 2 00 

" 6 lamp chimneys. 75 

'• repairs on lamps. 65 

" repairing clock in 

Town Hall. 2 08 

" sawing wood and 

putting in cellar, 1 50 

u Lime, 10 

tolling bell for 4 deaths, 80 
" taking care of Town 

clock one year. 10 00 

W. D. Tuttle, express on public 

documents, 2 97 

" surveying and re- 

newing bounds 
of North school 
house lot. 1 00 

" postage jn election 

returns. 01 

" journey to Concord 

to make out elec- 
tion certificate, 1 50 
" collecting and re- 
cording 28 births, 14 00 
" recording 31 deaths, 5 10 
" u 16 marriages, 2 40 
Joseph Noyes, damage to sleigh, 3 50 
Francis Dwight, attending funerals 

of 20 persons, 78 00 
" " making returns of 

29 deaths, 7 25 



12 



Paid J. E. Billings, journey to Boston, 

respecting State Aid,$2 50 
" fc: stationery and postage, 2 75 

;t " express on money to 

pay note, 1 50 



Unexpended balance as per report of 


»X,JHJ >JV 


Feb. 26, 1876, 


#6,922 69 


Appropriations and Receipts, 


18,586 43 




ffljOC kA() -jo 




, 4P^<J,c>v« 7 \.Zd 


Support of Schools, 


#2,919 46 


Repairs on School Houses, 


147 32 


• ( " Highways, 


1,065 05 


Regular highway work, 


1,778 84 


By order of County Commissioners, 


261 73 


Books and Printing, 


101 00 


Support of Poor, 


951 02 


Town Debt, 


7,650 00 


State Aid, 


156 00 


Cemetery Expenses, 


254 37 


Town Officers, 


458 50 


Law Suits, 


1,005 00 


Interest on Town Debt, 


1,829 11 


Miscellaneous, 


1,395 58 


State Tax, 


1,296 00 


County do. 


452 27 




fljOl 791 OC 




•JT— J-, • —J- ***J 



Balance in Treasury Feb. 26, 1877, $3,787 87 

TOWN DEBT NOTES. 

Daniel Harris, $819 46 

Elizabeth Hanscom, 699 72 

Isaac T. Flagg, 105 43 

Calvin Hams, 202 70 

James A. Billings, 202 70 

Harriet Davis, 506 41 

Jonas K. Putney, 686 94 

Joseph Barker, 517 16 

Lewis Rouillard, 204 40 

Joseph Noyes, 205 16 

Jonathan A. Piper, 205 16 

Luther Billings, 202 86 



13 



David M. Handley, 
J. E. Billings, 
Patrick Farrell, 
Joseph Barker, 
Jonathan A. Piper, 
James 0. Faxon, 
George II . Harris, 
Frederick Rouillard. 
Charles Morris, 
Sarah C. Noyes, 
Thomas F. Noyes, 
Mary P. Hosmer, 
Oliver Drew, 
Charles E. Miller, 
John F. Nickles, 



Middlesex Institution for Savings, 
J. E. Billing*, 

Patrick Farrell, 

Amount due from State Aid. 

" " " Town Treasurer 

Balance against the Town, 



83,046 


50 


609 


00 


1,156 


90 


502 


16 


404 


66 


468 


00 


100 


00 


2,606 


66 


367 


09 


800 


00 


400 


00 


1,039 


33 


632 


60 


TIT 


T5 


514 


00 


608 


60 


295 


88 


3,550 


16 


419 


88 


512 


00 


413 


80 




$24,083 07 



$208 
3,787 



00 

87 



JAMES E. BILLINGS, 
HIRAM J. HAPGOOD, 
FRANK H. WHITCOMB, 



83,995 87 
$20,087 20 

) Selectmen 

( of 
\ Acton. 



Acton, Feb. 26, 187 



14 
REPORT OF THE 

RECEIPTS and EXPENDITURES 

AT THE ALMSHOUSE IN ACTON, 
For the Year Ending April 1st, 1877. 



ARTICLES IN HAM) APRIL 1, 187 7. 




13 Cows, 


1650 


00 6 bbls. apples, 


.$7 50 


1 Horse, 


150 


00 35 barrels, 


4 50 


8 tons Hay, 


160 


00 Turnips, 


1 00 


Meal, 


1 


25 20 gallons soap, 


3 50 


50 bush. Corn, 


37 


50 08 lbs. lard, 


11 50 


1000 lbs. shorts. 


7 


50 3 gallons boil cider, 


1 50 


Grass seed, 


■) 


50 108 lbs. ham, 


16 00 


Nails, 




SO 300 lbs. salt pork, 


42 00 


2 shoats, 


24 


00 Salt pickles, 


1 00 


26 hens, 


13 


00 Cabbages, 


1 00 


12 cords wood cut for 




1-2 bbl. vinegar. 


4 00 


stove, 


60 


00 1-2 bbl. crackers, 


1 75 


Lumber, 


16 


00 15 lbs. dried apples, 


1 50 


8 market boxes, 


1 


20 Oil, 


1 00 


100 bush, potatoes, 


so 


00 2 1-4 bush, barley, 


2 25 






$1,304 81 


RECEIPTS FROM TOWN FARM 187 7. 




Received for apples, 


$278 78 Received for use of 




poultry, 


1 


25 wagon, 


ti 50 


milk, 


85:5 


02 turnips, 


50 


cow, 


32 


00 slabs, 


1 00 


potatoes. 


, 13 


90 windows, 


00 


oxen, 


180 


00 labor, 


1 00 


pork, 


15 


57 Bowker 




eggs, 


r> 


86 fund, 


12 00 


flour, 


2 


48 Received from the State 


calves, 


21 


48 for Joel Stone, 


24 00 


hprrips! 





00 




Uvl i. ICO* 




81, 


,453 20 



15 





EXPENSES. 




Paid for labor, 


$159 77 Paid for use of horse, $4 25 


grain, 


848 29 


expenses mar- 


pigs, 


39 00 


keting, 7 40 


flour, 


64 62 


cultivator, 4 25 


oxen, 


105 00 


repairing harness, 80 


oat & rye m 


eal, 5 07 


blacksmith bill,10 96 


tea, 


18 95 


lantern, 57 


sugar, 


84 62 


sawing lumber, 4 02 


crackers, 


25 46 


castings, 2 44 


meat. 


(\P> 06 


express bill, 25 


beans, 


5 47 


keeping cow?, 63 00 


creara tartar 


, 4 05 


saltpetre, 2 7 


butter, 


58 44 


raisens, 88 


molasses, 


11 80 


oranges, 27 


salt, 


4 28 


nails, 1 09 


pepper, 


24 . 


chocolate, 28 


oil, 


10 ID 


lamp chimneys, 84 


tobacco, 


4 68 


lime, 10 


fish, 


6 16 


vinegar, 6 75 


oil can, 


50 


mustard, 85 


sage, 


50 


tomato plants, 80 


medicine. 


2 78 


tacks, 80 


coffee, 


^ 


pins, 41 


cheese, 


10 36 


seeds, 1 04 


cloth & clothing, 8 87 


candles, 60 


curtains, 


m 


twine, 84 


dried apple 


2 99 


brooms, 80 


lemons, 


40 


jugs, 76 


phosphate, 


12 28 


ginger, 10 


shoes, 


1 12 


wicks, 16 


scythes, 


2 00 


cow, ir> 00 


stone, 


20 


use of plough, 1 00 


soap, 


96 


hay, 6 6H 


onions, 


2 75 


wringer, 6 00 


saleratus, 


1 36 


stove, 7 00 


yeast, 


56 


lard, 12 91 


spices, 


1 20 


hops, 25 


snuff, 


86 


crockery, '.is 


barrels, 


40 24 


brick, ' 10 


ladders, 


2 50 


matches, (10 


cake board, 


25 


rice, 75 


cider, 


3 76 


pail. 28 



lb 



Paid for yarn, 82 93 Paid for coffin & robe for 

filing saws, 75 Joel Stone, $13 00 

repairing shoes, 1 00 stationery, 1 00 







$1,254 02 


E. Tuttle, journey to Concord, 


1 50 




Dr. Barrett's bill for Michael Murrey, 


10 00 




Dr. Sanders' " " i: u 


48 00 




" " " " Nellie Batchelor, 


8 00 




" u iL " Joel Stone, 


2 25 




Services of N. S. Brooks, 


387 00 




" " E. H. Cutler as Overseer, 


50 00 




" John White, 


8 00 ' 




" " Thomas P. Sawyer. 


3 00 




Total amount of Expenditures, 




$1,766 77 


" " w ' Receipts, 




1,458 JO 


Drawn from Treasury to balance, 


8343 57 




Interest on Farm, 


240 00 





8553 57 



Victualing 410 Tramps, 8205 00 



Cost of supporting Poor on the Farm. 8848 57 

Whole number of persons, exclusive of Tramps, supported 
in Almshouse, 9 ; average number, 6 1-3 ; present number, 6. 

ELISHA H. CUTLER. ) Overseers 
JOHN WHITE, of 

THOMAS P. SAWYER. ) Poor. 

Acton, April 1, 1877. 



17 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT FOR 1876. 

Births in Acton, 1876. 

No. Date of birth. Name of child. Names of parents 

1. Feb. 2, Buddie Warren Davis, son of John and Elizabeth Davi . 

2. Feb. !T, John Manion. son of Thomas and Mary A. Manion. 

3. Feb. 23, Fred Loring Baldwin, son of Loring C. and Ella S. Baldwin. 

4. Mar. 18, Shirley Edward Jones, son of William S. and Laura A. Jones. 

5. Mar. 25, Eerbert William Owens, son of Thomas P. and Eliza J. <)\ 
<>. Mar, 26, Charles Edwin Nelson, son of Oscar and Mary Ann Nelson. 
T. April 18, George Parker, son of George L. and Fanny Parker. 

8. May 4, Elizabeth Lenore Forbush, daughter of George E. and A 

R. Forbush. 

9. May 7, Mabel Viola Mead, daughter of Willis L. and Julia A. Mead. 
in. ■■ to, Mary Josephine Coulter, daughter of James and Elizabeth 

Coulter. 

11. •• 23, Walter Everett Smith, son of Allen and Georgianna Smith. 

12. '• 23, Mary Ellen O'Neil, daughter of Patrick and Hannah oWeil. 
L3. .Inn 3, Arthur Leland Staple-,, son of Charles !i. and Esabella C. 

Staples. 

14. Jul\ !i, Mary Catherine Parker, daughter of Edwin C. and Hannah H. 

Parker. 

15. •• 20, Guy Preston Littlefield, son of Hanson A. and Florence M. 

Littlefield. 

16. Aug. 27, Ethel May Baker, daughter of George M. and Nellie E. Baker. 
IT. Aug. 31, Ethel Viola Handlev, daughter of Reuben and Caroline M. 

Handley. 
;•>. S "i . !i, Bertram S. Holt, son of Lorenzo IT. and Clara E. 11 

19. " 19, Eva H. Bandall, daughter of Freeman L. and Amelia A. Ran- 

dall. 

20. Oct. 7, Wilmot Emery Taylor, son of Moses Emery and Clara Taylor. 

21. " 3i », Harry Dwight Jenkins, son of Henry A. and Sarah A. Jenkins. 

22. No\ . i. Arthur Guy Knowlton, son of George T, and < llara E. Knowlton. 
2d. •• 2, dames Richardson, son of J, ones E. and Sara R. Richardson. 

24. '• 17, Cornelius Joseph Minehan, son of Patrick and Ellen Minehan. 

25. Dec. 5, Arthur Drew, son of Hiram L. and Ella L. Drew. 

2<5. " 7, Jessie Hayward Jones, daughter of Samuel •'ir. and Emma E. 
Jones. 

27. '" 25, Wendell F. Davis, son of Ebenezer and Minnie S. Davis. 

28. " 30, Charles Benry Wilson, son of Robert and Mary Ann Wilson. 

.Males. 19; females, 9; total, 28. 

The Town Clerk would request anyone noticing any omission i in the 
above : ; : to reporl the same at his office that they may he put noon record. 

Kffstrria$?es Recorded in Actoai sib 1$7<>. 

No. Date of marriage. Names of the parties. 

1. dan. 2, Mr. Jerome Dwinells and Miss Mary L. Davidson, both of Stow. 

2. ■* 4, Mr. Herbert S. Lane of Taunton and Miss Harriot A. Harris of 

Acton. 
:'.. " 15, Mr. George E. Forbush of Acton and Miss Annie R. Goulding 
of Boston. 

4. Feb. 2, Mr. Robert Wayne of Acton and Miss Lizzie A. Kemp of Rich- 

ford, Vt. 

5. April L9, Mr. Theodore P. Goding of Sudbury and Miss Ella F. Griggs of 

Acton. 
('». Ma\ d, Mr. Augustus I>. Libby and Miss Cora A. Bolbrook, both of 
Mavnard. 



18 

7. July l, Mr. John Fitagerald and Miss Mary Ellen Vansten both of Acton. 
S. " d, Mr. George II. Watson of Maynard and Miss Edith A. Knowl- 
ton of Acton. 

9. An-. 8, Mr. Sidney E. Home of Watertown and Miss Nelly H. Hall of 

Acton. 

10. " IT, Mi-. Augustus Fletcher and Miss Ida M. Hay ward, both of Acton. 

11. Sept. 26, Mr. George W. Cheney of Acton and Miss Alice Hughes of 

Boston. 

12. Oct. 10, Mr. Henry A. Harrison and Mis-. Lizzie .!. Sparks, both of 

Maynard. 

13. " 25, Mr. diaries E. Worcester of Concord and Miss Louise S. Barker 

of Acton. 

14. Nov. 80, Mr. Norman Chaplin of Fitchburg aad Miss Mary L. Romans. 
!"). " ;lo, Mr. ( li. . »s I. Miller and Miss L. Lizzie Keyes, both ol Acton. 
16. Dec. i:'». Mr. Charles ( '. Wetherbee and Miss Mary Emma Perkins, both 

of Acton. 

Deaths in Acton in 1S?<>. 

No. Date of death. Names and ages of the deceased. 

1. Jan. 8, Mrs. Sally Moore, aged 82. years, 9 months, 2:} days. 

2. " 8, Mrs. Mary J. Rhodes, aged 2d years, 7 months, 4 days. 

:;. •• 10, Mr. Franz W. Knowlton, aged 24 years, 8 month:. 17 days. 

4. •• 28, Mrs. charlotte White. aged*84 years, 4 months. 

5. "• 24, Mr. Lewis Gates, aged 62 years, 1 month, 5 days. 
•• 26, Mrs. Fanny Blodgett, ageil 67 years. 

7. Feb. 8, Mrs. Ann Madhouse, aged 48 years, 11 months, 25 da> . 
12. Mrs. Mary J. Johnson, aged 2d years, 10 months, 22 day . 
10, Ida Josephine Beck, daughter of John ft. and Harriel II. Beck, 
aged I year, 1 month, 10 days. 
K). •' 20, Mr. Roscoe Weston, aged 28 years, 10 months. 7 day-, 
il. Mar. 0, Mrs. Mary W. Earris, wife of Mi-. .John Hams, aged (>8 years, 

8 months, 25 days. 
12. •• 14, Mr. William Madhouse, aged 89 years. 
id. •• 80, Mrs. Margarel E. Hoyt, aged 89 years. 

14. Apr. 0, "Mrs. Rhoda, wife of Mr. William Wheeler, aged 60 rears, 

8 davs. 

15. •' 28, Mr. Joel R. Stone, aged 54 yews, 2 months, i; days. 

16. May 10, Mr. Hugh Trainor, aged 40 years. 

l i. June 8, Mrs. Eliza T. Soper, aged 68 years, 5 months, s days. 
is. July Id, Francis P.. son of Thomas N. and Maria M. Chase, died in 
Jonesborough, Tenu., aged 8 months, 25 days, 

19. '" 18, Mr. Amos Cutter, aged 88 years, 7 months. 

20. An sr. 1. Mr. Oliver W. Drew. M. I)'., aged 78 years. 

21. •• 6, Julia Callehan. daughter of Daniel and Ellen CaUehau. aged J 

year, 6 months. 

22. " 14. Mr. Edwin Hosmer, aged 52 years. 

28. Sept. l. Mrs. Eliza, widow of Elnathan Jones, aged 70 year-. 1 month, 
27 da\ s. 

24. " ti, Mrs. Mary Collins, aged 46 years. 

25. '• 18, Mr. Samuel T. Adams, aged 79years, 5 months. 17 davs. 

26. Oct. 10, Elizabeth F. Trainor, daughter of Hugh and Hannah Trainor, 

aged 4 years, lo months. 20 days. 

27. " 2-'), Philip Fehan, son of .John and Elizabeth Felian, aged 2 years, 

7 months. Id da\ B. 

28. Nov. •'!, Elizabeth M. Fehan, daughter of John and Elizabeth Fehan. aged S 

') years. 10 months. 22 days. 

29. •' 10, Mrs. Susan, wife of Abel Forbush, aged 76 years. 7 months 10 

days. 
80. " 2o, Mr. Ithamar Parker, aged 78 years. 
31. " 28, Mrs. Mary W. Bobbins, aged 88 years, 4 months. 18 days, 



11) 



NAMES OF PERSONS HAVING DOGS LICENSED IN 1S7G. 



Name of Owner. 

Francis Hosmer, 
William L. Mitchell, 
Theron F. Newton, 
Xeil Currie, 
George V. Mead, 
Luther Conant, 
Martha D. Ball, 
lie my Brooks, 
Win. S. llandley, 
Henry Haynes 
Willie F. Richardson, 
Levi Houghton, 
•las. E. Harris, 
Edwin Tarbell, 
E. F. Fuller, 
.Solon A. Bobbins, 
Henry Shapley, 
Francis Dwight, 
John W. Randall, 
Einathan Jones, 
John Temple, 
Aaron 0. Handley, , 
James Hannon, 
H. Waldo T uttlc, 
Tattles, Jones & 

Wetherbee, 
Lucius S. Hosmer, 
< Jeorge Conant, 
( reorge R. Keyes. 
Daniel Harris, 
C. A. Harrington, 
(reorge C. Conant, 
John W. Charter, 
Jona P. Fletcher, 
Daniel Tuttle, 
•Joseph Reed, 
Aaron J. Fletcher, 
Daniel H. Farrar, 
J. II. Daniels, 



Name of Owner. No. 

Richard Williams, 1 

Hanson A. Littleheld, 1 

Chas. W. Parker, 1 

James Mortis, 1 

W. E. Faulkner, 1 

Aaron S. Fletcher, i 

Amasa M Knowlton, 1 

Geo. W. Knowlton, 1 

E, J. Bobbins, (t'em. ) 1 
Daniel Wetherbee, 1 
Daniel J. Wetherbee, J 
Elbridge Robbins, 1 
Jas. R. Bassett, 1 
Charles Morris, 1 
L. M. Jackson, (fem.) 1 
D. W. Corfey, 1 
W. W. Wooster, 1 
Charles Wooster, 1 
George Gardner, I 
A. B. Brown, 1 
George C. Wright, 1 
M. F. Go, 1 
Oscar E. Preston, I 
James Waldron. 1 

F. M. Lund, (fem.) 1 
S. F. Reed, 1 
Frank Marshall, 1 
Edward O'Xeil, 1 
J. W. Aldrich, 1 
Geo. A. Hay ward, 1 
A. A; O. W. Mead. 1 
Henry Hanson, 1 
Joseph Wheeler, 1 
S. Taylor Fletcher, 1 
John Fletcher & Sons, 1 
M. E. Taylor, 1 
Lucy Jane Tuttle, 1 
Henry M. Potter, 1 
Warren E. Taylor, J 



Name of Owner. No 

Jas. E. Richardson, 

(fem.) 
' H. M. Beck. 

A. L. Tuttle, 

Chas. Wheeler, (fem.) 

Henry M. Smith, 

F. M. Sisson, 

Reuben L. Reed, 

Benj. Hapgood, 

Silas Conant, Jr.. 

Arthur Pickens, 

Josiah Piper, 

Constantine O'Xeil, 

Luke J. Rotbin-, 
(t'em. ) 

Jairus U. Wheeler, 

Moses Taylor. 

Nahum C. Beed. 

Herman A. Barker. 

George Roiiillard, 

Emma C. Reed, 

Walter A. Gilmore, 

Lester Fletcher, 

Augustus Fletcher, 

Frank Pratt, 

Chas. D. Griggs, 

Luther R. For bush, 
i Lewis II. Boucher, 

Ellen Moore, 

J. P. Roiiillard. 

F. Robbins, (fem.) 

Frank II. Harris, 

John White, (fem. I 
! Warren B. Reed, 
, Eben Davis, 
[ Patrick Redding, 

Chas. E. Teel, 

Allen Smith, 

M. A. Snell. (fem.) 



Males, 108 at §2 00,= 
Females, •"> 00,= 



Total, 



117 



§216 00 
45 00 

$26] 00 



WM. D. TUTTLE, Town Clerk 



Acton, March 14, 1877. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee ffTown of Acton 



FOR THE 

SCHOOL YEAR, 1876-7. 



To the Citizens of Acton. 

Your School Committee, having discharged the duties 
assigned them by law, respectfully submit for your con- 
sideration the following report : 

It has been customary, in presenting the annual reports 
of this committee, first of all, to offer congratulation upon 
the successful operation of the schools during the period 
embraced in the report, and there is no reason why this 
time-honored practice should be departed from in the pres- 
ent report. 

We have endeavored to secure efficient teachers by em- 
ploying only those who had been successful in other 
schools, and were able to present satisfactory recommend- 
ations. In some cases the success of teachers has not 
realized our expectations, as it will be the case sometimes 
that a teacher will be very successful in one school and fail 
in another. 

We have visited the schools from time to time, and have 
conducted two public examinations in all the schools that 
have been in operation the usual three terms. Taking 
everything into consideration we are of the opinion that 
the success of our schools has been as good as reasonablv 
could be expected. 

But for a more particular review of the educational work 
of the town during the past year, we refer you to the last 
part of this report. Before entering upon this review we 
beg leave to offer certain suggestions with reference to the 
future management of our schools, whereby we believe 
their efficiency can be greatly increased. 



CO-OPERATION OF PARENTS. 

Under this head we notice, 1st, the need of the more per- 
fect co-operation and the more cordial support of parents. 
This is a subject which has been adverted to very frequent- 
ly in these reports, but the experience of the past year im- 
presses upon us the need of referring to it yet again. As 
regards the great majority of the parents and citizens gen- 
erally, we have no reason for complaint, but the best of 
reasons for commendation. But we are sorry to be oblig- 
ed to say that there have been some parents during the 
past year who have impaired the efficiency of our schools 
by encouraging their children in their disobedience to the 
regulations of the schools. Some parents seem to think 
that the government of our schools, like the government of 
the town is democratic, in the sense that the scholars have 
the right to determine what the laws of the schools shall 
be. But this is an erroneous idea of the provisions which 
the State has made for the management of her schools. For 
a parent to directly interfere with the teachers discipline of 
a scholar is as ruinous to the harmonious and successful 
management of a school as it would be detrimental to 
the good order of the family, were the mother to inter- 
fere with the father's correction of the children. Par- 
ents : If you think you have grounds for complaint, 
as regards the teachers treatment of your children, 
as you value your children's good, do not even hint the 
idea to them, but quietly communicate your convictions to 
the teacher and seek an explanation. If you are not satis- 
fied with the teachers views of the case lay the matter be- 
fore the committee and we are satisfied that every cause 
for complaint will be removed. Do not allow prejudice or 
a partial view of the case to lead vou to make captious re- 
marks about the teacher which will lower her in the esti- 
mation of the scholars. Do not condemn a teacher, as be- 
ing unlit for her vocation, until you have visited the school 
and become satisfied by actual observation, as to her real 
accomplishments. It is often the case that the teacher who 
is most adversely criticized outside appears to excellent 
advantage in the school room. Remembering that no one 
in any vocation is perfect, in every respect, if the commit- 
tee decides that a certain teacher is better qualified for her 
work than anv other he will be likelv to be able to secure: 



acquiesce in his decision and do your utmost to contribute 
to her success. If all the parents in Acton would adopt 
these principles and practice them, every school would be 
a success. 

CLASSIFICATION OF SCHOLARS. 

A second thing concerning which there is an imperative 

need of improvement, is as regards the classification of the 
scholars. The laws of the State refer this matter wholly 
to the committee, and we believe the efficiency of the 
schools would be greatly promoted were they to exercise 
this authority to a greater extent. 

Our scholars are always ambitious to- press into the 
higher studies ; when left to themselves they too Irequent 
ly enter classes for which the}' are not at all qualified ; by 
so doing they greatly increase the labors of the teacher, 
impede the progress of others really qualified for the study 
and fail of the good which the}' themselves might receive 
were thev in text books suited to them. 

This evil is manifest not onlv as regards the scholar's 
choice of particular studies, but also as regards their pro- 
motion from one grade of text books to another. This 
difficulty is especially manifest in our reading and arith- 
metic classes. We have six grades of reading books, 
adapted to the capabilities of scholars from the child in 
the alphabet to the intelligent reader of the writings of 
Thomas Jefferson and Ralph Waldo Emerson. But it is 
sometimes the case that the period of but little more than 
five years takes a scholar from the first of the series into 
the last. Many parents and scholars seem to think that 
the passable pronunciation of the larger part of a reading 
exercise is all that is necessary, while as a fact, this is on- 
ly a small part of the art of reading. Pupils ought not to 
be allowed to press from one grade of reading books into 
another until they can not only pronounce the words cor- 
rectly, but also give, at least approximately, a correct 
expression to the sentiment of the pieces. Correct empha- 
sis and modulation of voice are as essential elements in 
good reading as the proper pronunciation, a fact which 
ought not to be overlooked by teachers, parents or scholars. 

The evil to which we are referring is also very manifest 
as regards the study of arithmetic. Scholars find their 



way into written arithmetic before they have an adequate 
knowledge of the mental, and enter the High School 
arithmetic before they have thoroughly mastered the Com- 
mon School. We believe it would be better for our schools 
and scholars were the High School arithmetic excluded 
altogether, but if we are to have so many grades of text 
books, scholars ought to be subjected to a rigid examina- 
tion in order to an advancement from a lower to a higher 
grade. Pare .its ought not to insist upon the promotion of 
their children unless they are competent for it. The intro- 
duction of a system of examination into our schools would 
greatly facilitate the work of teaching, and would stimu- 
late the scholars to exert themselves to become tit for 
promotion. 

If such a system is adopted by the committee, we hope 
it will have your cordial support. 

DRAWING AM) MUSIC. 

During the past year the claims of art drawing and 
music have been urged upon our attention quite frequently 
and we most cordially concur with everything that lias 
been said in favor of their introduction into our common 
schools. Owing to the fact that our schools have been so 
crowded with classes and different branches of study, and 
we have seen so much room for improvement as regards 
the branches already taught, we have been reluctant to 
introduce other branches. We are aware, however, that 
the importance of these branches cannot be over esti- 
mated, and we will be glad to find their introduction into 
our schools feasible. For scholars to learn even the first 
principles of linear drawing will be of untold advantage 
to them in after life. Nicely graded drawing books are 
now published at a low price, and such books of instruc- 
tion accompany them that almost any teacher can learn to 
impart instruction in drawing with a considerable degree 
of success, though it would be of great advantage if all 
our instructors could have the benefit of the training of a 
o;ood teacher. 

If the committee decide to introduce drawing to some 
degree, we hope the project will have the co-operation of 
all the parents. 

Instruction in the art of music is attended with more 



difficulty, as the ability to sing is almost absolutely neces- 
sary in order that an instructor may be able to teach this 
branch. The generally received plan for the most tho- 
rough teaching of this branch seems to be to employ a 
music teacher to give instruction at appointed times in 
each school every week. The adoption of this plan would 
require a special appropriation of several hundred dollars. 
Another plan suggests itself, which is to secure the ser- 
vices of proficient musicians, though not professional 
teachers, in the different parts of the town, to go into the 
schools near them and impart to the scholars some knowl- 
edge of music, at certain times set apart for that purpose. 
If the town will appropriate one hundred dollars for the 
object we will be pieased to make a trial of the plan. 

ABSENTEEISM. 

This evil is becoming more and more prevalent in our 
schools, and as we are now situated, we have no remedy 
for it. It is the duty of every parent to keep his children, 
(if of a certain age,) in school at least twenty weeks dur- 
ing the year, and it is the duty of each town to pass such 
laws as will secure the fulfillment of this requisition of 
the State. But as it now is in this town, there is a very 
large number of children who do not go to school even 
ten weeks, nominally, and really are absent much of the 
time when their names are upon the rolls of the schools. 
There is a large number of scholars in this town who 
leave school if restrained by rightful regulations, and dur- 
ing the remainder of the term are lounging about the 
streets or sitting in the stores as truants. 

We respectfully recommend that the town adopt the by- 
laws for the suppression of truancy which it is within the 
province of the town to enact for the suppression of the 
evil just referred to. We recommend that the town adopt 
as by-laws for the suppression of truancy, something as 
follows : 

1 . Any of the persons described in the first section of 
the "Act concerning Truant Children and Absentees from 
school," passed May 2, L873, upon conviction of any of- 
fence therein described, shall be committed to the State 
Primary School at Monson, for such time, not exceeding 



two years, as such judge, justice or court having jurisdic- 
tion of the same may determine. 

2. Any child between the ages of seven and fifteen, who 
while a member of any school, shall absent himself from 
school, without the consent of his teacher and parent or 
guardian, shall be deemed a truant. 

3. Any child between the ages of eight and twelve, 
who shall not attend some public school or suitable institu- 
tion ot instruction at least twentv weeks during the year 
shall be deemed a truant. 

4. The School Committee shall annually choose three 
or more truant officers, whose duty it shall be to make 
complaints in case of violation of these by-laws, for the 
purpose of carrying into execution the sentence thereof, 
who shall receive such compensation for their services as 
the school committee shall determine. 

f>. It shall be the duty of every truant officer to inquire 
diligently concerning all persons between the ages afore- 
said who seem to be idle and vagrant, and who, whether 
employed or unemployed, appear to be growing up in 
ignorance, and to enter a complaint against anyone unlaw- 
fully absent from school or violating any of these by-laws. 

6. It shall be the duty of every truant officer prior to 
making any complaint before a justice, to notify the truant 
or absentee child and its parent or guardian of the penalty 
of the offence. If he can obtain satisfactory pledges of 
reformation, which pledges shall be subsequently kept, 
he shall forbear to prosecute. 

Respectfully submitting for your consideration the fore- 
going recommendations, we now invite your attention to a 
brief review of each school. 

( EXTRE GRAMMAR. 

The Spring term was taught bv Miss S. J. Flint, a 
teacher who was favorably noticed in connection with this 
school, in our last annual report. So far as we could judge 
she taught a good school. 

The Fall and Winter terms were taught by Miss M. C. 
Harris, a teacher who has been noticed in terms of high 
praise, in two previous annual reports. She devoted her 
whole heart and all her energies to her work, and the schol- 
ars made a steady progress under her instruction. We 



have never witnessed a more satisfactory examination in 
connection with this school than that which was conducted 
at the close of the Winter term. We considered the order 
of this school better than it has been in any term for sever- 
al years. The eminent success of the school is largely due 
to this fact. 

CENTRE PRIMARY. 

This school was taught throughout the year by Miss S. 
F. Robbins. a teacher who has received commendation in 
our two last annual reports. She retains the love of her 
scholars to a marked degree, and the school shows a 
steady progress under her care. 

SOUTH GRAMMAR. 

The Spring and Summer terms of this school were 
taught by Miss M. L. Davis. Miss D. is a teacher of good 
attainments and well fitted for the work of the instructor, 
but proved to be somewhat wanting as a disciplinarian. 
She failed to maintain good order herself and neglected to 
call in the assistance of the committee, so that the discip- 
line of the school became lax under her care. With the 
qualification just mentiond the school was a success. 

The Winter term was taught by Miss M. E. Felton a 
teacher of superior qualifications in every respect. She 
found the discipline of the school very laborious, but with 
the co-operation of the committee maintained good order 
to the end of the term, though quite a number of scholars 
retired from the school. The examination at the end of the 
term wa§ eminently satisfactory. 

SOUTH PRIMARY. 

This school enjoved the continued services of Miss M. 
A. Forbush, who was mentioned in terms of approval in our 
last report. Her success during the past year has been 
fully equal to that referred to in our last report. 

At the close of the very pleasant examination which 
ended the winter term the scholars presented to their teach- 
er some beautiful tokens of their love and appreciation of 
her untiring labors for their good. Would that such oc- 
casions were more frequent. 



WEST GRAMMAR. 

The Spring term of this school was taught by Miss Belle 
Smith, a teacher eminently qualified for her work. She 
devoted herself to her duties with all the energy at her 
command and imparted a spirit of animation to her schol- 
ars. The school was a success in every respect, and we 
were very sorry to part with her services. The Fall and 
Winter terms were taught by Miss S.J. Flint, who has been 
favorably mentioned in connection with another school. 
She proved herself here as elsewhere a good instructor but 
failed in discipline, so that the good she would have done 
otherwise was greatly neutralized. The examination, how- 
ever, at the end of the Winter term was very satisfactory. 

WEST PRIMARY, 

This school, like the other primary schools in town, has 
had the benefit of the continued instructions of the same 
teacher. 

This teacher has been continued in the same school 
longer than any other teacher in town, and the vigorous 
condition of her school speaks volumes in favor of continu- 
ing an efficient teacher in the same school. At the close 
of the Winter term her pupils presented to her a beautiful 
gift, as an expression of their love and gratitude for her 
long continued labors for their good. 

EAST SCHOOL. 

The spring term of this school was taught by Miss M. 
I. Spalding, a former teacher in the N. H. State Normal 
School. She is a teacher eminently well qualified for her 
work, and so far as we could judge taught a good school. 
Having been engaged in teaching older scholars for sev- 
eral terms, and coming to her work in this school some- 
what wearied with previous labor, it may be she did not 
feel quite the interest in the young scholars or devote her- 
self to her duties with quite the energy which she would 
have manifested under other circumstances. 

The fall and winter terms were taught by Miss G. E. 
Turtle. Miss T. had the love and co-operation of her 
pupils to a marked degree, and gave herself wholly to her 
work. The examinations at the end of the Fall and Winter 



terms were very satisfactory, and proved the scholars to be 
making a steady progress in their studies. 

NORTH SCHOOL. 

The spring term was taught by Miss L. A. Farnum. 

This teacher was favorably mentioned in our last report. 
We will simply say that we considered her success this 
term fully equal to that of any previous term, and we very 
reluctantly parted with her services. 

The fall and winter terms were taught by Miss IlattieE. 
Parker, a teacher who had been very successful in another 
town. For some reason she failed to receive the good will 
of her scholars or the full confidence of the parents. The 
examinations at the end of both terms were quite credita- 
ble, especial!}' the one at the end of the winter term. It 
seldom has been our privilege to listen to as good recita- 
tions in Mental Arithmetic. 

SOUTH EAST. 

On account of the small number of scholars in this dis- 
trict but one term of school has been held during the year. 
This was taught by Miss H. F. Hapgood who was men- 
tioned in our last report. 

The examination at the end of the term was as credita- 
ble as any we have ever heard in this school. 

Appended are the usual statistical reports. In the num- 
ber of visits neither the visits of the superintendent nor 
of friends at the public examinations are reported. 

R e s p e ctfu 1 1 v sub m i tte d . 

s. W. IIOPKIXS. (chairman) ) 

J. W. LOKER, (el j School 

L. CONAXT. [ Committet 

C. A. HARRINGTON, 

I). J. WETHERBEE, Acton. 

J. FLETCHER, 2d, J 

F. P. WOOD. Superintendent of Schools. 



10 



ROLL OF HONOR. • 



NOT ABSENT OK TAKDY 
ONE TERM. 



NOT ABSENT <>K TARDY 
TWO TERMS. 



)T ABSENT OB TARDY 
THREE TERMS. 



Lizzie J. (Jammings, 
Ella Daniels, 
Annie M. Hammond, 
Nellie G. Haynes, 
Hattie D. Reed, 
Arthur F. Davis, 
John F. Kingsley, 
Elliot Livermore, 
Gilman Pari in, 
George W. Tnttle. 



E. Elmira Ayers, 
-Jennie L. Ayers . 
Bertha I. Fisk, 
Gertrude Rouillard, 

Lizzie M. Scoheld. 
Hattie E. Smith, 
Augusta W, .Smith, 
Herman S. Ayers, 
Florian W. Fisk, 
Warren O. Robbins, 
Charles Kouillard. 



Addie H. Barker, 

Xettie C. Fuller, 
Henrietta F. Sawyer, 
Carrie B. Hay ward, 
Susie A. Moulton, 
Fred A. Brown, 
Lawrin Pratt, 
Eddie Pool. 



Gertie S. Harrington, 
Mary I. Jackson, 
Ada M. Jones, 
Mary A. Knights, 
Martha E. Pratt, 
Ma Del Richardson, 
Sadie E. Sawyer, 
John Bradley, 
James E. Coulter, 
Chrissie A. Pollard, 
A. Ernie Wilbur. 



(ENTER GRAMMAR. 

Mabel Livermore, 
Ella E. Tattle, 

Mary F, Waldron, 
Walter Richardson, 
Horace F. T Little, 
L. Harry Tnttle. 



CENTRE PRIMARY. 

S irata E. Hammond, 
Mary Radding, 

Frank E. Fisk. 
George A. Smith. 



Viola S. Tuttle, 
Elbridge R. Conant. 



Etta A. Tuttle, 

Hattie L. Tuttle. 



SOUTH GRAMMAR. 

.Jessie A. Mitchell, 
Arlon L. Jackson, 
Willie Wilbur. 



SOUTH PRIMARY. 

idella J. Barker, 
L. Gertie Clark, 
Josie M. Hannon, 
Emily G. Hannon, 
Lulie Hosmer, 
Eda F. Shapley, 
Eva C. Shapley, 
Harry A. Fletcher, 
Charlie P. Tucker. 



Etta C. Temple. 



M. Florence Fletcher. 
Willie S. Randall. 



11 



Xellie Walker, 
Inez Wyman, 
Ellsworth Hapgood, 
Crosby A. Hoar, 
Charles Holton, 
Chailes H »pkhis, 
George Robinson, 
Warren A. Stevens. 



Ida Littierield, 
Bertha Wright, 
John A Id rich, 
Emerv Clark', 
Willie J. Handley, 
Willie F. Hopkins. 
Eugene L. Hall, 
Ned. Holton, 
Ernest H. Knowlton, 
David Kinsley, 
Bertie F. Mead, 
Freddie B. Palmer, 
Clesson J. Parker, 
Herman W. Parker, 
Willie Parker. 
Alfred Richardson. 
Frank A. Teele, 
Bertie Willis. 



Etta Esterbrook, 
Hattie Esterbrook, 
Florence Perkins, 
Xixon Bail, 
Carlton C. Coiiant, 
Frank Wetherbee. 



Lizzie Ryan, 
Xellie Ryan, 
Hattie Smith, 
Mattie Smith, 
Carrie White, 
Charlie Fisk. 
Elmer Rouillard. 



Lester X. Fletcher. 



WEST URAMMAK, 

Liz/.ie (rates, 
Mary Tuttle, 
Arthur H. Bradford, 
Ceorge Mead, 
Fred. Mead, 
Clarence Twitche). 



WEST PRIMARY* 

Hattie Davis, 
Wallie C. Gardner, 
Herbert Hap2o<":. 



da L 1 



EAST SCHOOL. 

Alma W. Forbnsh, 
Geo. L. Bobbins, 
Geo. H. Bobbins, 
Willie E. Smith, 
Ernest Wetherbee. 



NORTH SCHOOL. 

Aunie Gallagher, 
Minnie Harris. 
Hattie Harriss, 
Everett Rouillard, 
Jame> Ryan. 



SOITH EAST 



Herbert Bobbin- 
Harry Bobbins. 



Bertie Smith. 



12 



TABULAR VIEW. 



SCHOOLS. 



Center. 
South. 

West. 

East. 
North. 



Center. 

South. 

West. 

East. 

North. 



( Grammar, 
I Primary, 
. i rrammar, 
/ Primary, 
•, Grammar, 
i Primary, 



i Grammar, 
) Primary, 
(, Grammar, 
\ Primary, 
< ( i-raaimar, 
I Primary. 



Centre 

South. 

West. 

East. 
North. 
South East. 



<; Grammar, 
\ Primary, 
CGrammfcr, 
I Primary. 
S Grammar, 
I Primary, 



TEACHERS. 



of 



Spring Tjerm. 

Miss S.J. Flint, 

'• S.F. Eobbins, 

■' M. L. Davis, 

'• ;\j. a. Forbush, 

" V>. Smith, 

" 0. A. Hopkins. 

" AL. I. Spaulding, 

'• L. A. Farnum, 

Totals, 



Fall Term. 



Miss M. C. Harris, 

•' S. F. Robbins, 

" M.L. Davis, 

'• M. A. Porbush, 

'• S.J. Flint. 

" O. A. Hopkins, 

" (i.E. Tattle, 

" H.E.Parker, 



Totals, 



Winter Term. 

Miss M. C. Harris, 

" s. v. Bobbins,' 

" M. E. Felton. 

" ?.I. A. Forbush, 

" s .J.Flint. 

•' O A. Hopkins. 

'• (.. K. Tuttle, 

" H. E. Parker, 

•' H. F. Hapgood, 

Totals, 

Aggregate for the year. 



2} 



10] 



:;()'. 



53 *• e | te£ 



$40 
32 
36 
40 

40 
40 
30 
28 



$286 00 25^ 



50 
75 2 
75! 




2.1 



31.09 



38 31.60 
36 31.50 



$:i2 00 2! 21.53 
32 
36 
40 
40 
40 
32 
30 



4:;. To 
30 
38 
19 



18 14.83 



$282 00 265 230.16 



$40 00 
3i 00 
to 00 

40 Oil 
40 00 
40 00 

34 00 
84 on 

35 00 



$335 0(J 



34.90 

28 

37.5B 

3S.50 

36 

41 

21 50 

JS.20 
7.50 



3«7 261.10 



07:i $903 00 829722.35 13 87 



07 



11 102 



15 

10 
21 
20 
33 
18 
17 
'.) 
1 

15:5 

347 



Total average per centage of attendance during the year, 87.1.3. 



FINANCIAL EEPORT. 



SOUTH SCHOOL, 

Drawn from the treasury, 
Received for Grass, 

" Repairs, 

Balance from last year, 

Paid to teachers, 3659 00 

" for coal and teaming, 43 33 

M " care of house aud furnace, 54 15 

* " text books (not properly in this account,). 2 70 
" " broom, crayons, ink, etc., 5 99 

Balance on hand, 109 39 



$742 


14 


1 


50 




50 


130 


42 



$874 56 



$874 56 



C. A. HARRINGTON, Committee. 
WEST SCHOOL. 



Drawn from the treasury, $697 33 



$580 00 


12 


63 


31 


50 


14 


46 


18 


74 



$697 33 



Paid teachers, 
for fuel, 

for care of house, 
for incidentals, 
Balance on hand, 

$697 33 
S. W. HOPKINS, Committee. 

CENTRE SCHOOL. 



$780 03 



Drawn from the treasury, 


$692 31 


Balance from last year, 


87 72 


Paid to teachers, 


$5(}5 00 


for fuel, 


58 59 


care of house, 


30 00 


incidentals, .cleaning house, &c, 


8 56 


Balance on hand, 


117 88 



$780 03 
LUTHER CONANT, Commit ike. 



14 



NORTH SCHOOL. 



Drawn from the Treasury, 
Balance from last year, 



Paid to teachers, 
for fuel, 

care of house and incidentals, 
Balance on hand, 

$324 99 
J. W. LOKER, Committee. 



$323 84 


1 


15 


243 


00 


47 


60 


7 


75 


26 


64 



S324 99 



$241 


50 


37 


75 


10 


00 


4 


00 


30 


59 



$323 84 



EAST SCHOOL. 

Drawn from the treasury, $323 84 

Paid to teachers, 
for fuel, 

care of house, 
incidentals, 
Balance on hand, 

$323 84 
D. J. WETHERBEE, Committee. 

SOUTH EAST SCHOOL. 
Drawn from the treasury, $140 00 

Paid teacher, 
for iuel, 

incidentals, 
care of house, 

$140 00 



Amount of money raised by the town, 
Income from the State school fund, 
" " Dog fund, 

Total, $2919 48 



$1J2 50 


18 


00 


1 


50 


8 


00 


R2nd, 


Co 


$2500 


00 


193 


76 


225 


72 



$140 00 



K umber of children between the age of five and fifteen reported by 
the Assessors, 296. 

Sum appropriated by the town for each scholar, $8.44. 



REPOKTS 



^i^cTjM^X ®K® o^Sijf} o*¥ids^S 



jpn py apw 



FEB. 26, 1877, TO FEB. 2f>, 1878, 



INCLUDING THE 



Jlktfikgeg, Sirrl^ &qd f)eatl^ iq 18^, 



ALSO, THE 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



ACTON : 

Printed at the Office of the Acton* Patriot, South Acton. 

1878. 



TOWN OFFICERS FOR 1878. 



TOWN CLERK. 

Wm. D. Tattle! 

SELECTMEN. 

Daniel J. Wetlierbce, Jolin White. Chas. B. Stone. 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Elisha II. Cutler, John White. Thomas P. Sawyer. 

ASSESSORS. 
Wm. D. Tattle, Aaron C. Handler, Phineas Wetherhee. 

HIGHWAY SURVEYORS. 

Daniel Wetherbee, Charles Wheeler, Abram H. Jones. 

Geo. R. Reyes, A. M. Knowlton. 

FENCE VIEWERS. 

John Fletcher, 2d, John R. Houghton, Nahum C. Reed. 

SURVEYORS OF LUMBER. 

Levi W. Stevens, Ed. F. Kichardson, Chas. B. Stone, 

Francis Dwight, Geo. H. Harris, Wm. B. Davis, 

Elbridge Ilobbins, E. J. Kobbins. 

SURVEYORS OF WOOD. 

Lucius S. Hosmer, J. R. Bassett, S. L. Dutton, 

Chas. B. Stone, E. J. Bobbins, Jona. W. Loker, 

Geo. H. Harris, Wm. B. Davis, Geo. II. Warren, 

Moses E. Taylor, Henry D. Parlin. 

SURVEYORS OF HOOPS AND STAVES. 

David M. Ilandley, Jos. Dole, Wm. Reed. 

FIELD DRIVERS. 

Simon Blanchard, Chas. H. Teel, G. A. Hay ward, 

Otis H. Forbush, Loring M. Fowler, Eph. B. Forbush. 

CEMETERY COMMITTEE. 

John Fletcher, Jr., Jos. F. Cole, Wm. W. Davis. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



Appropriations and 


Receipts. 


Unexpended balance of last year, 


88,787 87 


Regular Town Grant, 


8,000' 00 


Town Grant for Schools. 


2,500 00 


41 " " Highways, 


♦ 1,500 00 


County Tax, 


633 17 


State " 


1,080 00 


Overlayings, 


160 21 


Liquor Licenses, 


387 50 


Cash Luther Conant, 


500 00 


State Aid to Jan. 1, 1877, 


198 80 


Cemetery Receipts. West Acton, 


13 50 


Corporation Tax. 


812 08 


National Bank Tax, 


■•m 5i» 


State Paupers, 


61 00 


Supt. Burials State Paupers, 


10 00 


Town of Watertown, support Sam. Beacon, 51 08 


State School Fund, 


1S8 78 


' : Pauper Burials, 


4 99 


Trustees Baptist Society, Worcester, 


for 


support of Sarah B. White, 


52 00 


Dog Fund, 


171 8G 


Woodlawn Cemetery, 


52 08 


Town Hall, 


101 47 




OOA-IAI QO 




T^VjJvJL OO 



Expenditures. 

SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 

Paid C. A. Harrington, South District, 8707 00 



Paid C. B. Stone, West District, $707 00 



Luther Conant, Centre District, 


697 00 


John W. Loker, North " 


320 00 


D. J. Wetherbee, East " 


320 00 


W. S. Jones, So. East 


185 00 







Repairs on Town Buildings. 

Paid C. A. Harrington, for painting South 

Acton School House, $93 71 

C. B. Stone, for finishing West Acton 
School House ; furnishing Blinds ; 
painting outside two coats ; furnish- 
ing Ventilators, Registers, Piping, 
Lumber, Hardware and Labor as 
follows : 

W. Emery, Doors, 
Lewis Boles k Son, Blinds, 
W. Houghton, Labor, 
S. W. Hopkins, Material. 
N. B. Conant, 
G. L. Towne, Lumber, &c, 

" " Labor, 
F. Conant, 

L. U. Holt, Piping, Register, Labor, 
A. Hayward, Labor, 

E. H. Cutler, for repairing Wagon 

House and Shop at Town Farm, 157 07 

John White, for labor and material for 

painting Town Farm buildings, (36 80 

L. U. Holt, repairing Register, Fur- 
nace and Stove Pipe in Town Hall, 

L. U. Holt, grate, school house, W. A. 

James Fiske — 

4 1-2 Doz. Burners for Town House, 
1 " Founts, 



18 40 


57 


70 


19 


15 


36 


7(5 


72 


16 


110 56 


121 


15 


9 


18 


51 


77 


77 


75 



29 


73 


4 


00 


11 


25 


1 


75 



$2,936 00 



6 Doz. Chimneys, 
1 u Brackets, 

1-12 kt Lamps, 
1-12 " Wick Trimers, 
1 1-6 " B. H. Holders, 

1-2 " Smoke Bells, 
Register Plate, 
1 Gross B. Wicks, 
Moulding and Express, 
Labor, material and changing desk, 

C. B. Stone, repairs on West School 
House, 

D. J. Wetherbee, repairs on the East 
School House, 

J. W. Loker, repairs on North School 
house, 



$5 40 


2 50 


25 


38 


1 10 


1 00 


85 


75 


2 80 


9 33 


2 25 



82 



12 75 



Books and Printing. 
Paid C.W. Leach, 500 Selectmen's Reports, $17 00 



10 Warrants, 
50 Dog Notices, 
500 Town Reports, 
14 Warrants, 
75 Posters, 
25 Voting Lists, 
12 Warrants, 
100 Blank Orders, 



1 25 

1 25 

70 00 

1 25 

1 75 
13 00 

2 00 
1 25 



Repairs on Highways. 

Paid A. H. Jones, breaking roads, So. and 

So. East part of Acton, 1876-1877, $123 59 

A. H. Jones, Lumber for Powder Mill 

Bridge, 111 25 

A. H. Jones, repairing Powder Mill 

Bridge, 50 98 



$986 23 



$108 75 



Paid Chas. Wheeler, breaking roads ; 1876 

and 1877, $130 66 

F. H. Whitcomb, breaking roads, 1876 

and 1877, 
Jas. E. Billings, breaking roads, 1876 

and 1877, 
Luther Conant, breaking roads, 1876 

and 1877, 
Geo. Harris, breaking roads, 1876 

and 1877, 
James Billings, labor railing roads, 
A. L. Brooks, lumber V " 
I. W. Flagg, nails, 
Daniel Harris, blacksmithing, 
Silas Conant, labor, 

u " 6 posts, 
D. J. Wetherbee. labor, mau and team, 
Chas. Wheeler, team, 
Moses Taylor, " 
McCan & Burns, iron, 



39 


50 


41 


43 


3 


45 


4 


87 


35 


47 


32 


88 




96 


16 


38 


28 


80 




33 


6 


52 


o 




06 


2 


00 


5 


03 



Regular Highway Work. 

CHARLES WHEELER, SURVEYOR. 

For 55 1-2 days work, 2.25 $123 75 



54 « 


u 


a 


oxen, 2.25, 




122 62 


103 


u 


fck 


horses, " 




154 49 


61 


u 


a 


C. H. W r heeler, 


1.50, 


91 50 


67 " 


u 


a 


James W r aldren. 




101 23 


71 " 


li 


a 


A. Smith, 




107 24 


2 


u 


a 


Thos. Owins, 




3 00 


14 1-4 


c« 


a 


Silas Conant, 




21 37 


26 " 


u 


u 


Chas. Morris, 




39 37 


3 


t< 


cc 


R. M. Gowell, 




4 50 


2 


hours 


a 


J. R. Daniels, 




30 


2 


u 


a 


Andrew Hapgood, 


30 



$637 1(J 



For 3 3-4 hours work, James E. Billings, 


56 


32 


U 


" Henry Worden, 


4 80 


Daniel Harris, blacksmith bill, 


2 00 


W. W. 


Worster. 


4 60 


S. A. Guilford, 


2 33 


F. M. 


Lum 


i, 


75 


Pick Handles. 


3 00 


Powdei 


r and Fuse, 

1 A. 11. JONES, SURVEYOR 


4 50 






For 65 1-2 


day; 


s work, 2.25, 


$147 38 


98 


n 


1 hour, horse, 1.50, 


147 15 


53 


u 


1 " oxen, 2.25, 


119 48 


61 


a 


3 " L. A. Jones, 1.50, 


91 95 


54 1-2 


a 


1 " Ed. O'Neal, 


81 90 


56 1-2 


u 


1 " A. Cole, 


84 90 


5 1-2 


u 


work, M. Bolton, 


8 25 


• 4 


a 


" N. Robbins, 


6 00 


2 


i. 


" D. Sheau, 


3 00 


3 1-2 


u 


" J. Mann, 


5 25 


2 


t< 


. • " J. Temple, 


3 00 


2 


a 


" 0. Flagg, 


3 00 


2 


a 


" W. Rynn, 


3 00 


Repair 


s on 


Tools, 


22 59 







By Order of Couiity Commissioners. 

Paid Reuben Handley, removing barn, $31 00 

Chas. Wheeler, for building road near 

li. Handley, 
C. Wheeler, building road at No. Acton. 

" work on So. Acton road. 

A. H. Jones, " " " 



25 


50 


37 


49 


339 


59 


52 


50 



Support of Poor. 

Paid E. H. Cutler, for support of — 

Clara Wheeler, #252 58 



to**** 



8 



G. E. Curtain, 




$6 50 


S. B. Childs, 




11 46 


John A. Childs, 




4 00 


G. J. Dole, 




5 82 


S. G. White, 




52 00 


Patrick Sullivan, 




3 64 


Wm. F. B. Whitney, 




283 18 


Tainor Family, 




142 38 


Samuel Beacon, 




51 03 


Betsey Chaffin, 




130 00 


Slade Family, 




(5b 00 


E. H. Cutler, expenditures on 


Town 




Farm for 1877 and 1878, 




345 HO 


E. H. Cutler, deficiency as per 


report 




of the Overseers of the Poor for the 




year 1876, 




108 57 


E. H. Cutler, account of error 


in re- 




port of Overseers of Poor, 1876, 


100 On 


For council in Sarah White case, 


7 00 


4 Journeys to Watertown, 




8 00 


1 " " Westford, 




1 50 


2 a " Boston, 




5 00 


4 u li Powder Mills, 




2 00 


4 " " Concord, 




2 00 







Town Debt. 




Paid Charles Morris, Note and interest, 


1370 30 


Lewis Rouillard, " « 


202 35 


James O. Faxon, " u " 


463 65 


Elizabeth Hanscom, 


694 16 


Paid Luther Conant, Note and interest, 


511 83 


Oliver W. Drew, 


631 90 



$1,586 66 



$2,874 19 



State Aid, 



Paid Rebecca C. Wright, 
Hattie W. Wilder, 



US 00 

48 00 



Cemetery Expenses. 

Paid John Fletcher, for labor in Woodlawn 

Cemetery, $58 72 

Joseph F. Cole, expenses in Mount 

Hope Cemetery, 84 50 







Town Officers. 




id F. P. Wood, Supt. of Schools, 1876, 


#87 00 


a n U 187 ^ 


40 00 


R. L. Reed, Sealer of Weights, 


10 00 


J. E. Cutter, Collecting Taxes, 


70 00 


Phineas Weth'erbee, Assessor, 


24 00 


A. C. Handley, " 


25 00 


W. D. Tuttle, 


30 00 


" " Town Clerk, 


1 25 00 


D. J. Wetherbee, Selectman, 


70 00 


John White, 


45 00 


C.B.Stone, •' 


45 00 






Interest on Notes. 




id J. K. Putney, 


#39 00 


O. L. B. Drew, 


36 00 


Frederick Rouillard, 


150 00 


Concord Bank, 


105 00 


James 0. Faxon, 


27 00 


John F. Nichols, 


34 51 


Mary P. Hosmer, 


60 00 


E. Hanscom, 


40 80 


Joseph Barker, 


60 00 



$96 00 



1143 22 



#471 00 



10 



id Joseph Noyes, 


$12 00 


Daniel Harris, 


48 00 


Louis Rouillard, 


12 00 


David M. Handley, 


180 00 


John F. Nichols, 


66 00 


Calvin Harris, 


12 00 


Concord Bank, 


105 00 


Jonathan A. Piper, 


36 00 


James E. Billings. 


135 96 


Phillip Peters, 


93 00 


Harriet Davis, 


30 00 


G. H. Harris, 


6 00 


T. F. Noyes, 


24 00 


Sarah C. Noyes, 


48 00 


Luther Billings, 


24 00 







Miscellaneous. 

Paid Geo. C. Wright, balance for building- 
West Acton school house, $15 16 

Jonas Blodgett, for selling W. Acton 
school house, 

J. E. Cutter, abatement of taxes, 

Sargent & Richardson, damage to sleigh, 

Reuben Handley, " " ." 

Luke Tuttle, loam for grading around 
the Monument, 

Luke Tuttle, two loads of manure, 
" " teaming " 

W. Morehouse, sod and teaming, 

D. Jones & Co., 3 signs, 

Julian Tuttle, 36 hours labor, 

Ai Robbins, " " " 
" " relaying Town House wall, 14 50 

J. E. Cutter, summoning persons to 

take the oath of office, 1 00 



3 


00 


49 


00 


25 


00 


4 


50 


4 50 


3 


28 


5 


17 


6 


75 


3 


00 


6 


00 


6 


00 



$1,384 2T 



11 



Abatement of taxes, 
T. C. Fletcher,- claim for damages, 
Geo. H. Jacobs, " t " 44 
Ai Robbins, splitting stone for Wood- 

f lawn Cemetery, 

Sharpening tools, 
D. J. Wetherbee, teaming stone, 
Luke Tuttle, " " 

Jas. E. Billings, 1 day's work, 
Silas Conant, 1 " 
Ai Robbins, setting bounds and post3 

on Common, 
A. C. Handley, Assessors' books, 

" " fare to Boston to meet 

Fish Commissioners, 1 30 

A. C. Handley, viewing J. Wheeler's 

farm, 1 50 



3 


93 


50 


00 


50 


00 


8 


00 




72 


21 


90 


IT 


32 


1 


50 


1 


50 


3 


00 


1 


92 



D. J. Wetherbee, coal for Town House, 


20 71 


a 


44 set of Sealers' scales, 


18 0O 


a 


u express 44 4i 


50 


it 


44 4f on bundle, 


75 


ti 


" iron for railings, 


13 93 


u 


'• book for registering 






voters, 


80 


Luther Conant, 1 cord of wood for 




Town House, 


5 00 


Francis 


Dwight, abatement of taxes. 


17 75 


a 


44 posting dog notices, 


2 00 


it 


44 tax book, 


1 00 


a 


44 posting dog law, 


3 50 


a 


44 repairing hearse, 


2 50 


it 


44 Supt. burials, 


60 00 


a 


44 Dis. on taxes, 1877, 


700 00 


a 


" making returns 19 






deaths. 


4 75 


Phineaa Wetherbee, appraising estate 




of J. 


Wheeler, 


1 00 



12 



Paid James Fisk( 


j, opening Town Hall 41 




times, 




$36 75 


James Fiske, 


care of clock, 


10 00 


u 


u 


oil, 


17 21 


t ( 


a 


repairing clock, 


7 50 


u 


a 


faucet, 


87 


ti 


a 


2 brooms, 


67 


a 


u 


brush and dust pan, 


62 


a 


a. 


wicks, 


10 


u 


a 


5 lights of glass, 


1 60 


a 


t: 


setting same and painting 








lantern, 


1 56 


(• 


a 


1 cord wood, 


3 00 


a 


a 


chimneys, 


25 


a 


u 


cleaning Town house and 








cellar, 


9 18 


a 


u 


C. lime, 


75 


i ( 


a 


painting desk, 


55 


u 


t< 


door spring and matches, 


35 


Wm. 


D. Tuttle, express and postage 








public documents, 


5 82 




u 


appraising estate of J. 








Wheeler, 


I 00 




u 


running lines on Com- 








mon and plan, 


5 00 




u 


recording 33 births, 


16 50 




u 


" 22 deaths, 


4 20 




il 


4< 17 marriages, 2 55 


J. E. 


Outtei 


, abatement of taxes by 








vote of town, 


42 64 




a 


money refunded on milk 








bill. 


112 64 







11,442 95 

Receipts from February 26, 1877, to February 26, 1878. 
Unexpended balance as per report of Feb. 

26, 1877, 13,787 87 



13 



Appropriations and Receipts, 


1,6313 


96 

$20 101 BS 








Expenditures. 




Support of Schools, 


$2,936 00 


Repairs on Town Buildings, 


986 


23 


Books and Printing, 


108 


75 


Repairs on Highways, 


637 


16 


Regular Highway Work, 


1,519 


06 


By Order of County Commissioners, 


486 


08 


Support of Poor, 


1,586 


66 


Town Debt, 


2,874 


19 


State Aid, 


96 


00 


Cemetery Expenses. 


143 


22 


Town Officers, 


471 


00 


Interest on Notes, 


1,384 


27' 


Miscellaneous, 


1,442 


95 


State Tax, 


1,080 


00 


County Tax, 


633 


17 

frl 6 H84 74 






'4PJ-U,OOT- | -± 



Balance in Treasury, Feb. 26, 1878, 13,717 09 



Town Debt. Notes. 


Daniel Harris, 


$819 33 


James E. Billings, 


4,036 37 


I. T. Magg, 


105 41 


Calvin Harris, 


202 63 


Luther Billings, 


405 49 


J. K. Putney, 


686 94 


Joseph Barker, 


1,019 24 


Joseph Noyes, 


205 16 


Jonathan A. Piper, 


205 16 



14 

D. M. Handley, 3,046 50 

Philip Peters, 1,570 70 

J. A. Piper, 404 66 

George H. Harris, 100 00 

Frederick Rouillard, 2,606 69 

Sarah C. Noyes, 800 00 

Thomas F. Noyes, 400 00 

M. P. Hosmer, L,039 33 

Middlesex Institution for Saving, B } 550 16 

Harriet Davis, 506 41 



Amount due from State Aid, $96 00 

" " a Town Treasurer, 3,717 09 



$21,710 15 



<•> 



3,818 09 



Balance against the Town, 117,897 06 

D. J. WETHERBEE, ) Selectmen 

.JOHN WHITE, - of 

CHAS. B. STONE, ) Acton. 

Acton, Feb. 26, 1878. 



15 



REPORT OF THE 

RECEIPTS and EXPENDITURES 

AT THE ALMSHOUSE IN ACTON, 
For the Year Ending: April 1st, 1878. 



ARTICLES OX HAM) APRIL 1, 1878. 

\) tons hay, $160 00 15 gallons vinegar. 

Oat fodder, 6 00 52 barrels, 

11 cows, 550 00 400 lbs. salt pork. 

1 horse, 150 00 75 lbs. ham, 
40 bush, corn, 26 00 1-2 bbl. salt pickles. 
1100 lbs. shorts. 7 00 Soap grease, 
300 lbs. meal, 3 40 1 1-2 bbl. soap, 
500 lbs. cotton seed meal, 6 75 Lard, 
Grass seed, 1 00 100 bushels potatoes. 

2 shoats, 2t> 0*0 Turnips, 
15 hens, 7 50 1-2 bushel rye meal. 

12 cords wood cut for 1 barrel flour, 

stove, 60 00 lpound tea, 

1 bbl. crackers, 3 50 

15 market boxes, 2 50 $1,149 30 



$a 

7 
40 
9 
1 
1 
6 
<> 
50 
1 

8 



(•) 
80 
00 
00 
50 
2:> 

75 
00 
00 
00 
60 
50 
50 



RECEIPTS FROM TOWN FARM 187 7. 



Received for cows, $141) 00 Received for potatoes,$33 

12 



Bovvker 


fund, 


12 00 


apples, 
labor, 




187 00 

77 4<) 


milk, 




576 96 


lumber, 




1 25 


grain, 

e gg s > 
stones, 




1 90 

1 48 
1 15 



calves, 
berries, 
chest of tools, 
paints, 
hide, 



$1,120 



03 

75 
90 
00 
44 
10 

36 



16 





EXPENSES. 






'aid for brush, 


50 Paid for matches, 


$1 20 


printers' ink, 


$8 78 


grass seed 


3 13 


tea, 


15 56 


whip lash, 


10 


tobacco. 


7 60 


candles, 


30 


snuff, 


94 


axe, 


90 


cream tartar, 


4 28 


axe helves. 


1 10 


sugar, 


28 49 


mortar, 


15 


tacks, 


1 82 


use of bull. 


2 50 


butter, 


54 93 


barrels. 


1 32 


tar paper, 


2 25 


awls. 


15 


brooms, 


1 78 


lemons, 


22 


cloth & cloth'g 


, 27 35 


corn starch, 


28 


grain, 


344 14 


japan, 


3 4 


bedbug poison 


, 25 


coffee, . 


22 


oil, 


8 01 


saltpeter, 


2 3 


spices. 


2 20 


wicks, 


05 


shoes, 


11 09 


indigo, 


12 


riles, 


42 


chimneys, 


38 


medicine. 


2 59 


books, 


79 


salt, 


5 40 


ginger, 


45 


mustard, 


50 


dried apple, 


36 


saleratus, 


1 55 


hops, 


20 


molasses. 


9 6() 


lard, 


88 


j u g s > 


80 • 


cows. 


195 00 


starch. 


39 


plough, 


11 00 


cheese, 


12 72 


newspapers, 


4 31 


crackers, 


43 22 


blacks'th bill. 


20 90 


beans, 


7 24 


labor, 160 00 


oat meal, 


1 ^ 


castings. 


2 25 


pepper, 


29 


boxes, 


50 


rye meal 


60 


butchering. 


1 25 


rish, 


3 87 


tinware, 


1 00 


soap, 


18 19 


lumber, 


1 59 


nails, 


3 57 


glasses, 


1 50 


lime, 


08 


Dr. Sanders' 




hoes, 


1 15 


bill, 


9 50 


meat, 


43 18 


coffin and robe 


phosphate. 


12 95 


for R u f u j 


5 


seeds, 


1 04 . 


Tenney and 



wire, 


• Li 

15 


potash, 


3 02 


Paris green. 


1 20 


room paper. 


2 50 


rope, 


45 


rake , 


25. 


scythes, 


2 78 


stone, 


45 


, fork handle, 


25 


glass. 


2 46 


stationery, 


1 00 


hooks. 


10 


raisins. 


] 28 


sweet potatoes 


39 


Hour, 


75 15 


yeast, 


6* 


putty, 


55 


spirits. 


79 


knife. 


35 


rosin. 


us 


* 
Total amount of Expenditures 


" ' w Receipts, 



burial in Lit- 
tleton, 19 00 
pigs. 11 00 
exp. market'g,13 25 
repar'g harnesses, 45 
use ot oxen, 15 00 
keeping cows, 28 00 
onions, 3 10 
vinegar, 4 00 
treight, 20 
services of X. 

S. Brooks,400 00 
services of E. 
H. Cutter as 

Overseer, 50 00 

John White, 10 00 
Thos P. San- 



gei 



00 



Deficiency. 

Balance due as per report of the Overseer of 

the Poor, April 1, 1877. 
Error in report, April 1, 1*77, 



Drawn from Treasurer to balance 

report of April, 1, 1877, $108 57 

Drawn from Treasurer on account of 

error, 100 00 

Drawn from Treasurer for use on farm 

in vear 1877-1878, 345 00 



$1,766 79 

•^1,7(5(; 79 
1,120 36 

$(54C> 4a 

$108 57 

100 00 

$855 00 



Balance due from Treasurer, April 1, 1878, 
Deficiencies of farm, $64(5 43 



$558 57 
$301 4?> 



1« 

Interest on farm, S-40 00 



$8ft<i 



r-J 



Victualing 425 tramps, 212 50 



Cost of supporting poor on farm, #67n 9o 

Whole number of persons, exclusive of tramps, sup- 
ported in Almshouse, i) ; average number, <> 1-2 : present 
number, ('». 



ELISHA II. CUTTER, )Overseers 
JOHN WHITE, \ of 

THOMAS P. SAWYER, S Poor. 



18 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT FOR 1877. 

?5arsFas in Acton in 1877. 

No. Date of birth. Name of child. Names of parent?. 

1. Jan. 9, Mabel Wayne, daughter of Robert and Lizzie A. Wayne. 

2. Jan. 14, Ellen Elizabeth Redding, daughter of Patrick and Hannah 

Redding. 

3. Jan. 25, James Calanan, son of Daniel and Ellen Calanan. 

4. Jan. 31, Henry Towle, son of Peter and Mary Towle. 

5. Feb. ;>, Sarah Frances Ayers, daughter of Arlin and Almira Ayers. 

('). Mar. 14, John Edward Hannon, son of Michael and Mary Ann Hannon. 

7. .Mar. 25, Clifford Warren Robbins, son of Edward Nelson Mid Angelia 

Robbius. 

8. Mar. 31, Ernest Woodville Pickens, son of Willie A. and .Mice Pickens. 

9. May 1*0, Mabel Jane Hewins, daughter of Arthur C. and Nancy A. 

Hewins. 

10. July t, Jessie Woodjrard Richardson, daughter of Henry W. and Mary 

][. Richardson. 

11. Aug. 11, Clara B. Sanders, daughter of Dr. Charles B. and Clara A. 

Sander-. 
11'. Aug. 20, Percy Eveleth Tuttle, son of Abrain and Martha A. Tattle. 

13. Ani:-. 22, Flora McLaughlin, daughter of .Tames W. and Delrlah N. 

McLaughlin. 

14. Aug. 23, Clara Luella Sawyer, daughter of Thorns J. and Kale Sawyer. 

15. Sept. 12, Maggie May, daughter of John and Julia May. 

16. Sept. 15, Mary Etta Morin, daughter of Joseph C. and Lucy J). Morin. 

17. Sept. 20, Lula Florence Whitcomb, daughter of Frank IT. and Frances 

L. Whitcomb. 

18. Sept. 20, Ella Lizzie Miller, daughter of Charles I. and L. Lizzie Miller. 

19. Oct. 2, Willie Herbert Gilmore, son of Walter A. and Emma A. 

Gilmore. 

20. Oct. 23, Julian Ainsworth Whitcomb, sou of Elwyn II. and Mary V. 

Whitcomb. 

21. Oct. 24, Wm. Henry Francis Davis, sou of Charles L. and Lucy C. 

Davis. 

22. Oct. 24, Maud Randall, daughter of Freeman L. and Amelia A. Randall. 

23. Nov. 4, son of William II. and Mary E. Tecl. 

o4. Nov. 18, Mary Aliee Minehan. daughter of Patrick and Ellen Minehan. 



|0 

25. Nov. 23, Howard White Hesselton, son of Lucius A. and Martha F, 

Hesselton. 
2G. Nov. 29, Herbert Davis, son of John and Elizabeth Davis. 

27. Dec. 8, James O'Conners, son of Morris and Honora Connors. 

28. Dec. 11, Chester Bryant bobbins, son of Elbridge J. and Lelia A, 

Robbins. 

29. Dec. 10, Mary Louise Owen, daughter of Thomas and Eliza Jane Owen. 

30. Dec. 29, Eva Clarissa Bassett, daughter of Joseph R. and Clarissa W. 

Bassett. 

JSiirfBis iia 18745 Omitted last Year. 

No. Date of birth, Name of child. Names of parents. 

1. Jan. 23, Roscoe A. Pickens, son of Willie A. and Aliec Pickens. 

2. Mar. 10, Arlin Rufus Ayers, son of Arlin and Almira Avers. 

Marriages Recorded iaa Acloa sn 1877. 

No. Date of marriage. Name and residence of parties. 

1. Dec. 28, 1876, Mr, Elbridge J. llobbins and Miss Lelia A. Farnum, both 

of Acton. 

2. Jan. 1, 1877, Mr. Otis II. Forbush, of Acton, and Mrs". Nettie F. 

Mathews, of Hancock, N. II. 

3. Jan. 18, Mr. Samuel Chaffin, of Acton, and Mrs. Amanda \V. l);iy, of 

Lowell. 
•1. Jan. 21, Mr. Ainasa M. Knowlton and Miss Elizabeth F. Blanchard, both 

of Acton. 
5. Jan. 23, Mr. Nathaniel II. Proctor, of Hollis, N. II.. and Miss S. Lizzie 

Billings, of Acton. 
(». Neb. 1, Mr. David M. Hand ley, of Acton, and Miss Nancy K. Nickerson, 

of Provincctown. 

7. Eeb. 25, Mr. Luke J. Robbins, and Miss Anna Barrett, both of Acton. 

8. Apr. 14, Mr. Ancil \V. Knowlton, of Acton, and Miss Lizzie M. Hill, of 

Boxborough. 
'.». Apr. 22, Mr. Simon Blanchard, of Acton, and Miss Susannah Wheeler, 
of Harvard. 

10. May 3, Mr. Leonard A. Walker, of Marlborough, and Miss Mary E. 

Worster, of Acton. 

11. May lo, Mr. Amos S. Tattle, of Stow, and Miss Amy M. Gaston, of 

Acton. 

12. June 6, Mr. Augustus Tuttle, of Sterling, and Miss Flattie E. Handley, 

of Acton. 

13. July IE Mr. Ephraim B. Eorbush and Mrs. Sarah P. Rand, both of 

Acton. 
11. Aug. 2, Mr. Loring N. Fowler and Miss Addie M. Barlow, both of Acton. 
15. Nov. 29, Mr. George A. Ilayward. of Acton, and Miss Susan E. Burr, of 

Ashby. 



21 

16. Dec. 11, Mr. Jacob Dockendorff, of Acton, and Miss Martha A. Sharpe, 

of Maynard. 

*7. Doc. 24, Mr. Charles II. Teel and Miss Estellal, Knowlton both of Acton. 

DEATHS 
«irtte> iu Acton in 1877. 

No. Date of death. Namea and ages of the deceased. 

1. Jan. 9, Mr. George G. Flagg, aged Gl years, 8 months, 1G days. 

2. Jan. 9, Mabel Wayne, daughter of Robert and Lizzie A. Wayne, aged 1 

day. 

3. Jan. 10, Mr. Joseph C. Wheeler, aged 53 years, G months, 19 day-. 

4. Feb. 1G, Miss Sabra A. Taylor, aged 41 years, 5 months. 

5. Feb. 17, Francis Tnttle, Esq., aged 86 years, 1 month, 12 day-. 

•(>. Mar. 17, Mrs. Nancy W. Adams, aged 70 years, 4 months, 5 days. 
7. Mar. 20, Mrs. Elizabeth A. Griggs, aged 39 years, 5 months, 8 days. 
/8. Mar. 27, Mr. Charles W. Leighton, aged 30 years, 8 months. 

9. May 9, Mr. Itufns Tenny, aged 82 years. 

10. May 23, Mr. Luther W. Piper, aged 52 years, 9 months, 2G nay*. 

11. July 24, Mr. Hiram L. Drew, aged 28 years. 

12. July 31, Cornelius J. Minehan, son of Patrick and Ellen Minehan, aged 

8 months, 14 days. 

13. Aug. 9, James Kockvvood Dunn, son of Waldo G. and Fanny M. Dunn, 

aged 2 years, 9 months. 

14. Aug. 11, Mrs. Clara A. Sanders, aged 3G years, 2 months, 13 days. 

15. Aug. 19, Walter B. Sanders, son of Dr. Charles B. and Clara A. Sanders, 

aged 1 year, 10 months, 3 days. 
1G. Sept. 20, Mrs. Eliza J. Whitcomb, aged 49 years, 7 months, 5 days. 

17. Sept. 22, Clara B. Sanders, daughter of Dr. Charles B. & Clara A. San- 

ders, aged 1 month, 11 days. 

18. Sept. 20, John McCarthy, son of Daniel and Mary McCarthy, aged 4 

years, G months, 1 day. 

19. Nov. 3, Mrs. Sophia Conant, aged GO years, 7,months, 23 days. 

20. Nov. 3, Mr. Charles Peary, aged 32 years. 

21. Nov. 12, Mr. Dennis Putnam, aged 82 years, 5 months, S days. 

22. Nov. 28, Mrs. Ellen Hannon, aged 84 years. 



22 



::si vi a;wK^)n sooct ^kiavh skosh:*<i jo sawvi 



Name ui' Owner. Xo. 

Augusta Hosmer, 1 

Francis Hosmer, 1 

James E. Harris. 1 

Chas. H. Hundley. 1 

John Fletcher Jr.. 1 

Daniel Harris. 1 

Francis Conant, 1 

Edwin Tarbell. 1 

Solon A. Kobbins, L 

Dennis W. Corfey, 1 

Hanson A. Eittlefield, 1 

Levi Houghton. 1 

Warren B. Reed, 1 

Geo. V. Mead, 1 

Aaro n C. Handley, 1 

Andrew Willis. 1 

Windsor Pratt. 1 

E. E. Fuller, 1 

John Temple, 1 

Mrs H. M. Beck, 1 

Augustus Fletcher. 1 

Luther Conant. 1 

Lester Fletcher. 1 

Sylvester Haynes, 1 

Chas. W. Parker. 1 

John White, (fern.) 1 

"Ellen Moore, 1 

Willie F. Richardson, I 

Theron F. Newton, 1 

Neil Currie, 1 

Geo. C. Conant. 1 

M. F. Going, , 1 



Name of Owner. No. 

A. B. Brown, 1 

Francis Pratt. 1 

Francis D wight, 2 

Lucius S. Hosmer. I 
Tuttles Jones & Weth- 

crbee. 2 

L. W. Stearns. 1 

Joseph Wheeler. 1 

Geo. R. Keyes, 1 

John Welch, 1 
Baldwin & Hesselton, 1 

H. Waldo Tuttle, I 

C A. Harrington. 1 

James Waldron. 1 

W. E. Faulkner, J 

Walter A. Gilmorc, 1 

George Conant, 1 

A. J. Fletcher, 1 

Nelson Tuttle,* 1 

Edwin Dwineils, I 

N. S. Brooks, 1 

M. E. Taylor, 1 
John Fletcher & Sons, 1 

John Grimes, I 

Ann Flinnegan. 1 

Frank Marshall, 1 

F. M. Sisson, I 

Elnathan Jones, I 

Sumner F. Reed. I 

James Hannon, L 
Charles Wheeler. 

(fern.) 1 



N ame of C) w u er . No. 
C. A. Pickens, (fern.) 
Charles Worster, 
Anson C. Piper, 
E. J. Bobbins, (fern.) 
Cyrus Hay ward, 
Geo. W. Livermore, 
Moses A. Reed, 
John W. Randall, 
O. E. Preston, 
Isaiah S. Leach, 
Henry Haynes, 
John W. Charter, 
Warren E. Taylor, 
Daniel Wetherbee, 
Allen Smith, 
Chas. L. Davis, 
Charles Morris, 
N. B. Conant & Co. , 
Henry Hanson, 
Geo. C. Wright, 
Thomas Calder, 
Frank Bobbins, 
Frank H. Harris. 
Daniel Tuttle, 
T. P. Coding, 
Geo. W. Knowlton, 
John P. Eouillard, 
Patrick Redding, 
Alonzo L. Tuttle. 
R. M. Gowell, 
Martha D. Ball, 
Jas. E. Richardson, 



Males, !»2 at 2 00 = $184. 
Females, 4 {i 5 00 = 20. 



Total. 



8204 



WM. 1), TUTTLE, Towx Clerk. 



Acton. March 20, 1878. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

School Committee iTown of Acton 



FOR THE 

SCHOOL YEAR, 1877-8. 



To the Citizens #/" Acton : 

Your School committee and Superintendent of schools, 
having discharged the duties submitted to their care, beg 
leave to present for your consideration the following re- 
port : 

In the composition of this report we have endeavored 
to embody not simply a statement of what we have done 
in our department of official town work, but we have 
striven also to put into it our views of the best methods for 
conducting the educational interests of the town. We 
hope a careful perusal of this report will convince you 
who have committed to us such an important trust, that we 
are devoting to it the thought which it justly demands. 

In the management of the schools of a town like this, 
in which the amount of money appropriated for school 
purposes is necessarily small, in comparison with the ap- 
propriations of cities or large towns, there is a temptation 
to be satisfied with the old and comparatively crude meth- 
ods of teaching, and to feel that if a fair amount of know- 
ledge of the common branches is secured it is all that we 
ought to expect. But it is not thus that we allow ourselves 
to view the matter. It is with us a constant studv how we 



can so order the schools as to secure the most of the best 
kind of instruction from them, without extra expense to 
the town. We have striven constantly, without introduc- 
ing any radical changes suddenly, to push up the 
standard of excellence steadily from term to term. In this 
work we have been aided to a marked degree by the co- 
operation of a great majority of the scholars, and the evi- 
dent sympathy of the parents, though we have been em- 
barrassed often by a change of teachers and the lack of 
qualification in some of them to carry out our plans A o the 
fullest extent. 

According to our estimate, the advantages of our 
schools consist only in part in the knowledge which the 
pupils derive from their text books. It should be our aim 
to, so far as possible, so conduct our schools that the pur- 
suit of knowledge will seem attractive to the scholars, that 
there may be formed in them a taste for stud}', and i 
healthful discipline of their mental faculties which will give 
them influence and power in after life. Tt has come to be 
a truism in political philosophy, that the strength < 
State depends not so much upon the number, as upon the 
intelligence of its inhabitants. 

Moreover, we believe it to be of the highest import- 
ance to so conduct the government of our schools, that 
there will be a healthful development of the best qualities 
of character in the pupils. The school is a miniature 
state. If scholars are so managed that the}' come under 
reasonable regulations in the school, if they are law abid- 
ing and conscientious there, they will be characterized by 
the same qualities as citizens. This work of discipline 
should be accomplished largely in the family, but many pa- 
rents are seemingly constitutionally unfitted to govern their 
children in a reasonable and systematic way, so that much 
remains for the public school to accomplish, if the young 
are to be fitted to be law abiding citizens. In our private 
advice to teachers, and in our more public addresses to 
the scholars, we always have this end in view. To fur- 
ther the important objects just mentioned, and to secure 
to scholars at least a slight knowledge of branches not 
formerly taught in our public schools, we have encourag- 
ed so far as feasible, the introduction of music, drawing^ 



3 

■calisthenics, (light gymnastics,) and some other general 
exercises. 

The effect of the introduction of these exercises has 
been excellent, far beyond our most sanguine anticipa- 
tions. They have quickened the enthusiasm and increas- 
ed the interest of the scholars in their study of all the other 
branches, so that we wish all of our teachers might be able 
to give instruction in music and drawing at least. But, 
that you may the better understand what has been done 
by the introduction of these branches, which are compara- 
tively new in our schools, we make a brief reference to 
each one. 

MUSIC. 

Instruction of a more or less systematic character has 
been given in all of our schools in this branch, during the 
past year. We were so fortunate at the beginning of the 
year, as to have the services of one teacher, Miss Lizzie 
S. Taylor, who is eminently qualified to give instructions 
in this branch, and we thought it a favorable opportunity 
to learn by actual experiment what amount of facility in 
singing may be acquired by the scholars of a primary 
school. The result of this experiment is, we are satisfied 
that the cases are very rare where children are not capable 
of learning to sing, if properly instructed. At the end of 
the first term there was quite a large number of scholars 
who seemed to have no ear for music, but at the close of 
the school year, there were only three or four (and two of 
these had been absent much of the time) unable to sing by 
rote, and many of them had a good degree of knowledge 
of the rudiments of the art. 

We have had musical instruments in three of the school 
rooms a part of the year, and they have been of material 
aid in conducting the musical exercises. 

DRAWING. 

We have endeavored to impart a systematic knov\l- 
edge of this art in one of our schools, but as the same 
teacher has had charge of the school no two terms, the 
conditions for such an experiment have not been very fa- 
vorable. 

Most of our teachers have used drawing cards and 



have had the drawings put upon the blackboards. The 
results from this method of instruction have been quite 
satisfactory. Map drawing is also practiced in all of our 
schools and has been found to be the most effective pro- 
cess of teaching Geography. Upon the boards in some 
of the school rooms we have seen copies of the illustra- 
tions which are found in the text books upon Physiology 
and Natural Philosophy. In many cases the copies have 
been perfect. Without reducing our instruction in this de- 
partment to any rigid system, we believe we are accom- 
plishing a good amount of work, and are attaining to a 
higher degree of excellence each term. 

CALISTHENICS. 

Ti\ese exercises have been employed in our school 8 
more, generally during the past year than hitherto. It is 
our practice to encourage teachers to introduce them to a 
reasonable extent. Such exercises quicken the circulation 
of the blood, so that more of the vital fluid passes over the 
brain and the mental activity is thereby increased. More- 
over, if scholars are required to take bodily exercise in a 
systematic way in the school room, there will not be such 
a superabundance of animal spirits when they go out, and 
they w r ill be more quiet and studious during the school 
hours. 

OTHER STUDIES AND EXERCISES. 

We have endeavored to employ every possible expe- 
dient to keep up the scholars' interest in the fundamental 
brandies of study. Instead of confining the pupils to the 
oral method of spelling, we have had them write their 
words in books to be passed in to the teacher for correc- 
tion. In some cases we have had scholars write their words 
upon the boards to be corrected by the whole class. We 
have paid considerable attention to Composition, an exer- 
cise which combines Invention, Grammar, Writing and 
Spelling. We trust this exercise will be more fully prac- 
ticed in the future than it has been in the past. The pro- 
gress of the scholars in Grammar during the past year 
has been excellent, and the progress in all the other funda- 
mental branches has been fully up to the average. The 



improvement in Reading in all our primary schools is es- 
pecially noticable. 

MORALS AND MANNERS. 

We can not pass from this part of our Report without 
calling your attention to these topics, which have engrossed 
our attention during the past few months more than ever 
before. We have received a book for examination, by A. 
M. Gow, A. M., entitled kt Good Morals and Gentle Man- 
ners,'' and we are so much pleased with it we wish it might 
be in the hands of every vouth in our town and its con- 
tents thoroughly learned. The following are some of the 
topics treated of in this work : Habits, Law, Hatred, Cour- 
age. Chastity, Veracity, Temperance, Patriotism, Duties 
of Citizenship, Cleanliness. Dress. Conversation, Beha- 
vior on the Street. Behavior in the Church and Lecture 
Room. Behavior in Travelling," &c, &c. In the preface 
are expressions setting forth theview r sof the author, which 
are so exactly our own that we quote them : 

"He believes that the true happiness and real usefulness 
of each individual depends largely upon the application of 
the principles of virtuous living. 

••He believes that moral lessons which are taught in an- 
ticipation of temptation are more profitable than those tvhich 
follow the commission of crime ; that a boy just convicted 
of stealing is not in the best frame of mind to receive his 
first lessons upon honestv. 

"He believes that all schools should be places of true 
refinement and elegant culture, and that when they are 
not they must be nurseries of vulgarity. 

•'He believes that the gentleman and lady must be 
distinguished by good manners and that good manners- 
are the outgrowth of good morals.'' 

We find it to be especially necessary to take every 
precaution to guard the purity of our scholars. It seems 
desirable that all the pupils of a school should have 
their recess at the same time, that there may be the least 
possible loss to the recitations, and that the teachers may 
have a little relaxation, as well as the scholars. But if this 
course is pursued arrangements ought to be made so that 
the sexes may be by themselves. Such an arrangement 



has been made at West Acton and has been possible at the - 
-Centre and East since the new school-houses were erected,, 
and should be made immediately in the other districts, es- 
pecially at South Acton. This is a matter of such serious 
importance as to require immediate attention. 

CHOICE OF TEACHERS. 

A review of the workings of our schools during the 
past year will make it appear that w r e have reason to con- 
gratulate ourselves that we have made so few mistakes un- 
der this head. But the qualifications requisite to the suc- 
cessful teacher are so varied that it is impossible always 
to make the right choice. Enthusiasm, tact, patience, 
and other qualities are just as essential in a teacher as a 
good education. Every teacher exerts an unconscious in- 
fluence over the scholars. It is very desirable to have in 
the teachers to whose care we commit our children all 
those gentle manners and good qualities of heart which 
we wish to see in our children when they attain to mature 
life, but it is presumptuous in us to expect in all our teach- 
ers every excellence of mind and heart. It is ever our 
aim to secure the best teachers possible with the means at 
our disposal. If we make mistakes, we only show that we 
are human like our fellowmen. When we have become 
satisfied that we have made a mistake under this head, we 
hasten to correct i£ so soon as is consistent with the princi- 
ples of justice to all concerned, and this is all that can be 
required. 

TEXT BOOKS. 

We have made no changes in text books during the 
year and have no changes to recommend. Tin* experi- 
ment of using Miss Hall's Geographies which was entered 
upon in 1<S73 has not proved entirely satisfactory, and we 
have displaced them to a considerable extent by Guyot's 
Geographies which have never been removed wholly from 
our schools. These geographies have been greatly im- 
proved during the past five years and give very good sat- 
isfaction now. 

Without dwelling upon other topics which we might 
advert to, we now invite your attention to a brief notice 
<of each school. 



CENTER GRAMMAR. 

Though this school has had a different teacher each 
term during the year, it has been favored with the best of 
instruction. 

The spring term was taught by Miss M. C. Harris, 
who has received such favorable mention in several of our 
previous reports that it is impossible for us to add anything 
here in her praise. We simply say, she put her best work 
into this school, and the scholars made excellent progress 
under her charge. 

The Fall term was taught by Miss AdaC. Davis, who 
was a member of our corps of teachers four years ago and 
was very favorably mentioned in our reports at that time. 
Since then she has had considerable, experience in teach- 
ing, and her work showed excellent results. We were 
well satisfied with her management of the school. 

The Winter term was taught by Rev. James Fletcher, 
A. M. Mr. Fletcher being; a native of this town and hav- 
ing had charge of one of the best academies in the com- 
monwealth ^several years, it would be vain for us to at- 
tempt to say anything to add to his praise. We will only 
say that he devoted all his strength and talents to his work, 
and manifested an enthusiasm which we have never seen 
excelled in a public school. The work accomplished was 
fully commensurate with the ability and the enthusiasm of 
the teacher. It was a rare opportunity for the youth of 
this district to secure the best of advantages, and we are 
happy to be able to report that they improved it to the full- 
est extent, as is verv evident from our ''Tabular View/' 

CENTER PRIMARY. 

This school was taught throughout the year by Miss 
Lizzie S. Taylor. This was Miss Taylor's first experience 
in teaching, out she devoted herself most heartily to the 
work, and soon proved her peculiar qualifications for the 
management of such a school. She secured and retained 
the love of the scholars, without any sacrifice of firmness, 
so that the order of the school constantly improved under 
her care. In another place we have spoken of her success 
in teaching music. There was also a marked improve- 



^ent in reading, spelling, and the other branches 
usually taught in a primary school. 

SOUTH GRAMMAR. 

The spring and fall terms of this school were taught 
by Miss M. E. Felton. Miss Felton did an excellent work 
in this school during both of these terms. We consider 
her one of the best of the teachers in our employ during 
the year. We would have made a strenuous effort to 
secure her services for the winter term, had it not been for 
the difficulty which attended the management of this 
.school the previous winter. We thought it advisable to 
secure a male teacher, though it may be we made a 
mistake. 

The winter term was managed^ ?) by Rev. S.O. Dyer. 
This teacher had charge of a small school in this town in 
1875. In our report of the school lie then taught we said, 
l * The school made a fair degree of progress under his 
management. He did not awaken the enthusiasm and 
arouse the ambition of the scholars quite to the degree that 
we could have desired, but we have no doubt had he con- 
tinued in charge of the school another term lie would have 
been successful to a more marked degree." Mr. D. had 
not taught for several years when he took charge of the 
other school, but he professed to have received special 
preparation for the work of teaching, and, as since then he 
has taught several terms in a neighboring town, and has 
been assistant superintendent of schools in another tow r n, 
we judged it safe to commit this school to his charge, but 
we are sorry to be obliged to report that the school was 
very far from being a success. 

It will be our most earnest care to make this school 
what it should be in the year to come, and we hope all the 
people of the district will cooperate with us in this work. 

SOUTH PRIMARY. 

This school was taught by Miss M. A. Forbush 
throughout the year. As this is the third year that Miss 
F. has had charge of this school, and as she has been 
noticed very favorably in our two last reports, we need 



only to say that she has grown constantly in our estimation 
as an earnest and enthusiastic teacher. The last examina- 
tion of her school was especially satisfactory. 

WEST GRAMMAR. 

The spring and fall terms of this school were taught 
by Miss Belle Smith, who taught the same school in the 
spring of 187G. Under Miss S. ? s instruction the order and 
general progress of the scholars in this school were 
excellent. 

The winter term was taught by Mr. j. C Bolan, A. 
B. Mr. Bolan is a graduate of Harvard College, and 
amply qualified to give instruction in a much higher grade 

diool than this. This was his first experience in teach- 
ing a public school, but he applied himself very laborious- 

. his work and gives promise, with added experien 
great excellence as a teacher. 

WEST PRIMARY. 

The spring and fall terms of this school were tai 
diss O. A. Hopkins, who had had charge of this 
school since the fall of 1874. She lias been so frequently 
mentioned in commendatory terms in the reports of this 
committee, that we need add nothing here. After a long 
and faithful service, Miss H. had the offer of a more per- 
manent position, and much to the regret of her pupils, de- 
cided to accept. 

The winter term was taught by Miss Clara L. Sweatt. 
Miss S., though young and compaiatively inexperienced, 
proved to be just the right teacher for the management of 
this school. She introduced music and calisthenics with 
excellent effect, and managed to keep the interest of the 
scholars constantly excited, so that they made rapid pro- 
gress in all their studies, and the school was a success in 
every respect. 

NORTH ACTON. 

The spring and tall terms of this school were taught 



10 

by Mrs. Allie Loker. Mrs. L. formerly taught in some of 
our schools and was always mentioned in the highest terms 
of commendation. We need only to say that her success 
in the management of this school left little to be desired. 
In her position as teacher she was the perfect embodiment 
of enthusiasm, and the scholars could not but catch her 
spirit. She was fertile in the invention of expedients to 
interest and instruct her pupils, and we seldom, if ever, 
have seen a more reasonable and devoted attachment of 
teacher and scholars than existed here. 

The winter term of this school was taught bv Miss 
Mary H, Wood, an experienced teacher of a tried reputa- 
tion. This teacher, in comparison with the one who pre- 
ceded her, seemed lacking in enthusiasm, though her 
school always appeared well; and the examination which 
closed the term was quite creditable both as regards the 
amount of knowledge gained and as regards the methods 
which, evidently, had been pursued by the teacher. 

EAST S( HOOL 

This school has been continued under the excellent 
instruction of Miss G. E. Turtle. Miss T. was mentioned 
very favorably in our last report, and we can truly say 
that she has steadily gained in excellence as an instructor. 
Her interest in the school, and the scholars' interest in her, 
seem to increase every term. The last examination was 
very creditable both to teacher and scholars. 

SOUTH EAST. 

Only two terms of school were held in this district 
during the year. The school was taught during both terms 
by Miss A. W. Packard. The number of scholars was 
quite small, but the teacher devoted herself very earnestly 
to her work and aroused the ambition and enthusiasm of 
the scholars as we never have seen them aroused before. 
This teacher is deserving of much credit and we hope her 
services may be secured again. 

Appended are the usual statistical reports. In the 
number of visits, those of the Superintendent are not in- 



11 

eluded, nor those of friends who were present at examina- 
tions. 



Respectfully submitted : 



C. A. Harrington, (chairman,) "1 

J. W. Loker, (clerk,) School 

L. Con ant, ! Committee 

D. J. Wetherbee, ' 



C. B. Stone, 
W. S. Jones, 



. °f 

Acton. 



F. P. WOOD, 

Superintendent of Schools, for the Committee. 



12 



ROLL OF HONOR. 



NOT ABSENT OR TARDY 
FOR ONE TEBM. 



NOT ABSENT OR TARDY 
FOR TWO TERMS. 



NOT ABSENT OR TARDY 
FOR THREE TERMS. 



Addie H. Barker, 
Susie E. Billings, 
Gerty L. Clark, 
Josie M. Hanuon, 
Mary I. Jackson, 
Mabel G. Pratt, 
Mabel Richardson, 
Eda F. Shapley, 
Eva C. Shapley, 
Etta C. Temple, 
S. Bertie Tuttle, 
Hiram Gates, 
James Harmon, 
Arlon U. Jackson, 
Charles Pond, 
Eddie G. Poole. 



Harry A. Fletcher, 
Lulie E. Hosmer, 
John Lynch, 
George C. Warren, 
Idella J. Barker, 
M. Florence Fletcher, 
Carrie F. Hanson, 
Ada M. Jon^s, 
Lillie F. Richardson, 
Sadie C. Sawyer, 
Carrie L. Shapley. 

Frank Cum^nings, 
John Kingsley, 
George F. Rouillard, 
George W. Tuttle. 



Jennie L. Ayers, 



SOUTH GRAMMAR. 

Carrie B. Hay ward, 
Estelle D. Heath, 
Carrie E. Jones, 
Emma A. Pratt. 



Henrietta Sawyer, 
Willie H. Wilbur. 



SOUTH PRIMARY. 

Charlie F. Wherren, 
Clara F. Leach, 
Martha C. Pratt. 



Charles W. Leach, 
A. Ernie Wilbur. 



CENTER GRAMMAR. 

Arthur Davis, 
Gilrnan Parlin, 
Horace P. Tuttle, 
Annie Hammond, 
Mary F. Waldron. 

CENTER PRIMARY 

Mary Radding, 



Sarah Hammond. 



13 



Augusta W. Smith. 



Arthur Bradford, 
Bertie Mead, 
Mary Tuttle. 



E. Elmira Ayers, 
Susie E. Couant, 
IdaF. Davis, 
Bertha J. Fisk, 
Hattie M. Robbins, 
Hattie E. Smith, 
Augusta W. Smith, 
Hattie L. Tuttle, 
Homer L. Ayers, 
Frank A. Fisk, 
Florian W. Fisk, 
J. Willie Livermore, 
Warren O. Robbins, 
Charles Rouillard, 
George Smith. 

Willie Kelley, 
Charles Holden, 
NellieWhite, 
Charles Holten, 
Charles Hopkins, 
Hattie Davis, 
Lottie Handley, 
Hattie Parker, 
Ida Resd, 
Lottie Richardson, 
Hattie Whitcomb. 

Emery Clark, 
Bertie Hall, 
Willie Hopkins, 
Ernest Kuowlton, 
Fred. Parker, 
Clesson Parker, 
Freddie Teele, 
Freddie Whitcomb, 
Bertie Willis, 
Alice Hoar. 

Annie Gallaghan, 
Minnie Harris, 
Hattie Harris, 
Annie Ryan, 
Mattie Smith. 

Freddie W. Billings, 
Willie D. Davis, 
Arthur B. Davis, 
Florence B. Perkins. 

Note.— We have had to make up this roll almost entirely from the re- 
gisters. We have tried to guard against mistakes and hope we have made 
none. In some cases scholars have been kept from school by sickness and in 
some instances they ha\e not been tardy or absent alter they began to go 
to school, but did not go the first day. We are sorry not to be able to put 
those in. But we find it necessary to adheie to a system. 



WEST GRAMMAR. 

Arthur Blanchard, 
Edwin Holten, 
Minnie Hart, 
Florence Noyes, 
Ella Teele, 
Clara Tuttle. 



WEST PRIMARY. 

Walter Gardner, 
Eugene Hall, 
Herbert Hapgood, 
Ned Holten, 
Everett Richardson, 
Alfred Richardson. 



NORTH. 

Elwin Harris, 
Everett Rouillard, 
Beitie Smith, 
Nellie Ryan. 

EAST. 

Carlton C. Conant, 
Harry G. Robbins, 
Ernest E. Wetherbee. 



Willie Hart, 
Ida Tuttle. 



Herbert H. Robbim 
Willie O. Smith. 



14 



TABULAR VIEW, 




The average attendance during the year was .88 of the whole number of schol- 
ars ; an unusually high pe rentage.' 



15 

FINANCIAL REPORT. 



SOUTH SCHOOL. 








Drawn from the treasury, 


■ $707 


00 






Received from the town of Stow, 


16 


00 






" for grass, 


1 


50 






Balance from last year, 


109 


39 


$833 


89 








Paid teachers, 


$680 ( 






" for fuel and preparing it, 


47 


53 






" for care of house and furnace, 


41 


45 






" for cleaning school house, w; 


ash- 








ing curtains, for brooms, era] 


rons 








and ink, 


15 


50 






Paid for desk books, 


5 


11 






Balance on hand, 


44 


30 


$833 


89 


C. A. HARRINGTON, 


Committee. 




WEST SCHOOL. 








Drawn from the treasury, 


$707 


00 






Balance from last year, 


18 


75 






• 






$725 


75 


Paid teachers, 


580 


00 


4t for tuel, lor preparing it, &c, 


73 


52 






" " care of house, 


45 


00 






4i 4i incidentals, broom, pail, 


re- 


• 






pairing erasers, crayons, waste 


bas- 








kets, ink, and desk books, 


12 


28 




• 


Balance on hand, 


14 


95 


$725 


75 








C B. STONE, 


Committee 




CENTER SCHOOL. 








Drawn from the treasury, 


$697 


00 






Balance from last year, 


117 


88 


$814 


88 


Paid teachers, 


$645 


75 






" for fuel. 


60 


82 






" 4t care of house, 


38 


00 






" incidentals, 


i;> 


6() 







16 

Balance on hand, 54 65 

$814 88 

L. CONANT, Committee. 

NORTH SCHOOL. 

Drawn from the treasury, $320 00 

Balance from last year, 26 64 

$346 64 
Paid teachers, 

" for fuel, preparing it, &c. 
" care of house, &c, 
Balance on hand, 

$346 64 
J. W. LOKER, Committee. 
EAST SCHOOL. 
Drawn from the treasury, $320 00 

Balance from last year, 30 59 



$260 


00 


35 


43 


12 


57 


38 


64 



Paid to teaehers, 


$295 00 


" for fuel, 


34 76 


" for incidentals, 


3 73 


" for care of house, 


12 00 


Balance on hand, 


5 10 



$350 59 



$350 59 

D. J. WETHERBEE, Committee. 
SOUTH EAST. 

Drawn from the treasury, $LS5 00 

$185 00 

Paid teacner, $165 00 

44 for fuel, 15 '2') 

" for erasers and crayons, 2 00 

" for care of house, 2 75 

$1 ( S5 00 

W. S.JONES, Committee. 
Amount raised by the town for 

schools, $2,500 00 

Income from State school fund, 183 73 

Income from dog fund, 171 <S6 

Total, $'2,X~):> W 

Number of children reported by the Assessors between 
the ages of five and fifteen, 289. Sum appropriated by the 
town for each scholar, ij8 65. 



REPORTS 



SELECTMEN AND OTHER OFFICERS 



Tom^h of <8 C t 1} 



FEB. 26, 1878, TO FEB. 26, 187S>. 



INCLUDING THE 



MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS IN 1878, 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



ACTON : 

Printed at the Office of the Acton Patriot, South Acton. 

1879. 



TOWN OFFICERS FOR 1879. 



TOWN CLERK. 

William D. Tuttle. 

SELECTMEN. 

Daniel J. Wetherbee, John White, Charles B. Stone. 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Elisha H. Cutler, John White. Frank Hosmer. 

ASSESSORS. 
William D. Tuttle, Phineas Wetherbee. 

HIGHWAY SURVEYORS. 

Daniel Wetherbee, Charles Wheeler, Abram H. Jones. 

George E. Keyes, 0. W. Mead. 

FENCE VIEWERS. 

John Fletcher, 2d, John R. Houghton. Nahum C. Reed. 

SURVEYORS OF LUMBER. 

Levi W. Stevens, Ed. F. Richardson, Chas. B. Stone. 

Francis Dwight, Geo. H. Harris. Wm. B. Davi*. 

Elbridge Bobbins* E. J. Bobbins. 

SURVEYORS OF WOOD. 

Lucius S. Hosmer, S. L. Dutton. CUas. B. Stone. 

E. J. Robbinp, Jona. W. Loker, Geo. H. Harris, 

Wm. B. Davis, Geo. H. Warren. Moses E. Taylor, 

Henry D. Parlin. 

SURVEYORS OF HOOPS AND STAVES. 

David M. Handley, Jos. Dole, Wm. Reed. 

FIELD DRIVERS. 

Dr. C. B. Sanders. Geo. R. Keyes, Chaa. L. Beck. 

CEMETERY COMMITTEE. 

John Fletcher, Jr., Joseph F. Cole, William W. Davis. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

George F. Flagg, J. W. Loker, Luther Conant, D. J. Wetherbee. 

0. B. Stone, W. S. Jones. 

F. P. Wood, Superintendent of Schools. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



Appropriations and Receipts. 

Unexpended balance of last year, 83.717 09 



Regular Town Grant, 




8,000 00 


" forHigl 


iways, 


1,500 00 


" " " " Schools, 


2.500 00 


State Tax, 




720 00 


County " 




520 10 


Overlayings, 




476 20 


Liquor Licenses, 




351 00 


Cash of Daniel Harris, 




500 00 


Mt. Hope Cemetery. 




* 15 00 


Corporation Tax, 




397 94 


National Bank Tax, 




501 47 


State Aid to Jan. 1, 1878, 




96 00 


Cash of Chas. Wheeler, 




9 00 


Town Hall Receipts, 




79 17 


Woodlawn Cemetery, 




38 83 


Town of Weston, burial of R. 


Fisk, 


26 00 


State School Fund, 




182 37 


Dog Fund, 




176 40 




1 QlC'jOUU >) i 



/ 



Support of Schools. 

Paid C. B. Stone, West District, 8681 21 

C. A. Harrington, So. " 681 21 

Luther Conant, Centre " 676 37 



Paidl. W. Flagg, East District, 308 11 

G. H. Harris, North " 308 11 

W. S. Jones, So. East " 200 00 



Repairs on Town Buildings . 

Paid Luther Conant, Centre School House, $15 96 
I. W. Flagg, East " " 2 04 
L. U. Holt- 
Furnace and Pipe for Town Hall, 20 87 
Labor, 1 25 
16 feet Pipe for West School House. 2 00 
8 Elbows," 1 00 

2 lbs. Galvanized Pipe. 40 

3 lbs. Zinc. 27 
Labor, 2 00 

G. L. Townc, — 

Reoairs on West School llou.-e. 11 65 



10 00 

6 74 

3 15 

3 00 

1877-78, 8 60 



Repairs on Highways. 

Paid A. H. Jones, Breaking Roads, 1878, $22 

H. Haynes, " ' 2 47 

J. Fletcher. 

' J. C. Wheeler, " 
G. A. Hayward, " 
G, R. Keyes, 
F. H. Whitcomb, < ; 

" " Willows for setting, 5 00 

Chas. Wheeler, repairs on J. McCarthy's 

road. 14 00 

Chas. Wheeler, Breaking Roads, 1878, 7 80 
A Bullette. " " " 7 73 

Edwin Tattle, " " " 9 15 

Samuel Hosmer, " u " 3 34 

Luke Tuttle, " t; " 6 90 



$2,855 01 



$58 04 



Paid Nahum Littlefield, Breaking Roads,1878, 1 60 

Moses Taylor, " :i " 3 15 
J. E. Billings, Repairing Washout near 

I. W. Flagg's, 12 75 

J. E. Billings, Railing Highways, 36 51 

Silas Conant, " " 27 83 
Daniel Harris, Repairing Bridge near 

I. W. Flagg's, 2 50 
Daniel Harris, Iron, Sharpening Drills, 

and Posts for Rails, . 25 27 

D. J. Wetherbee, Iron for Railings, 17 36 

J. E. Reed, Lumber " " 41 43 

George Chandler, Breaking Roads, 1878, 9 60 



Regular Highway Work. 

A. II. J0!NE3, SURVEYOR. 

For 67 3-4 Days Work at 2 00, 8135 50 

" oxen at 2 00, 112 50 

" horses at 1 00, 113 50 

" L. Jones, at 1 50, 96 37 

" A. Cole, 78 38 

11 D. Cronan, 96 37 

» W. P. Wilbur, 36 74 

" Bulette, 5 25 

" Murphy, 2 25 

" Quinlan, 3 00 

" H. Lewis, 1 50 

" D. Rynn, 1120 

Lumber for Railings, 5 53 

Sluiceways, Plank, Scrajoer, &c., 9 74 

CHARLES WHEELER, SURVEYOR. 

For 68 1-4 Days Work, at 2.00, 136 50 

56 3-4 " « oxen, at 2.00, 113 50 

127 " " horses, at 1.00, 127 00 



56 1-4 


u 


113 1-2 


a 


64 1-4 


u 


52 1-4 


« 


64 1-4 


« 


24 1-2 


tt 


3 1-2 


(I 


11-2 


u 


2 


('. 


1 


(. 


6 3-4 


ti 



$291 47 



8706 75 



6 



For 60 1-4 days work, C. H. Wheeler, 1.50, 90 38 
75 1-4 " " A. Smith, 112 89 



57 3-4 " 


a 


J. Waldron, 


86 63 


15 3-4 « 


a 


T. Donahue, 


23 63 


1 


(( 


Silas Conant, 


1 50 


19 


a 


E. O'Neal, 1.00, 


19 00 


9 1-4 « 


it 


1.25, 


11 56 


4 


(( 


Moses Taylor, 1.50, 


6 00 


1-5 " 


u 


G. T. Knowlton, 


25 


Powder, 






9 50 


Fuse, 






1 80 


Scraper, 






6 25 


44 lbs. Castings, 

S. A. Guilford, Blacksmithing. 

D. Harris, " 

E. A. Phalen, 

" Scraper Plate, 
Planks, 


2 67 
65 
4 34 
6 53 
6 50 
1 50 


Luther Conant 


. use 


of Plow, 


50 









By Order of County Commissioners. 

Paid Wm. Reed, for Stone Bounds, $6 00 

A. H. Jones, work on So. Acton Road, 670 55 
Chas. Wheeler, do. 392 92 

A. C. Piper, Railings for " « 5 00 



Support of Poor. 

Paid E. H. Cutler, balance due Town Farm 

April 1, 1878, $301 43 

E. H. Cutler, on account expenses 

the present year, 164 50 

E. H. Cutler, for support of — * 

Clara Wheeler, 32161 

John Carney, 115 27 

George J. Dole, 26 71 



$769 08 



$1,074 47 



John Dakin, 63 00 

Traynor Family, 83 36 

Burial expense of Traynor child, 1876, 11 00 

Lucy Oliver, 6 24 



Sarah B. Child, 


13 50 


Patrick Sullivan, 


2 00 


Lucy Hosmer, 


6 25 


Michael McMurphy, 


8 00 


Levi Chamherlin, 


13 52 


Betsey Chaffin, 


163 75 


Burial expense of Robert Fisk, 


26 00 



Journey to Needham, respecting G.J. Dole, 3 00 

" W.F.Whitney 3 00 

" Boston respecting J. Carney, 1 50 

" Worcester ' ; Clara Wheeler, 3 50 

Stationery and Postage, 75 



Town Debt. 

Paid Joseph Noyes, Note and Interest, $213 33 

Concord Bank, " " 3,606 75 

Daniel Harris, 500 00 



State Aid. 

Paid R. C. Wright, $48 00 

Hattie W. Wilder, 48 00 



Indigent Soldiers' Aid. 

Paid William Reed, $42 00 

W. F. Wood, 70 00 

Benj. Skinner, 22 00 

E. H. Cutler for B. Skinner, 47 12 

" " « J. Carney, 140 97 

Allen Smith, 8 00 



$1,337 89 



$4,320 08 



896 00 



$330 09 



Cemetery Expenses. 

Paid John Fletcher, Jr., for labor and ma- 
terial for Woodlawn, 8168 38 
R. R. Fletcher, Trees, 
John Blood, Hay for mulching trees. 
Ai Robbins, Building Wall, 
Silas Conant, Labor, 
Calvin Harris. Mud, 
J. F. Rouillard, Stone, 
J. F. Cole, Labor, Mount Hope, 
" « Seats, 

Town Officers. 

PaidF. P. Wood. Supt. Schools, 1877-78. 850 00 
Reuben L. Reed, Sealer Weights and 



63 


00 


10 


90 


223 


10 


76 


12 


2 


50 


8 


00 


40 


50 


10 


61 



Measures, 1876-1877. 


20 00 


Francis Dwidit. Collector Taxes, 


, 1877, 50 00 


F. P. Wood, Supt. Schools in pai 


t, 1878, 45 00 


P. Wetherbee, Assessor, 


30 00 


A. C. Handley, « 


25 00 


Wm. D. Tuttle, " 


30 00 


" " Town Clerk, 


25 00 


D. J. Wetherbee, Selectman, 


70 00 


John White, " 


45 00 


C. B. Stone, 


45 00 


Francis Dwight, Supt. Burials, '. 


1878, 81 00 






Interest od Town Debt. 


J K. Putney, 


S39 00 


I. T. Flagg, 


12 00 


Concord Bank, 


105 00 


F. Rouillard, 


150 00 


Philip Peters, 


24 00 


Mary P. Hosmer, 


60 00 


Daniel Harris, 


48 00 



8603 11 



$516 00 



id D. J. Wetherbee, 


34 51 


Joseph Noyes, 


60 00 


Calvin Harris, 


12 00 


J. Piper, 


36 00 


J. E. Billings, 


201 96 


Harriet Davis. 


30 00 


Daniel Harris, 


10 IT 


David M. Handley, 


180 00 


G. H. Harris, 


6 00 


Sarah C. Noyes, 


48 00 


Thomas F. Noyes, 


24 00 


Luther Billings, 


24 00 







Miscellaneous. 

Paid H. M. Smith, Repairing Town Clock, 5 50 

M. Coffee, Damage received on highway, 20 00 
C. W. Leach, printing 500 Selectmen's 

Reports, 17 00 

C. W. Leach, " 12 Warrants, 1 25 

" " li Town Reports, do 00 

W. W. Worster, Repairing Hearse, 7 75 

F. P. Wood, School Books for poor 

children, 1 25 

Dr. Dwight Russell, Black Bass for 

stocking Magog Pond, 
Waldo Littlefield, Painting, 
J. Cole, digging well, 

C. B. Stone, brick, cement, pump and 
platform, 

D. J. Wetherbee, license blanks, 

<>. u 0Y fe r « 

" " screens for Town House, 5 40 

a tc coa l « « « 21 45 

" " lease of Magog Pond, 10 00 

" " recording By-Laws, 3 90 



136 


25 


21 


00 


36 


00 


46 


81 


1 


50 


1 


25 



81,104 6 



10 



Paidl. W. 


Flagg, iron for railings, 


9 44 


Wm. 


D. Tuttle 


, express, 


1 95 


<( 


u 


laying avenues East 








Cemetery, 


4 50 


u 


it 


registering deed So. 








school, • 


1 95 


a 


(< 


postage and stationery, 


1 97 


it 


u 


setting glass and screens 








in Town House cellar, 


1 4G 


u 


u 


journey to Concord, 








election returns, 


1 50 


d 


u 


journey to Boston, 








Tax Commissioners, 


1 50 


a 


u 


recording 23 births, 


11 50 


u 


a 


" 10 marriages, 


1 50 


a 


a 


" 30 deaths, 


5 00 


A. C. 


Handley, 


2 Assessors' books, 


42 



J. W. Fiske, opening Town Hall 39 times, 29 25 

11 " care of clock, 10 00 

" " " " cellar, 3 00 

" " repairing clock, 1 40 

labor cleaning vault, &c, 1 90 

express on chimneys, 25 

stove for Lower Hall, 8 00 

1 barrel oil, 10 63 

1 cord of wood, 5 50 
cutting same, 2 00 
cleaning Hall, 2 00 

2 combs, 15 
matches, 10 

S. Robbins, 1 day's work on Town House, 1 50 

11 lumber, 2 22 

E. Forbush, burying horse and remov- 
ing rubbish, 1 75 

Francis Dwight, Tax Book, 1 00 

" " enforcing dog law, 4 50 



u 


a 


u 


a 


a 


a 


a 


n 


u 


u 


a 


u 


u 


(( 


u 


(( 


t 


it 



11 



Francis Dwight, making returns of 26 

deaths, 6 50 

11 " coffin and burial ex- 

pense of A. S. 
Bergendahl, 15 00 



$542 15 



Receipts from February 26, 1878, to February 26, 1879. 

Unexpended balance as per report of Feb. 

26, 1878, $3,717 09 

Appropriations and Receipts, 16,089 48 





ires. 


<^j.«y,^>vv/ ui 


Expenditi 




Support of Schools, 




$2,855 01 


Repairs on Town Buildings, 




58 04 


" " Highways. 




291 47 


Regular Highway Work, 




1,475 83 


By Order of County Commissioners, 


1,074 47 


Support of Poor, 




1,337 89 


Town Debt, 




4,320 08 


State Aid, 




96 00 


Indigent Soldiers' Aid, 




330 09 


Cemetery Expenses, 




603 11 


Town Officers, 




516 00 


Interest on Notes, 




1,104 64 


Miscellaneous, 




542 15 


State Tax, 




720 00 


County Tax, 




520 10 


State Treasurer, Liquor Licenses, 




87 75 


Francis Dwight, Discount, 1878, 




689 55 

$16 6°° 18 






Balance in Treasury, Feb. 26, 


1879, 
Notes 


$3,184 39 


Town Debt. 


3. 


Daniel Harris, 




$819 33 


D. J. Wetherbee, 




595 41 



12 



J. E. Billings, 
I. T. Flagg, 

Calvin Harris, 
Luther Billings, 
J. K. Putney, 
Joseph Barker, 
J. A. Piper, 
D. M. Handley, 
Philip Peters, 
J. A. Piper, 
G. H. Harris, 
Frederic Rouillard, 
Sarah C. Noyes, 
Thomas F. Noyes, 
M. P. Hosmer, 
Harriet Davis, 



Amount due from State Aid, $96 00 

" " iC cc Indigent Soldiers' 

Aid, 330 09 

" " " Town Treasurer, 3,184 39 



3,440 96 


105 


41 


202 


63 


405 49 


686 


94 


1,019 


24 


205 


16 


3,046 


50 


1,570 


70 


404 


m 


100 


00 


2,606 69 


800 


00 


400 


00 


1,039 


33 


506 4 




$17,954 86 



$3,610 48 



Balance against the Town, $14,344 38 

D. J. WETHERBEE,"} Selectmen 
JOHN WHITE, }■ of 

CHAS. B. STONE, J Acton. 
Acton, Feb. 26, 1879. 



13 



REPORT OF THE 

RECEIPTS and EXPENDITURES 

AT THE ALMSHOUSE IN ACTON, 
For tlae Year Ending April 1st, 1879. 



ARTICLES ON HAND APRIL 1, 1879. 



10 cows, 
1 horse, 

13 tons hay, 

Hu.ks, 

550 lbs. cotton meal, 

400 lbs. meal, 

500 lbs. shorts, 

60 bush, corn, 

Bags, 

Calfskin, 

3 shouts, 

12 cords wood cut for 

30 bens, 

Lumber, 

40 barrels, 

Boxes*, 

15 bbl. apples, 

70 bush, potatoes, 

100 lbs. ham, 



;425 00 
115 00 
195 

2 



4 

4 



stove, 



00 

00 
60 
00 

25 
3G 00 
3 00 

75! 
18 00. 
60 00 
15 00 
10 00 



50 
00 



15 00 
56 00 
11 00 



380 lbs salt pork, 

I pork barrel, 

Vinegar, 

Salt pickles, 

Beets, 

Soap. 

110 lbs. lard, 

Butter, 

20 lbs. tea, 

Flour. 

Salt, 

Sugar, 

Spices, 

Candles, 

Crackers, 

10 lbs. dried apples, 

Oyster shells, 



RECEIPTS FROM TOWN FARM 1878. 

Received for milk, 



$575 54 Received for eggs, 



apples. 685 15 


" potatoes, 


Bowker fund, 25 00 


" tobacco, 


cows, 123 00 


l< butter, 


boarding B. Skinner, 47 12 


" poultry, 


" M. C. Murphy, 4 00 




berries, 12 00 




calves, 7 50 





$38 00 



1 
5 
1 
] 
1 
11 
2 
6 
3 
1 



50 
50 
00 
00 
80 
00 
00 
80 
00 
00 
50 
30 
25 
75 
80 
30 



$1057 00 

S2 12 

98 90 

1 60 

6 32 

4 34 

$1,592 59 



14 





EXPENSES. 




r tea, 


$24 7£ 


1 Paid for soap, 


$2 68 


cloth and clothing, 


63 5S 


' almanac, 


06 


crackers, 


31 66 


► rope, 


08 


cream tartar, 


3 3C 


printers' ink, 


1 27 


sugar, 


32 92 


seeds, 


43 


tobacco, 


13 52 


twine, 


24 


fish, 


11 65 


cheese, 


7 31 


pails, 


45 


sal soda, 


10 


axes, 


1 70 


Bristol brick, 


10 


coffee, 


3 12 


clothes pins, 


20 


crockery, 


1 99 


vinegar, 


50 


peas, 


1 03 


oat meal, 


1 20 


yeast, 


96 


j u g> 


20 


axe helves, 


92 


shoes, 


9 44 


spices, 


2 94 


phosphate, 


26 25 


beans, 


4 13 


whetstone, 


08 


mustard, 


90 


blueing, 


20 


dried apple, 


4 68 


oil can, 


67 


Paris green, 


1 90 


sage, 


45 


brush, 


15 


cards, 


45 


malt, 


40 


shovel, 


56 


faucet, 


06 


shells, 


68 


brooms, 


1 05 


eggs. 


1 00 


mops, 


50 


expres marketing, 


13 10 


chimneys, 


80 


labor, 


230 70 


shade, 


25 


boxes. 


30 


butter, 


67 20 


washing fluid, 


30 


prunes, 


36 


cushion, 


1 75 


spoons, 


1 27 


cash rendered paup 


's, 2 75 


onions, 


1 15 


tinware, 


2 31 


starch, 


11 


straw, 


50 


grain, 


344 58 


use of team, 


14 75 


meat. 


84 14 


stove, 


18 00 


wicks, 


26 


blankets for tramp 


oil 


8 79 


room, 


13 50 


corks, 


40 


butchering, 


4 00 


snuff 


32 


barrels, 


125 75 


nails, 


2 38 


castings, 


3 75 


apple header, 


1 17 


cider, 


3 52 


mustard, 


2 05 


repairing shoes, 


2 07 


sulphur, 


08 


4 ' harness, 


2 75 


baskets, 


1 92 


" pump, 


2 00 


paper, 


15 


lantern, 


1 00 


flour, 


74 05 


pasturing cows, 


27 00 


molasses, 


9 10 


cows, 


100 00 



15 



Paid for saleratus, 


1 


10 


Paid for axe, 90 


salt, 


5 


89 


pigs, 9 00 


rice, 


1 


12 


blacksmith bill, 13 18 


corn stare b, 




24 


Dr. Sanders' bill, 13 25 


raisins, 




88 


coffin and robe for 


glycerine, 




30 


Sarah Bowker, 13 00 


chalk, 




02 


services of N. S. 


lemons, 




bS 


Brooks, 350 00 


lard. 


1 


14 


services of E. H. 


candles, 


1 


50 


Cutler, 50 00 


sweet potatoes, 


1 


80 


John White. 10 00 


medicine. 


4 


16 


Thomas P. Sawyer, 3 00 


rye meal, 




25 






saltpetre, 




32 


$1,079 01 



Total amount of Expenditures, 
41 ' ; Receipts, 

Deficiency, 

Balance due as per report of the Overseers of the Poor, 
April 1, 1878, 



Drawn from the Treasurer balance due 

April'l, 1878, $301 43 

Drawn from the Treasurer for use on farm 

1878-1879, 164 50 



$1,919 14 
1,592 59 

$326 55 

301 43 

$627 98 



465 93 



Balance due April 1, 1879 

Deficiency, 26 55 

Interest on farm, 240 00 

Victualing 372 tramps at 40 cents, 

Cost of supporting poor on farm, 



SI 62 05 



$566 55 
148 80 

$417 75 



Whole number of persons, exclusive of tramps, supported in Alms 
house, 8 ; average number, 6 ; present number, 6. 



ELTSHA H. CUTLER, ) Overseers 
JOHN WHITE, }■ of 

THOMAS P. SAWYER, ) Poor. 



16 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT FOR 1878. 



Births in Acton in 1878. 

No. Date of birth. Name of child. Nam^s of parents. 

1. Jan. 31, Rebecca Bradley, daughter of Dennis and Hannah 

Bradley. 

2. Feb. 12, James O'Neil, son of Patrick and Hannah O'Neil. 

3. Feb. 24, Edward Wellington Bich, son of Edward S. and M. 

Alice Bich. 

4. Mar. 10, Edua Augusta Knowlton, daughter of George T. and 

Clara E. Knowlton. 

5. Mar. 15, Bertha Mav Newton, daughter of Theron F. and Anna 

A. Newton. 
G. Mar. 18, Joseph Dennis Donahue, sou of Timothy and Bridget 
Donahue. 

7. Mar. 24, Frank Herman Tuttle; son of Julian and Hannah E. 

Tuttle. 

8. May 4, William Peters, sou of Philip and Margaret Peters. 

9. May 8, Thomas Manion, son of Thomas and Mary M. Manioc. 

10. May 25, George W. Potter, son of George and Lizzie Potter. 

11. July 20, Frank Jones, son of William S. and Laura A. Jones. 

12. July 25, Frank Elbridge Hapgood, son of Hiram J. and Augusta 

A. Hapgood. 

13. July 25, Bertha Jane Parker, daughter of Edwin C. and Hannah 

H. Parker. 

14. Aug. 27, Sheldon Ellsworth Littlefield, son of Hanson A. and 

Florence M. Littlefield. 

15. Sept. 8, Florence Ethel Wayne, daughter of Robert and Lizzie A. 

Wayne. 

16. Sept. 14, John Albert Hay ward, son of George A. and Susan E. 

Hay ward. 



17 

17. Sept. 27. Avis Vesta Fowler, daughter of Loring N. and Addie 

M. Fowler. 

18. Sept 29, Augustine Bradford Conant, sou of Luther and S. Au- 

gusta Conant. 

19. Oct. 22, Sara A. Word, daughter of Rev. Franklin P. and Abby 

0. w 

20. Oct. 25. Jacob H. ftockendoiff, son of Jacob and Martha A. 

Dockendorfif. 

21. . . :. son nf George W. and H. Isa- 

bella Elliott. 

ert E. Wil ' f Edward and Ora A 

23. Nov. 24. Car] Markland Worcester, son of Charles E. and Louise 
S. Worc< 



Marriages Kecorded in Acloas iia 187S. 

No. DateofMarri Names and residence ol 

1. Jan. 16, ' and Miss Julia A. Crockett I K>'h of 

Acton, 

2. June 19, Mr Edwin M. Wheeler of Boston, and Miss Ellen G. 

Hoar of Acton. 

3. Aug. 10, Mr. Georgn W. Barnard of Stow, and Miss Catherine # 

Doodv of Harvard. 
-1. Sept. 4, Dr. Charles B. Sanders and Miss Lizzie S. Taylor, both 
of Acton. 

5. Sept. 8, Mr. Frank Marshall and Miss Ada I. Jones, both of 

Acton. 

6. Oct. 16, Mr. Robert C. Dickinson of Groton, and Miss Laura J. 

Hosmer of Acton. 

7. Nov. 13, Mr Charles L. Beck of Acton, and Miss Lulu Adelaide 

Proctor of Needham. 

8. Dec. 4, Mr. Walter H. Whitney of Boston and Miss Georgia E. 

Tuttle of Acton. 

9. Dec. 13, Mr. Charles D. Griggs of Acton, and Mrs. Sarah Jane 

Jewett of Groton. 
10. Dec. 20, Mr. George R. Keyes of Acton, and Miss Mayetta E. 
Tubbs of Gillsura. N. H. 



1J8 
DeatBis in Acton nil 1878. 

No. Date of Death. Names and Ages of Deceased. 

1. Jan. 8. Mr. Charles F. Richardson, aged 02 years, 4 months, 23 

days. 

2. Jan. 9, Rva Bassett, daughter of Joseph R. and Clara Bassett, 

aged 4 years, 1 1 months, G days. 

3. Jan 28, Howard W. Hesselton, son of Lucius A. and Martha F. 

Hesselton, aged 2 months, 5 days. 
.'. Feb. 1, Mabel E. Stone, daughter of Charles B. and Marietta C. 

Stone, aged 6 year*, 2 months. 2 days. 
5. Feb. 21, Mr. William Shattuck, aged 85 years, (i months, 20 days. 
fi. Mar. 10, Mrs. Harriet Tuttle, widow of ir,tle. Esq., 

aged 82 years, 6 months, G days. 
7. Mar. 12, Mr. Archibald Turpening. aged 26 years. 
;8. Mar. 12, Mr. Lowell Foster, aged 27 years. 

April 4, Mr. Robert . 'ears* 2 months, 15 day*. 

10. April 10, Mrs. Henrietta C. Cummii Mr. M. B. C. 

Cummings, aged 39 years. 11 months, 2-J days. 

11. April 10, Mr. Lorenzo C. And:; 8 days 

12. June 12, Mr. A. S. Bergendahl, • s. 

13. July 14. Marietta Morin, daughter of Joseph C and Lucy D. 

Morin, aged 1© months. 
14 July 16, Mr. Nathan Ghaffin, as»ed 77 years, -. 17 days. 

15. Aug. 8. Charles Edw n Nelson, son of Oscar and Mary' Ann Nel- 

so!;, aged 2 years, 4 month, 18 days. 

16. Sept. ft, Mr. Leonard Bulette, aged 49 years. 7 months, 26 day-. 

17. Sept. 17, Mrs. Manila A. Conant. wife of Francis Conant, aged 

4(3 years, 9 months, 2 days. 

18. Sept. 21, Deacon Albert Hay ward, aged 64 years, 7 months. 

19. Sept. 24, Bertha Jane Parker, daughter of Bdwin C. and Hannah 

II. Parker, aged 2 months. 

20. Oct. 4, Mr. Thomas Taylor, aged 72 years, 1 month, 24 days. 

21. Oct. 11, Mrs. Catherine E. Worster, wife of W. W. Worster, 

aged 42 years, 10 months, 1 1 days. 

22. Oct. 14, Mr. Philip Peters, aged 45 years. 

23. Oct. 19, Mr. Alonzo W. Moore, aged 32 years, 9 months. 

24. Oct. 28, Mr. William W. Worster, aged 50 years, 1 month, 17 

days. 



19 

25. Nov. 5, Miss Mary M. Withington, aged 57 years, 6 months, 24 

days. 
20. Nov. 13, Mrs. Sarah F. Bowker, aged 83 years. 

27. Nov. 1G, Mr. William C. Mansfield, aged GO years, 2 months, 3 

days. 

28. Dec. 1, Miss Submit Wheeler, aged 75 years, 3 months, 20 days. 

29. Dec. 8, Mrs. Martha T. Davis, wife of William W. Davis, aged 

53 years, 5 months, 2 days. 

30. Dec. 28, Mrs. Sarah Ptouillard, wife of Frederic Bouillard, aged 

58 years, 11 months, 1 day. 



•>() 



NAMES OF PERSONS HAYING DOGS LICENSED IN 1S7S. 



;•>; s. Augusta H< 

gton, 
zo L. Tuttle, 
Edwii 

:is Dwisbt 2., 
ker, 
F.Haywai 

Myron F. Go 
wn, 
Taylor I 

» Mead, . 

Mrs. II > 

JValdo Tutl 

Henrj 

Eiv«n Tuttle, 
Elnathan Jones 
Charles Handu 
Geo. C. Wright, 

m F. Newton, 
nrrie, 

n S. Fletcher, 
Aaron C. Han.' 
Andrew J. Willis, 



IJohn Temp e, 

John We cli. 
Daniel Har i-, 
Geo. R. K- i--. 
Le< i Houghton, 
Fuller, 

Daniel .1. Y> 
John W ( lha lei . 

• Mou l n, 

Jr., 

■ 
John D Moulti . 

John W 

A. Robbi 

Willie F. Kichardson, 

Luc mer, 

("ha: !••- \Y eel< r, 

Johu Fletcb 

B. A. L-ttletield, 
Frank E Harris, 

92 Males at f2.00=$184 
;J Females at $5.0 



Jas E. Richardson, 

Lyman C. 1 
John II W. tu 
Iron, 
Patrick 
Frank P 
P. P 
Henry li i 

[nowltou, 

Wall. 

g . 
L~\i W 
\ Smith, 

. 

Ba 1. 
[saiah S. L**ach, 
Frank Mar: 

Preston, 

Char] ant, 



Total, 95 
Acton, March 15, 1S79. 



. $199.00 
WM. D. TUTTLE, Town Clerk, 



ANNUAL REPOET 

OF THE 

School Committee ITown of Acton 



FOP. 



SCHOOL YEAR, 1878-9 



To The Citizens of Acton : — 

In accord with, a wise provision of the statutes of this 
Commonwealth, your School Committee and the Superin- 
tendent of Schools respectfully submit the following report : 

We consider it highly proper that you who appropri- 
ate the money by which our schools are supported and 
who commit your children to our schools to be instructed 
in the most necessary branches of knowledge under our 
direction, should be fully informed, not only in respect to 
the particular management of each school in town, but 
also as to the general principles of the system of education 
which is practiced in the conduct of all our schools at the 
present time. For this reason we have endeavored to 
make this report the farthest possible from being a mere 
matter of form, to satisfy the technical provision of the 
statute law, and, in its composition, have endeavored to 
set before you without any reserve whatever, the principles 
by which we have been governed in all our actions as re- 
gards the supervision of the schools of this town, during 
the past year. Before we enter upon a statement of these 
principles, we wish to state that we have adopted them as 
he basis of our actions after much careful reflection and a 



•2 

considerable observation of the unsatisfactory or positively 
harmful results of other methods. We do not claim that 
our ideas upon common school education are perfect or 
beyond dispute, but we do claim that they are the result of 
much thought, of a considerable experience in teaching 
and of no small amount of observation of the practical 
conduct of schools. 

That our ideas upon this important subject may be 
before you in the most definite form possible we divide 
them into topics as follows : 1st — The aim of our Schools. 
2d — Methods of Instruction. 3d — Methods of Discipline. 
4th — Text Books. 5th — Treatment of Teachers. 

THE AIM OF OUR SCHOOLS. 

This is a most important topic ; but how few persons 
there are who are most vitally interested in our schools 
who ever gave it any serious consideration ! Were the 
question, "what is the aim of our schools?" to be put to any 
company of our citizens the answer would be with but few 
exceptions, "The aim of our schools is to impart knowl- 
edge to the scholars," and this would be given as a suffi- 
cient answer. But as we look upon it, this is only a part 
of what ought to be the beneficial work of our schools. In 
order that these institutions may be most successful, it is 
necessary that the matter of self control and mental dis- 
cipline should not be overlooked. Moreover, it is not the 
amount of knowledge which a pupil seems to come into 
possession of that determines his success as a scholar, but 
it is the thoroughness with which he has learned what he 
has attempted, especially as regards the fundamental prin- 
ciples of the branches of knowledge taught, which is the 
important thing. Take for example a class commencing 
written arithmetic ; if that class in one term can become 
so versed in the study as to express any number in figures 
with the most perfect readiness, and can read numbers 
with a similar facility and can add columns of figures with 
something of the same ease that an accountant can, that 
amount of knowledge will be of far more service to him 
than the comparitively imperfect knowledge of the study 
which he would have gained in going over a very much 
larger portion of the book, for he will be able to perform 
arithmetical processes which he will find it necessary to 



3 

perform almost every day in his business life in half the 
time and with a far greater certainty of being correct than 
would have been possible had it not been for the thorough- 
ness of his mental work in this part of arithmetic, and yet 
there is not a parent in this town who would be satisfied 
with this amount of apparent progress in the scholar's 
study. 

What may be said of arithmetic is equally true of the 
other branches of knowledge which are taught in our 
schools. If scholars are allowed to be content with sim- 
ply a superficial knowledge of their studies, they will fail 
to acquire a habit of persistent thoroughness which would 
be of the greatest service to them in the future. 

Another aim of our schools is to secure to the scholars 
a facility in expressing what they know, such as they 
would not otherwise possess, and this is almost as impor- 
tant to a person's success in life as the possession of knowl- 
edge. For this reason we consider it just as much a teacher's 
duty to see to it that the scholars express themselve.s con- 
cisely and correctly as that the}' commit their lessons per- 
fectly. 

Another aim of our schools is to develop in the schol- 
ars the power of self control, and to inspire them v 
habits of obedience, so that they will be more obedient in 
the family and more law abiding in the state. Said a 
parent .to us not a long time since, "I can tell very quick- 
ly whether the scholars in our school are kept under 
proper restraint or not by the conduct of my boys at home. 
When the order of the schools is good, they are easily man- 
aged at home; and are pleasant when corrected ; but when 
it is not, and they are given a loose rein there, it is just 
the reverse." In this respect we consider the service of 
our common schools, if properly managed. invalua- 
ble. 

In short, it is the aim of our sehools to prepare the 
young in every particular to go out into society and take 
their places in it as law abiding and useful members, fur- 
nished with the most necessary elements of knowledge, 
and so disciplined as to be able to make the best use of 
what they know, and we should strive to accomplish these 
results to the fullest extent possible. 



METHODS OF INSTRUCTION. 

Just as there are several systems of medicine, each 
claiming an equal degree of success in the treatment of 
disease, so there are various methods of instruction which 
have the indorsement of educators of unquestioned ability. 
The method which is employed in most of our higher in- 
stitutions of learning at the present time is what may be 
termed' 'Recitation by Topics." According to this method, 
few questions are asked and the scholar is thrown entirely 
upon his own resources for a successful recitation. If a 
scholar were to pass thoroughly through a text book, ac- 
cording to this method, he would be able, at the close of 
his study of it, to give the contents of the whole book with- 
out any question being asked. For scholars who have re- 
ceived a considerable degree of mental discipline, this is 
an admirable method and is always attended with the best 
results. 

'But our experience with this method in our common 
schools has convinced us that it is not the most advanta- 
geous method in them. We have found that the tax on 
the memory of scholars whose retentive faculties are not 
very strong is so great that they become discouraged and 
pursue the study with no pleasure but the reverse, and 
that it is the tendency of the scholars who are easy to 
learn to commit the exact language of the book and recite 
it, parrot-like, so associating the ideas of the subject with 
the language of the text book that when the T exact lan- 
guage is forgotten all the knowledge which it conveyed is 
lost. For these reasons we have found the practice of rec- 
itation by questions far preferable to any other method. 

This as it seems to us is the most natural method of 
training for scholars who expect to have no particular use 
for their knowledge except in ordinary business, for they 
will find it practically the case in the future, that it is in 
answer to questions, that they need to have their knowledge 
in an available shape. Some one asks, "Why the need of 
plying the scholars with so many questions in our schools ?" 
We reply, this is necessary to afford them facility in an- 
swering the practical questions which will arise every day 
in their lives. If our scholars were to be public lecturers or 
essayists, we would prefer some other method, but as they 



are to be practical men and women, whose great need of 
knowledge is to fit them to solve problems and answer ques- 
tions which will arise every day, we think the method of 
recitation by questions is the most natural one. 

Moreover, we have found that this method is better 
than any other in stimulating our scholars to study their les- 
sons, and it is such stimulus that most of our scholars 
especially need. The proportion of scholars in any of our 
schools who have such a natural thirst for knowledge that 
they would study without anything to stimulate them is 
very small. It is one of the principal duties (or ought to 
be) of every teacher to excite an interest in study in the 
minds of the scholars, so that they will give the applica- 
tion to their books which is necesserv to any degree of 
success. If a scholar knows that certain questions are to 
be asked him, he will apply himself to the study of their 
answers as he will not, if he thinks he will not be called to 
give any account of his mental progress. We think the 
method of instruction which is preferable is the one which 
is best adapted to the mental training of the great maj< 
of our scholars, and not one which would be attended with 
good results in the cases of a few, who would make good 
progress under any system. For this reason we welcome 
every expedient whose tendency is to excite an interest in 
the minds of all the scholars, whether it be by object lessons. 
exercises upon the black board, spirited general exercises 
or what not^find especially do we welcome a teacher who 
is an enthusiast in her work and who is able to impart the 
magnetic influence of her spirit to those who are under her 
care. 

METHODS OF DISCIPLINE 

As we have intimated already, we consider good or- 
der one of the absolutely necessary characteristics of a 
good school ; but there is a stocking difference in teach- 
ers, as regards the ease with which they secure the re- 
quisite orderly conduct of their schools, and there is also 
a wide difference in schools, when under the charge of 
similarly efficient teachers, as regard the matter of order. 
There is also a difference in teachers as to their adaptabil- 
ity to certain methods for the promotion of good order in 



6 

school. Some teachers have a presence and certain qual- 
ities of character which command obedience with little or 
no effort ; some teachers have tact-or faculty of manage- 
ment which enables them to keep their scholars in a state 
of subordination, where others not possessed of these pe- 
culier gifts would fail. If all our teachers belonged to 
one of the classes just mentioned, there would be no ap- 
parant trouble in our schools, as regards discipline, but as 
most of our teachers have no special gifts that qualify 
them to govern a school, it is generally necessary for them 
to set before their scholars certain regulations and to en- 
force them by certain peralties. It was formerly the case 
that corporal punishment was almost always resorted to in 
cases of disobedience, but in recent times, this method has 
fallen largely into disuse, and other methods have taken 
its place. 

Whatever method of discipline is adopted will be 
likely to meet with objections on the part of some, provid- 
ed it is of such a nature as to hurt the feelings of the 
scholars. 

It is our opinion that the method of discipline in our 
schools should be left largely with the teachers, provided 
of course that it be reasonable. We have known cases 
where the infliction of corporal punishment seemed to 
save the school from being a total failure, and we have 
known of other cases, where it seemed as though another 
method would have been preferable : for this reason we 
think a teacher should be sustained in having recourse* 
to any reasonable means for securing obedience to the 
proper regulations of the school. 

Scholars should be made to feel that it is their duty 
to obey, and that any petty dislike of a teacher is no justi- 
fication for disobedience, and that it is not in the power of 
a few scholars by creating a scene of disorder, to secure 
the removal of the teacher, without exposing themselves 
to any danger of punishment or disgrace. When such a 
state of things as this takes place in our town, we may 
bid adieu to anything like successful schools. 

TEXT BOOKS. 

It is our policy to make just as few changes in text 



books as possible, consistenly with the best good of the 
schools. During the last seven years, there has been no 
considerable change in the books, excepting in reading 
and geography, and in the latter there was no change ex- 
cept by the way of experiment, and in all these cases the 
changes were made, as scholars were passing from one 
class into another and would need new books and could 
save one third or more of expense by buying the books 
that were being introduced. We have examined many new 
publications of text books, and have found in them some 
improvements over the ones now in use, but we have usu- 
ally found it to be the case that any want in the books 
now in use could be remedied by oral instruction, so that 
the advantage of a change would not be equal to the extra 
expense. 

TREATMENT OF TEACHERS. 

We consider a right view of this topic, on the part of 
our people generally, to be of the highest importance to 
the success of our schools. The entrance of almost any 
eacher upon the duties of a school is in some respects an 
experiment, ana especially is this so, in the case oi a 
teacher who has had no experience in the work. We 
consider the position of a teacher in a public school, as 
one of the most trying which it is possible for any one to 
occupy, and we feel that persons who assume this import- 
ant trust ought to have the sympathy and the most con- 
siderate treatment from every invidual who is interested in 
our schools. 

Our appropriation for school purposes is not suffi- 
ciently large to enable us to offer the inducements to 
teachers to take charge of our schools, which some of the 
larger and more wealthy towns are able to offer, but if we 
have the reputation of being kind and considerate in our 
treatment of teachers, this fact will aid us greatly in pro- 
curing and retaining the most excellent talent for our 
school work. We have tried to assist all our teachers, 
to the fullest extent, in their work during the past year, 
and in the composition of this report, have endeavored to 
treat them in a most kindly way, both out ot a regard for 
them and their interests, and also out of a regard for the 
best good of our schools. 



Without devoting any more of the limited space 01 
this report to the discussion of the salient features of our 
school system, considered as a whole, we now invite your 
attention to a brief notice of each school. 

CENTER GRAMMAR. 

The Spring and Fall terms of this school were Umght 
by Miss Ada C. Davis, a teacher cf tried experience, and 
of the highest order of qualifications for the duties of a 
teacher. The school made excellent progress under her 
instruction, and took a rank which was not excelled by 
any school in town. We were well pleased with Miss 
Davis' work and would have been glad to have had her in 
charge of the school during the winter term. 

The winter term was taught by Mr. C. E. Cloud, a 
graduate of the Scientific department of Dartmouth College. 
This teacher devoted himself to his work with much earnest- 
ness, but with his limited experience in this work found the 
discipline of the school somewhat difficult in the first part of 
the term. After the first month, however, the school seem- 
ed to be orderly and to be making at least the average 
amount of progress in the studies pursued. At the exam- 
ination which closed the term the school made a very good 
appearance indeed. We wish to repeat, however, what 
ive have stated before in these reports, that the prospect 
of success is far better, as regards any of our schools, if it is 
committed to the care of an experienced female teacher 
than to a male teacher who has had little if any experi- 
ence in the work of instruction. 

CENTER PRIMARY. 

The Spring term of this school was taught by Miss 
Lizzie S. Taylor, who had charge of the school during the 
whole of last year, and was spoken of in the highest terms 
of commendation in our last report. We think her success 
this term was even greater than that of the previous ones 
and we would have gladly continued her in this work, but 
she had the offer of a more pleasing position and resigned. 

The Fall term was taught by Miss Sara F. Robbins, 
a former teacher in this school ; as she has been favorably 



mentioned in two of our former reports, little need be said 
of her work here. We will simply say that we were well 
satisfied with her management of the school, and would 
have been pleased to have had it under her care during 
the Winter term. We were especially gratified by the 
good order of the school during the whole term. 

The Winter Term was taught bv Miss Nellie M. Co- 
nant. Miss C. is a resident of the district and had had 
comparative!}' little experience in the work of teaching and 
labored under a great disadvantage en these account, 
the matter of discipline. She gave herself most heartily to 
her id under other circumstances, no doubt would 

have had a good degree oi success in every respect. At 
the examination which closed the school the scholars ap- 
peared \ id seemed to have made considerable 
progress in their studies. 

SOUTH GRAMMAR. 

This school was tautjht throughout the year bv Miss 
M. F. Rice, a teacher of the highest culture, and most 
gentle and ladylike manners, whose presence [am- 

ple were the best of influences to her scholars to lead them 
to cultivate the highest qualities of mind and heart. The 
appearance of the school, under her management, was ev- 
ery thing we could have desired. We considered the 
term of this school the most successful winter term that we 
have had in this district for several years. At the close of 
the Winter term the scholars made their teacher some very 
pleasing and valuable presents as tokens of regard. 

SOUTH PRIMARY 

The Spring Term of this school was taught by Miss 
M. A. Forbush, a teacher who has been mentioned in two 
of our previous reports in terms of praise. We deemed 
her success this term even greater than it had been in 
previous terms. We have seldom seen a more reasonable 
and devoted attachment between teacher and scholars, than 
existed here. At the close of the term, the scholars pre- 
sented the teacher with a beautiful gift as a memento of 
their love. 

The Fall an5 Winter terms were taught by 



10 

Miss Jennie M. McAlister, a teacher ot considerable ex- 
perience and a good degree of natural fitness for her work. 
She devoted herself to her work with earnestness and the 
school showed a steady progress while under her charge. 
At the close of the Winter term the scholars presented her 
also with some beautiful gifts, as substantial proofs of their 
love. 

WEST GRAMMAR. 

The Spring Term of this school was taught by Mr. J. 
C. Bolan, A. B. Mr. B. was noticed in our last report, 
as the teacher of this school, and little need be said of his 
work here. He labored very conscientiously in the school 
and many of the scholarsmade excellent progress while un- 
der his instruction. Had he been able to give all his time and 
strength to the school we doubt not that his success would 
have been everything that we could have desired. As it 
was, many of the parents deemed him one of the best 
teachers we have had in the school for a long time. 

The Fall Term was taught by Miss M. j. Perigo. 
This teacher has been educated especially for the duties of 
a teacher, and has had several years of practical experi- 
ence in the work, and being naturally of an enthusiastic 
temperament, she was able to carry qualifications into the 
school room such as we are seldom so fortunate as to find 
combined in a teacher. The scholars responded to the 
well directed efforts of the teacher quite readily, and the 
progress of the school was steady and substantial through- 
out the term. 

The Winter Term was taught by Miss M. J. Perigo 
and Mrs. M. W. Going. Miss P. had charge of the 
school during the first five weeks of the term, and managed 
it with the same satisfactory results which attended her 
work in the Fall: but at the end of that time, she was 
obliged to lay aside her duties on account of illness. After 
an interval of two weeks, she resigned and Mrs. M. W. 
Going consented to take charge of the school. Mrs. G. 
is a teacher ot a good degree of experience and the best 
of natural qualifications for the work, and, though she had 
not been in the vocation of a teacher for more than ten 
years, she took it up again in this school with an enthusi- 
asm and earnestness which were the promise of a success 



11 

which did not disappoint in any respect. Considering the 
interruption of the school by the illness of its first teacher 
and by the sickness of scholars, the examination at the 
close of the term was highly satisfactory and exceedingly 
creditable to teachers and scholars. 

WEST PRIMARY. 

This school was taught throughout the year by Miss 
Clara L. Sweatt. This teacher had charge of the same 
school during the Winter term of last year and was spoken 
of in terms of praise in our last report. We feel it due to 
her, however, to state here that we think she has improved 
in her ability to teach during each term, and that we now 
consider her one of the best teachers of a primary school 
that we have had in our schools for several years. She 
has the happy facility of securing good order without 
incurring the ill will of any of her scholars, which is a very 
difficult thing to accomplish in such a school. 

XORXH SCHOOL. 

The Spring and Fall terms of this school were taught 
by Mrs. Allie H. Loker. Mrs. Loker had charge of this 
school two terms last year and was so favorably mentioned 
in our last report that little remains to be said here. We 
wish simply to state that we never knew a school to mani- 
fest more interest or to make a better degree of progress 
than did this school while under the charge of this teacher. 
In enthusiasm and facility in the employment of expedients 
for exciting and sustaining the interest of the scholars, this 
teacher is not surpassed. 

The Winter Term of this school was taught by Miss 
Ada C. Davis. The benefit of the school was somewhat 
impaired by the illness of scholars : but the management 
was without reproach, and the progress of those scholars 
who were able to attend school uninterruptedly was excel- 
lent. 

EAST SCHOOL. 

The Spring Term of this school was taught by Miss 
G. E. Tuttle. Miss Tuttle has been mentioned in our two 



12 

last reports in terms of such praise that we need add little 
here. She was not only very successful with her school 
in exciting an interest in the regular studies which were 
pursued, but gave a very pleasing exhibition of the amount 
of information which may be imparted to scholars orally, 
by interesting them in the subject of Astronomy, and going 
out with them in the evening to trace the constellations and 
watch for the appearance of certain stars, so that at the 
end of the term the whole school had such a knowledge 
of this subject as would have seemed hardly possible. We 
would have been pleased to have had the continued ser- 
vices of this teacher, but as has been frequently the case 
i our most successful teachers, she had the offer of a 
more permanent, and as she thought, a far more pleasant 
position, and she decided to accept. After her resignation 
the people of this district showed their appreciation of her 
services by bestowing upon her some very valuable, beau- 
tiful and useful gifts. 

The Fall Term was taught by Miss H. L. Cook, a 
young lady of culture and refinement, but wanting in expe- 
rience as a teacher. She labored under disadvantages 
arising from her want of experience, and from the fact 
that she was called to succeed a teacher of such superior 
qualifications and such a long and successful experience 
in the same school. We have never seen a teacher who 
seemed more anxious to succeed than she was, and under 
other conditions her success might have been equal to her 
desires. As it was, the examination which closed the 
school was quite creditable and equal to the average of 
examinations during the past year. 

The winter term was taught by Miss F. M. Hartwell, 
a teacher of pleasing manners and considerable expe- 
rience, in the work of an instructor. We visited the 
school three times during the term and attended a public 
examination at its close, and on all these occasions, the 
school appeared as well as we could have desired. We 
have every reason to feel that the school made a steady 
and reasonable progress in all the studies which were pur- 
sued during the term. The examination at the close was 
very creditable to teacher and scholars. 



13 

SOUTH EAST. 

As appears from the statistical report, the school in 
this part of the town has been very small during the year, 
so small that it is very difficult to form anything like an 
intelligent estimate of the work of the teachers who had 
them in charge. 

The Spring term was taught by Miss A. W. Packard 
who had charge of this school tw r o terms last year and 
was favorably mentioned in our last report. 

We were very much pleased with Miss Packard's 
methods of teaching and consider her one of the most 
competent teachers we have had in our schools for several 
years. She did everything with the school, that it was 
possible for any teacher to do, and gave complete satisfac- 
tion to all concerned. 

The fall term was taught by Miss Nellie M. Conant. 
This was Miss C's. first experience in teaching, but she 
devoted herself most earnestly to her work, and was suc- 
cessful to such a degree that the committee would have 
been pleased to secure her services for another term. 

The winter term was taught by Miss C. S. Hay ward. 
Miss H. came well recommended and has had considera- 
ble successful experience in the work of instruction. 
Whenever we visited the school, it appeared orderly and 
the examination at the close seemed to indicate that the 
scholars had made as much progiess as could be expected 
under the circumstances. 

Appended, are the usual statistical reports to which 
we invite your careful consideration. Some of the dis- 
tricts have had the benefit of an unusually large number of 
weeks of school during the year and the advantage of 
such extended school privileges has been very apparant 
in the scholars progress in their studies. 
Respectfully submitted, 

C. A. HARRINGTON, Chairman,] 

LUTHER CONANT, Clerk, | School 

C. B. STONE, | 

W. S. JONES, [> Committee 

I. W. FLAGG, 

G. H. HARRIS, | of Acton. 

F. P. WOOD, Supt. of Schools, J 



14 



ROLL OF HONOR. 



NAMES OF THOSE WHO HATE NOT BEEN TARDY OR ABSENT. 



Center Grammar. 

For one Term. 
Sarah Hammond, 
Julia Lane, 
Etta Turtle, 
Mary Waldron, 
Elbridge Conant, 
Arthur Davis, 
George Lee, 
John Kinsley, 
Lyman Robbins, 
George H. Turtle, 

For two terms. 
Annie Hammond. 

For three terms. 
Carrie Lund. 

Center Primary. 

For one term. 
Luther Conant, Jr., 
Warren Robbins, 
Bertie Reed, 
Hattie Smith, 
Augusta Smith, 
Gracie Turtle. 

For two terms. 
Nina Aycrs, 
Jennie Ayers, 
Susie E. Conant, 
Hattie M. Bobbins, 
Hattie L. Tut tie. 

SOUTH GRAMMAR. 

For one term. 
Josie M. Hannon, 



Mary A. Knight, 
Susie A. Moulton, 
Lois E. Pond, 
Emma A. Pratt, 
Henrietta F. Sawyer, 
S. Bertie Turtle, 
Charlie Fletcher, 
Hiram E. Gates, 
John Wilder, 
Chrissie A. Pollard. 

For two terms. 
Nettie C. Fuller, 
Eda Shafley, 
Eva C. S/iapley. 

For three terms. 
Mabel Richardson, 
Etta C. Temple, 
Arlon U. Jackson, 
Willie H. Wilbur. 

South Primary. 

For one term. 
IdellaJ. Barker, 
! Emily G. Hannon, 
Clara F. Leach, 
Martha C. Pratt, 
Lillie F. Richardson, 
Sadie E. Sawyer, 
Fred S. Fletcher, 
Frank Heustis, 
Lulie E. Hosmer, 
Johnie Lynch, 
George C. Warren. 

For two terms. 
Gertie S. Harrington, 



15 



Harry A. Fletcher, 
Charlie W. Leach, 
Ernest E. Wilbur. 

West Grammar. 

For one term, 
Florence Noyes, 
Arthur Bradford, 
Xed Holton, 
Willie Hart, 
David Kinsley. 

For two terms. 
Mary Tuttlc. 

West Primary* 

For one term. 
Maud Briggs, 
Gertie Cutler, 
Bertie Gardner, 
Addie Houghton, 
Emma Knowlton, 
Alice Hoar, 
Flora Richardson. 
John Aldrich, 
Emery Clark, 
Bertie Holt, 
Herman Parker, 
Everett Richardson, 
Fred Teel, 
Charlie Town. 

For two Terms. 
Ida Littlejield, 
Ida Tut tie, 
Walter Gardner, 
Eutfcne Hall. 

For three Terms, 
Ida Richardson, 



Ernest Knowlton, 
Alfred Richardson, 
Bertie Willis. 

>ORTH ACTO>. 

For one Term. 
Bertie Smith, 

For two Terms. 
Nellie Ryan, 
Lizzie Ryan, 
Elzvin Harris, 
Everett Rouillard 

East School. 

For one Term. 
E. Bertha Hosmer, 
Grace E. Tavlor, 
Frank H. Billings. 
Freddie W. Billings, 
Carlton C. Conant, 
Willie D. Davis, 
Arthur B. Davis, 
Willie O. Smith, 
Ernest Wetherbee, 
J. Roland Wetherbee. 

For two Terms. 
Harry G. Rod dins. 

For three Terms. 
Herbert H. Robbins. 

South East, 

For one Term 
Willie Hooper, 
Freddie Jones, 
Willie Jones. 



16 



TABULAR VIEW. 









^ 


^ 


> 

8 


S! 


z 


£ - 






a5 


;» 


















DB 


c 
yi a 


J? 

a 


a 

c *» 


I 


5-1 

X ** 


SCHOOLS. 


TEACHERS. 


5 c_ 

X o 

• sr 


| 


? a- 


> 
a 


§ I 

•-s 


- z 
« 3 


2 c 
pu** 

12. X 






c 


rt- 


% 


s 


Vr 


Ci 


2 S" 






1 — 


W* 


^ 


~ 


*< 


««* 


~, 






£• 




** 






X 


y. 0" 




SPRING TERM. 
















Pentre i Grammar. 
Centie. jp rinuuC y j 


Miss A. C. Davis. 


3 


836 00 


28 


24.22 








6 


•• L. S. Taylor, 


3 


32 00 


28 


25 


1 





10 


-, Grammar, 
South. j primaryj 


•• M. F. Rice, 


3 


40 00 


37 


34.5 








13 


" M. A. Forbush, 


3 


in lid 45 


38.3 





1 


19 


w \ Grammar, 

NN e '" r - / Primary. 


Mr. J. C. Bolan, 


2i 

It 


40 00 33 


27 





1 


12 


Mis.- C. L. Sweatt, 


36 00 46 


43 


2 





32 


North. 


Mrs. A. H. Loker. 


32 00 22 


20.2 








12 


East. 


Miss G. E. Tattle, 


2l 


32 00 24 


22.23 





1 


17 


South East. 


Miss A. W. Packard, 
Totals, 


2" 


3o or 


14 


11.25 


1 





6 




23J 


318 00 


275 


265.7 


4 


8 


127 




FALL TERM. 
















~ , i Grammar, 
Centre, \ Wmaxjt 


Miss A. C. Davis, 


II 


|36 00 24 


i <;..-> 








1 


•• s. F. Bobbins, 


32 oi, 3o 


23.9 


1 





9 


c i.i ( Grammar. 
South. - Primai . y . 


•• M. F. Rice, 


3 


40 00 35 


32.10 





5 


25 


" J. M. McAllister, 


3 


36 00 45 


40.4 





1 


10 


, i Grammar. 


•• M. J. Perigo, 


11 

2i 


40 (" 


32 





1 


15 


NNl>1 - \ Primary, 


•• ('. L. Sweatt, 


40 00 43 


40 








20 


North, 


Mrs. A. H. Loker. 


32 oo 22 


16.8 








7 


East. 


Miss H. L. Cook, 


2} 


32 00 2.; 


21 





1 


6 


South East, 


Mis>> N. M. Conant, 

Totals, 


2 


8 


7.33 








6 




m 


316 00 


271 


229.64 


1 


8 


99 




WINTER TERM. 
















~ , [ Grammar, 
Centre. }p rimar y | 


Mr. C. E. Cloud, 


II 


$40 00 




28.58 





16 


7 


Miss N. M. Gonant. 


32 oo 


27 


22.2C 








12 


a i"2 > Grammar, 
South, j primly/ 


•• M. F. Pace. 


40 00 


51 


45 





10 


7 


" J. M. McAllister, 


36 00 


46 


40.5 





1 


7 


i Grammar. 
West < 


•• M.J. Perigo &{ 
Mrs. M. W. Going, f 


2f 


40 00 


42 


35.2: 





3 


15 


1 Primary, 


Miss C. L. Sweatt, 


11 

3J 


40 00 4:; 


38 








28 


North, 


•• A.C.Davis. 


3 l J (X 


14 





3 


7 


East, 


" F. M. Hart well, 


32 00 22 


16.03 





2 


8 


South East, 


•' C. S. Hayward, 

Totals, 
Aggregate for year, 


2" 


28 00 10 


8.3C 





2 


6 




26i 


329 00 299 


247.91 





37 


97 




724. 


961 00 


845 


743.2c 


5 


53 


~323 



The average attendance during the year, .85i of the whole No. of scholars. 



17 



FINANCIAL EEPORT. 



SOUTH SCHOOL. 

Drawn from the treasury, 
Received for grass, 

" for use of school house. 
Balance from last year, 



$(581 


n 


1 


00 


109 


GO 


44 


30 


$677 


00 


48 


14 


44 


45 


18 


82 


11 


90 


35 


80 



$836 11 



Paid to teachers, 

" for fuel and preparing it, 

44 for care of house and furnace, 

for hardware work (Mr. Holt's bills,) 18 
" for incidentals, 
Balance on hand, 

$836 11 
C. A. HARRINGTON, Committee. 

WEST SCHOOL. 



$696 16 



Drawn from the treasury. 


$681 21 


Balance from last year, 


14 95 


Paid to teachers, 


571 00 


" for fuel and preparing it, 


57 05 


" for a dictionary, 


8 50 


" for care of house and furnace, 


45 00 


" for incidentals, 


9 90 


Balance on hand, 


4 71 



$696 16 
C. B. STONE, Committee. 



18 
CENTER SCHOOL. 



Drawn from the treasury, 
Balance from last year, 

Paid to teachers, 

" for fuel, 

" for care of house, 

" for incidentals, books, &c, 
Balance on hand, 



$676 


37 


54 


65 


$605 


40 


61 


50 


30 


25 


15 


18 


18 


69 



$731 92 



$731 02 

LUTHER CONANT, Committee. 

NORTH SCHOOL,. 



1346 75 



Drawn from the treasury, 


$308 11 


Balance from last year, 


38 64 


Paid to teachers, 


$278 75 


" for fuel, 


34 50 


" for care of house, 


12 00 


" for incidentals, 


7 80 


Balance on hand, 


13 70 



$346 75 
G. H. HARRIS, Committee, 

EAST SCHOOL. 

Drawn from the treasury, $308 11 

Balance from last vear, 5 10 

Money advanced to make up this year's 

deficiency, 4 67 

$317 88 



Paid to teachers, $259 00 

" for fuel and preparing it,. . 39 G6 

" for incidentals and cleaning house, 5 22 
" for care of house, 14 00 



$317 88 



I. W. FLAGG, Committee. 

REFERENCE BOOK 

ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
ACTON. MASSACHUSETTS 01720